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Beefy strat?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Bacton, Jul 5, 2006.

  1. Bacton

    Bacton Member

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    Ive always loved the sound of a good strat for lead work, but ive never been able to use these guitars in my band situation because they always sound to dinky for most rock applications. What guitars should I check out that have the lead tone of a strat, yet have enough balls to rock out with the gibsons?
     
  2. Luke V

    Luke V Member

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    A Strat with a Fralin SP 43 in the treble position.
     
  3. Badger71

    Badger71 Member

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    G&L Legacy Special. I prefer/own the swamp ash model. Beefy AND inexpensive on the used market. I got mine for $500.
     
  4. rwe333

    rwe333 Supporting Member

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    +1
    Also check G&L's S-500 and Comanche.
     
  5. lbw

    lbw Member

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    I have a Fender Stratocaster with three Lindy Fralin Steel Pole 42s. It's fat with a capital ph.
     
  6. mdog114

    mdog114 Member

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    [​IMG]

    I just assembled this Warmoth. It's got a chambered Padauk/Padauk body and a Dimarzio ToneZone in the bridge. It gets pretty beefy when called upon.

    You might want to look into a H-S-S style strat.
     
  7. LightninBoy

    LightninBoy Member

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  8. lcjc800

    lcjc800 Member

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    Any Strat with a set of RIO GRANDE Muy Grande's can stand up to anything.
     
  9. aquadog

    aquadog Member

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    EXACTLY what I was thinking. All three of those have the PTB controls (treble and bass controls instead of tone controls), which will really allow you to beef up your tone, especially on the s-500 and the Comanche.

    the legacy is the most classic strat tones

    the s-500 is more modern sounding but still retains the strat characteristics

    the comanche is, imho, the most interesting/unique/versitile of the three and will also sound the biggest. It can cop strat tones pretty damn well, among many others and its own unique voicing.

    I don't think you can go wrong with any of them, all though I do love the comanche in particular
     
  10. dzeitlin

    dzeitlin Member

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    A HUGE +1 on this. They get close to P90s.
     
  11. Troubleman

    Troubleman Silver Supporting Member

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    I have a Strat with Harmonic Design Vintage Plus pups in the bridge and middle (and HD's mid-control) and a Duncan JBmini humbucker (single coil-sized humbucker) in the bridge. Once I roll off some of the highs on the JBmini, it rocks. It's not the equivalent of a full-sized JB, but it gets the job done.

    jb
     
  12. snarkle

    snarkle Member

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    They're not the prettiest guitars in the world, but the early Music Man Sabre and Stingray guitars might be the fattest-sounding Fender-style solidbodies ever made. My Sabre II is particularly amazing for slide...gets the Lowell George sound WITHOUT outboard compression (which may be why Paul Barrere used one for years).

    Note that the Sabre II and Stingray II have small frets and nicely radiused fingerboards; my well-broken-in maple-necked model feels a lot like an early-issue 50s Strat. The Sabre I and Stingray I have larger frets and a flatter fingerboard and don't feel as comfortable to me...but that's just a matter of preference. The main thing is that if you're looking for beef, these guitars deliver.

    On the other hand, they're so loud that you're going to have to make major adjustments if you're switching between them and anything else on-stage.
     

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