Behringer FBQ2496 Feedback Destroyer- Inital setup.

LHanson

Member
Messages
7,759
I had a gift card from the FIL and thought one of these might be nice for our on-stage monitor setup, as opposed to me having to jump at the EQ on the mixer when things get out of hand. It also functions as a parametric EQ, and the internet is full of audiophiles using these as EQ on their stereo rigs. This fact might figure in later....

So, I try the thing at a rehearsal. It doesn't seem to do anything, and the manual included indicates that, if you simply patch the thing in properly, it will merrily start chasing feedback freqs and notching them out with unerring accuracy. Well, that doesn't seem to happen, but I write it off to the way our rehearsal PA head works, and that there is some signal making it's way across the main breakout. No biggie, we have a gig the next night, and we will be using a separate power amp for the monitor mix.

Well, that doesn't work, either. I manage to kill the offending freqs with the 15 band EQ on the monitor mixer without mangling the sound too badly, and the gig goes on without feedback.

I'd still like my birthday toy to work. I write Behringer with my issue, and within 24 hours, they send this:

As far as the FBQ2496, the most common problem is the parametric filter assignment. It seems like the default state for the unit is with zero single shot filters set and all parametrics engaged. Let's go ahead run this in COUPLED ENGINES mode, so press and hold the LEFT/RIGHT buttons both engines are processing a stereo signal simultaneously.

For running the unit in automatic mode, where you have all 20 filters constantly chasing and deploying automatically, set the parametric filters and the single shot as follows:

- Turn the unit on
- Press the LEARN button briefly
- Turn the jog wheel until the display reads S0
- Press the LEARN button briefly
- Press the PEQ button for 2 seconds, and bring up the parametric filter assignments. Turn the jog wheel until the display reads P0.
- Press the PEQ button briefly. This puts you back in RUN mode.

The automatic mode enables the unit to chase feedback and squelch it automatically. However, in this mode, the after a preset amount of time, the filters will release so it can find a different frequency. This is especially useful if the feedback frequencies are constantly changing, for example if you have an active lead singer on stage.


Now, here's how you set it so you have all 20 filters dedicated to single shot:
- Turn the unit on
- Press and hold the PEQ button for a few seconds. This brings up the parametric filter assignments - turn the jog wheel until the display reads P0.
- Press the PEQ button briefly.
- Press the LEARN button briefly
- The display will more than likely read S0. Turn the jog wheel until it reads S20 and all the filter lights are lit
- Press the LEARN button briefly to go back to RUN mode.

At this point, you should be able to use the LEARN function to ring out the system if you want, or just leave it ready to accept signal and squelch back any occuring feedback. In this particular setting, the filters will not release, however, you will be limited to 20.

So, Uli and his brainiacs sent a "Feedback Destroyer" out configured to be a parametric EQ. Maybe he recognized his real market, but forgot to buy a new silkscreen for the case. Needless to say, Uli's getting my opinion about how his company configures their stuff, and the lack of documentation as supplied. I'll try this thing at a rehearsal to see if it works, then make a decision about if I keep it or not.
 

speakerjones

Member
Messages
2,299
It sounds as if you already know how to use an EQ. Get a 31 band graphic (non-Behringer preferably) and tune your monitors for maximum GBF BEFORE you start playing, and you won't have to chase anything.
 

Nelson89

Member
Messages
3,610
I don't think i've ever read anything that mentioned "audiophiles" and "behringer" in the same sentence that wasn't specifically written by behringer...not to say behringer is totally useless, they definitely fill a niche in the market, but its definitely budget gear, most audiophiles aren't really in this niche though.

As far as the "feedback destroyer" thing goes...i'm not totally convinced...you're better off with a 31 band graphic, and like jalford said, tune everything beforehand. If you're doing your own sound, then i'm just going to assume that there won't be enough people in the room to really change things all that much, cause if there were, you'd probably have a separate sound guy.
 

mixwiz

Member
Messages
2,335
The original name for the product was "sound destroyer" but the marketing guys changed it. Dump it.
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
38,261
It sounds as if you already know how to use an EQ. Get a 31 band graphic (non-Behringer preferably) and tune your monitors for maximum GBF BEFORE you start playing, and you won't have to chase anything.
+1

do it right and you won't be fighting feedback in the first place, even with 15-band EQs.

a big part of the answer is more powerful monitor amps; they just make even cheap monitors stronger and less in need of excess EQ.
 

Cessquill

Member
Messages
2
Apologies for resurrecting an old thread, but I just wanted to say thank you for sharing the information.

We run up to 4 lines of monitoring with potentially 4 brass, 4 vocal mics and perhaps 4 instrument mics.

We're not always in the position where there's a dedicated monitor mix on stage - or even anybody on the desk sometimes after initial setup. We have therefore had one of the old FBQ in the rack and it's worked great on lines 1 and 2. Just turn it on and it's scanning away.

When it packed up we bought 2 of the 2946's, and up until now have been scratching our heads wondering what exactly it thought it was doing. The manual was pretty hopeless, so thankfully this thread has saved us from hoying it out the window.

Obviously not a perfect solution, but the old one has saved us face in tight situations when one of us has to stop mid song and have a scrabble around to find out what's coming out where and at what frequency. Doff my cap to anybody that can do that instinctively.


Just to clarify on a point raised above. About 5 years ago audiophiles in the Home Cinema (Theater) market would use these as a means to flatten out subwoofers and smooth the crossover between sub and main speakers.

Armed with an SPL meter, a notepad and a sweeping tone generator, they would spend quite a lot of time flattening the bass so that it wasn't dominating or sucked out, and the 1 or 2 octaves that they crossed with the main speakers was as invisible as possible.

Then Velodyne launched a range of Subwoofers with auto-eq built in, and an SMS-1 automatic parametric eq designed for subwoofer installations. That's when we picked ours up cheap (free). Since then, quite a few pre-amps and processors have the technology built-in.

Not sure whether you'll find it interesting, but it made me feel like I was giving something back for this advice!

Cheers guys.
Simon
 

robare99

Senior Member
Messages
1,143
Audiophiles = :facepalm


Who else would pay over $100/foot for directional cryo-treated speaker cable, then throw a $200 Behringer feedback destroyer into a system with no microphones or feedback loops.


Again.

:facepalm


How are your stage volumes, if you can keep them reasonable, there will be a lot less feedback problems.
 

LHanson

Member
Messages
7,759
You're most welcome.

Apologies for resurrecting an old thread, but I just wanted to say thank you for sharing the information.

We run up to 4 lines of monitoring with potentially 4 brass, 4 vocal mics and perhaps 4 instrument mics.

We're not always in the position where there's a dedicated monitor mix on stage - or even anybody on the desk sometimes after initial setup. We have therefore had one of the old FBQ in the rack and it's worked great on lines 1 and 2. Just turn it on and it's scanning away.

When it packed up we bought 2 of the 2946's, and up until now have been scratching our heads wondering what exactly it thought it was doing. The manual was pretty hopeless, so thankfully this thread has saved us from hoying it out the window.

Obviously not a perfect solution, but the old one has saved us face in tight situations when one of us has to stop mid song and have a scrabble around to find out what's coming out where and at what frequency. Doff my cap to anybody that can do that instinctively.


Just to clarify on a point raised above. About 5 years ago audiophiles in the Home Cinema (Theater) market would use these as a means to flatten out subwoofers and smooth the crossover between sub and main speakers.

Armed with an SPL meter, a notepad and a sweeping tone generator, they would spend quite a lot of time flattening the bass so that it wasn't dominating or sucked out, and the 1 or 2 octaves that they crossed with the main speakers was as invisible as possible.

Then Velodyne launched a range of Subwoofers with auto-eq built in, and an SMS-1 automatic parametric eq designed for subwoofer installations. That's when we picked ours up cheap (free). Since then, quite a few pre-amps and processors have the technology built-in.

Not sure whether you'll find it interesting, but it made me feel like I was giving something back for this advice!

Cheers guys.
Simon
 

Cessquill

Member
Messages
2
Audiophiles probably wasn't the correct term here! The people I knew with them had their hobbies, but they weren't quite *that* obsessed! Bass is a weird thing in a living room.

The stage volumes - for most of the time - are OK. Every now and then though you get a small place to play, which has many knock on issues...

- I play keys, and I can be sitting almost on top of the drums
- The monitor is too close, so everybody behind me is getting an earful, but I can't hear a thing
- Sometimes the monitor is a little bit under my keyboard, and it's usually the tweeter
- I'm also the singer too, and tend to strain my voice too much if I can't hear

Like I say - large stages, it's all fine. When you're all on top of each other, it's a pain. Add four brass, a harp, a mic'd valve amp and three backing vocal mics, and after a while a feedback destroyer is a handy bit of kit.

Cheers guys
 

RustyAxe

Member
Messages
3,012
I have the same unit. Took it out of the box, installed it in the rack, read the manual, and had it working in no time. Don't blame Behringer if you didn't RTFM or understand what you read. The unit works great and has great flexibility (fixed filters, dynamic filters, and active EQ ... mix and match).
 

LHanson

Member
Messages
7,759
I have the same unit. Took it out of the box, installed it in the rack, read the manual, and had it working in no time. Don't blame Behringer if you didn't RTFM or understand what you read. The unit works great and has great flexibility (fixed filters, dynamic filters, and active EQ ... mix and match).
Glad you had a good experience. You might try reading the thread to understand my experience.
 




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