Being told NO in a music store.

SamBooka

Member
Messages
2,224
When to a local music shop and saw a 79 ES175 CC (charlie christian) on the wall (next to a Super 400).

I am just not getting along with my ES165 and the 125 isnt much better. Nothing wrong with them, I just need a change.

So I asked the guy at the store to try it and he was "No, sorry. It's used and for sale on consignment."

... excuse me? Now, I am a male, 43yo, in my work clothes as a network admin (so a little too casual for business casual but close).

I am a little just WTF.. do I have to wave 4K around before I can even look at it (when he told me the price I said "too much.. these usually go for 3000-3500 max.. he checked and the correct price is 3600 but that is probably because of the wiggle room.)

But still .. WFT?

EDIT: The reason I mentioned the Super 400 because that is what I REALLY wanted to try but there is no way I can afford it so I didnt even bother so it is not like I was going for the most expensive guitar in the store. AND ANOTHER THING... when he did let me try it he says "I suppose you want to plug it into a fender.. " He was a little shocked when I said no.. even a decent bass amp will do. "A bass amp???" Just .. speechless.
 

Luke

Senior Member
Messages
11,898
I've always felt that people should have to show proof of funds. No realtor would take you out without it. As guitars get handled they get bumped, scuffed and marked up. I can see both points of view. Ultimately you can shop elsewhere, their loss right?
 

lp_bruce

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
17,844
That's just BS. There was a used music store here locally where the owner would basically stalk you and give you a hassle if you wanted to try anything. I went in a few times, but the prices (WAY too high) and his attitude turned me away. He had some great stuff, but (surprise) eventually went out of business.

Peace,
 

DonW

Velocity Town Angel
Double Platinum Member
Messages
5,468
Bad policy. Granted they must've had a problem with damage to gear during a demo but with an employee present it should be allowed. Prospective and return sales are not something this shop is interested in. They should have insurance on their inventory and politely supervise anyone handling instruments, not projecting a problem in each and every demo.
 

'58Bassman

Member
Messages
4,920
When to a local music shop and saw a 79 ES175 CC (charlie christian) on the wall (next to a Super 400).

I am just not getting along with my ES165 and the 125 isnt much better. Nothing wrong with them, I just need a change.

So I asked the guy at the store to try it and he was "No, sorry. It's used and for sale on consignment."

... excuse me? Now, I am a male, 43yo, in my work clothes as a network admin (so a little too casual for business casual but close).

I am a little just WTF.. do I have to wave 4K around before I can even look at it (when he told me the price I said "too much.. these usually go for 3000-3500 max.. he checked and the correct price is 3600 but that is probably because of the wiggle room.)

But still .. WFT?

EDIT: The reason I mentioned the Super 400 because that is what I REALLY wanted to try but there is no way I can afford it so I didnt even bother so it is not like I was going for the most expensive guitar in the store. AND ANOTHER THING... when he did let me try it he says "I suppose you want to plug it into a fender.. " He was a little shocked when I said no.. even a decent bass amp will do. "A bass amp???" Just .. speechless.
They're probably trying to avoid having to reimburse the owner of the guitar for any damage that occurs while it's in their possession which, ironically, makes selling it almost impossible.

The amp comments shows that the guy IS totally clueless.

Maybe he doesn't like Ted The Sledge and didn't want to hear you cranking 'Cat Scratch Fever', not realizing that he usually played a Byrdland in the old days.
 

BigPapiFan

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,496
I can understand being very careful, maybe even picky, about letting customers play expensive instruments. This is especially so for items that are on consignment. If it were my ES-175, I would want them to be extremely judicious about helping people try it.
 

BKL71

Member
Messages
1,432
I can understand a music store owner being hesitant to let some kid (without adult accompaniment) try out an expensive guitar, as they are the ones most likely to cause damage. Turning away a well-dressed adult is a different story. Whenever I used to get this attitude from a music store, I used to ask them, "Would you buy a car without driving it first? So why do you think I would buy a guitar from you without playing it first?" I would then walk out the door. I prefer not to support stores that treat people like that. Incidentally, ALL of the stores that ever gave me this attitude are gone today.
 
Messages
2,843
I've always felt that people should have to show proof of funds. No realtor would take you out without it. As guitars get handled they get bumped, scuffed and marked up. I can see both points of view. Ultimately you can shop elsewhere, their loss right?
Maybe it's different here in Canada, but I've never had a realtor ask me to show proof of funds.
 

TheGuildedAge

Member
Messages
13,074
I can't say I am shocked. I have a 1930 Martin I thought of consigning. I was surprised the shop refused it.

He said it's a tough market and it will just sit while everyone who wants to touch a 30 Martin asks to play it. He also mentioned that as it gets handled, any scuff, nick, etc. he's going to have to call me and take a risk on me getting mad. I never thought of it from that angle.
 
Messages
2,843
I can't say I am shocked. I have a 1930 Martin I thought of consigning. I was surprised the shop refused it.

He said it's a tough market and it will just sit while everyone who wants to touch a 30 Martin asks to play it. He also mentioned that as it gets handled, any scuff, nick, etc. he's going to have to call me and take a risk on me getting mad. I never thought of it from that angle.
Agree with the above, but once its in the store you shouldn't dissuade potential customers.
 

leftty

Member
Messages
708
Nothing wrong with the store policy, yeah show you have the cash and are seriously interested and no problem. The insurance thing well yeah the probably do have it but look at it this way. You buy a new car let your friend drive it and he totals it do you get the full price you paid for the car, no you dont same thing with the guitar.
 

MKB

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
8,317
Our local music store has treated others and myself poorly in the past, and have lost thousands of dollars of business because of it. In some cases they get the supreme insult; try something in the store, decide you want it, then go and buy it elsewhere. I would love to give them business as I strongly believe in supporting local businesses, but they have really burnt a bridge with me.

The last brick and mortar I did a lot of business with was the terrific Hanes Music in Gaffney SC, under the peach (you locals know what I'm talking about). One day I took a day off at work and dropped the family off at the Outlet Mall, then went to Hanes to buy a Gibson ES. The sales guy told me to help myself with anything, and I was free to go behind the counter at any time and get the good stuff myself. When I asked price, if he couldn't beat internet prices, he would pull up the MF web site and offer it to me at their price. No haggling necessary. I spent 3 hours in there, totally enthralled, and walked out with a new guitar. I bought my next 2 guitars from them as well.

I really miss Hanes, it was a great store.
 

Luke

Senior Member
Messages
11,898
They don't anywhere else either.
Then you must live in a different universe. Whenever I've called a realtor to see a home, one of the first things they ask is if you are "pre-approved" for the purchase amount. Meaning, you've applied for a mortgage and can borrow a specified amount. If you say "no" they might show you a few places, but they aren't taking you out to see twenty homes. They are not looking to run around to entertain people with homes they are unable to purchase.
 

GermanCDN

Member
Messages
359
I think the art of sale is quickly getting lost. Clearly if you can't play it, you're not going to buy it. Nuff said.

But it's getting worse than that. I was on a business trip last week, and stopped in to a local boutique store. No prices on any of their gear (first major turn off), all guitars behind the counter (there wasn't a guitar in there with a selling price higher than $5K, and most were between 2.5 and 4), and the sales guy was literally more interested in watching the soccer game than turning around and taking an interest in me. Had $3k burning a hole in my pocket, turned around, walked across the street to a chain store, and spent it there. Funny how that works.
 
Messages
2,843
Then you must live in a different universe. Whenever I've called a realtor to see a home, one of the first things they ask is if you are "pre-approved" for the purchase amount. Meaning, you've applied for a mortgage and can borrow a specified amount. If you say "no" they might show you a few places, but they aren't taking you out to see twenty homes. They are not looking to run around to entertain people with homes they are unable to purchase.
In your original post you used the phrase:

show proof of funds[\quote]

Which is different from telling a realtor where your funds are coming from. For example some buyers will pay 100% cash which makes the sale easier for all involved, others will finance some portion of the purchase price.

Saying all that, I've never heard a realtor say "bring me written proof you've been pre-approved for $X or that you have a balance of $Y in your savings account".
 

Jimmy3Fingers

Member
Messages
3,306
In your original post you used the phrase:

show proof of funds

Which is different from telling a realtor where your funds are coming from. For example some buyers will pay 100% cash which makes the sale easier for all involved, others will finance some portion of the purchase price.

Saying all that, I've never heard a realtor say "bring me written proof you've been pre-approved for $X or that you have a balance of $Y in your savings account".
Have you ever bought a house with cash funds? That's exactly what they do in the U.S. and funding requires a pre-approved letter, as previously stated.
 

gmann

Member
Messages
8,627
Go to Mandolin Brothers, you can play ANYTHING, and that is how you run a business.
This is who I thought of as I read the OP's statement. Back in the early '90's I had the opportunity to go to Mandolin Bros. as I was working on Staten Is. Went to all the stores on Manhattan too but that's another story. Anyway, I spot this pre war D28 on the wall. I'm just droolin'. Stan Jay says take it down and play it. I told him I couldn't afford a guitar like that. He says no matter, I just want to see the look on your face when you hit that big old G chord. So I obliged him. He said, yeah, that's the look! Then he walked off and left me to it. I wore that guitar out for about 10 mins. I thanked him when I left. Great store and the owner is a class act.
 




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