Being told NO in a music store.

tiktok

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
22,711
This is who I thought of as I read the OP's statement. Back in the early '90's I had the opportunity to go to Mandolin Bros. as I was working on Staten Is. Went to all the stores on Manhattan too but that's another story. Anyway, I spot this pre war D28 on the wall. I'm just droolin'. Stan Jay says take it down and play it. I told him I couldn't afford a guitar like that. He says no matter, I just want to see the look on your face when you hit that big old G chord. So I obliged him. He said, yeah, that's the look! Then he walked off and left me to it. I wore that guitar out for about 10 mins. I thanked him when I left. Great store and the owner is a class act.
Yeah, but isn't that the store that was in danger of going under so they were asking for donations to cover their costs?
 

Heinz57Pep

Member
Messages
11,280
I think the art of sale is quickly getting lost.
For example, a little qualifying on the part of the salesman.

I worked at GC in Chicago in the early '90s and almost laughed at James Iha of the Smashing Pumpkins for asking to play a TV yellow triple-pickup SG that was at the very top of the wall. He looked disheveled and I had no idea who he was....until I started asking him questions, specifically, what band are you in? When he answered, I got it down for him (assumption of funds on my part), he played it, he bought it, and he used it in the "Cherub Rock" video.
 

stevieboy

Clouds yell at me
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
37,590
Yeah, but isn't that the store that was in danger of going under so they were asking for donations to cover their costs?
No, that was Buffalo Brothers, Mandolin Brothers is on the opposite coast.
 

Seegs

Member
Messages
10,173
Nobodys buying a house here...it's a guitar not a house...guitar's are supposed to be picked up and played...that's just plain BS...

I go to two guys in my local store...if they are not there the others leave me alone...I can go into the high end room...pick up any guitar and plug into anything in the room...that's a store I will continue to buy from...

Chow,
Seegs
 

sixty2strat

Member
Messages
11,583
First.
It's only a Norlin...lol.
2nd 3500 is not a high price for an Arctop
3rd. If they are that afraid of a responsible looking middle aged male, who will they ever sell it to. As that seems the prime 175 market.
4th If they are that paranoid, the ought to offer to play it for the guy at the least.

A shop in Philly pulled the same stuff on me over an 1800.00 SG jr with changed parts. Guess if I'd been a hipster buying one of their retro cool guitars they'd been cool about it. They told me I had to buy it to try it. funny part was I had 4g's in my pocket and was coming from work so well dressed. I had bought a lot of stuff from them, Not bought at thing from them since 2006.
 

Jive Miguel

Senior Member
Messages
238
As a person who has worked in a music store I understand the merits of being customer friendly and letting them check out instruments. But there is a type of customer who has absolutely no intention of buying anything, and will suck your life and lively hood away trying out one instrument after another or A/Bing numerous pedals - All with the pretense that they're going to drop a bundle any minute.

They lack the awareness that normal people have that says, "I'm wasting his time and taking him away from paying customers who could really use the help." Between the kids who think a music store is a play ground, and old farts without money who just want to pontificate about 10k guitars they use to own back in the day, it gets tedious. A music store is a business, not a hang out.

I'll never understand the pathology that makes people shop without money. The same thing happens on car lots. My old buddy called those people, "Strokes." These people want to be treated like royalty right up until they walk away having not spent a dime. These people are very common in the sales arena.

But like I said, being customer friendly and helpful is still important.
 

Flyin' Brian

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
30,111
As a person who has worked in a music store I understand the merits of being customer friendly and letting them check out instruments. But there is a type of customer who has absolutely no intention of buying anything, and will suck your life and lively hood away trying out one instrument after another or A/Bing numerous pedals - All with the pretense that they're going to drop a bundle any minute.

They lack the awareness that normal people have that says, "I'm wasting his time and taking him away from paying customers who could really use the help." Between the kids who think a music store is a play ground, and old farts without money who just want to pontificate about 10k guitars they use to own back in the day, it gets tedious. A music store is a business, not a hang out.

I'll never understand the pathology that makes people shop without money. The same thing happens on car lots. My old buddy called those people, "Strokes." These people want to be treated like royalty right up until they walk away having not spent a dime. These people are very common in the sales arena.

But like I said, being customer friendly and helpful is still important.
:agree

Right on. Having also worked in a music store in the distant past, I concur and add that one of the reasons for misunderstandings is the lack of training of the employees and the subsequent inability of the employee to vet the "customer".
 

DewieCox

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,496
After picking up a sweet LP Custom in Triburst and seeing a huge paint chip on the top of the headstock, I think salesmen should be more particular about who they let play their instruments. It's a tricky situation, though, as money comes in all shapes, sizes and levels of disheveled ness.
 

gigs

Member
Messages
10,934
I've always felt that people should have to show proof of funds. No realtor would take you out without it. As guitars get handled they get bumped, scuffed and marked up. I can see both points of view. Ultimately you can shop elsewhere, their loss right?
Plenty of realtors show folks homes without a thorough financial background check. I've never had a realtor pre-screen my financials, ever. In addition, every Sunday there are Open Houses. It would be hilarious if they asked you at the door of an open house to show proof of funds before entering. Bad example to link to the topic, it actually makes a strong counter point to the point you are trying to make. A guitar store is an "open house" so to speak, there are no appts necessary.
 

Dexter.Sinister

Still breathing
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
6,909
Go to Mandolin Brothers, you can play ANYTHING, and that is how you run a business.
Yep! And they have EARNED some of my cash that way.

I understand the problems involved in retailing instruments; that is why developing relationships and rep is a good idea (on both sides of the exchange).
 

Jive Miguel

Senior Member
Messages
238
:agree

Right on. Having also worked in a music store in the distant past, I concur and add that one of the reasons for misunderstandings is the lack of training of the employees and the subsequent inability of the employee to vet the "customer".
While we're complaining don't get me started about the guy who plays the same loud five licks for an hour as if he was playing in a cone of silence. No awareness. It's amazing the lack of sensitivity to their surroundings people have.

And lastly, I know if I like a guitar within five minutes. It doesn't take an hour of self absorbed wanking.
 

gigs

Member
Messages
10,934
I always go guitar/music shopping with the cheapest clothes on I can find. It really gives me a great indication of the type of people I am dealing with.

For example, many years ago I went into a mom n pop guitar store. t-shirt, swim trunks, running shoes, no socks, I shave every day and my hair is short and grey. I've always loved the Gretch Country Gentleman and they had an orange one way up on the wall. I asked the guy, do you mind if I tried that out. He looked me up and down and said "Sorry, I only let people try if they are serious about buying it and can afford it." I said "Ok, see ya." He says... "I have plenty other guitars that are very affordable". I said, "I won't be back."

They were out of business not long after that. No surprise there.
 

Frank Prince

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,645
Never understood guys that worked at guitar stores and threw attitude. What is the upside of that, besides mistakenly thinking you are superior to people who might spend money at your place of business, lol?
 

Omega

Member
Messages
2,178
This is who I thought of as I read the OP's statement. Back in the early '90's I had the opportunity to go to Mandolin Bros. as I was working on Staten Is. Went to all the stores on Manhattan too but that's another story. Anyway, I spot this pre war D28 on the wall. I'm just droolin'. Stan Jay says take it down and play it. I told him I couldn't afford a guitar like that. He says no matter, I just want to see the look on your face when you hit that big old G chord. So I obliged him. He said, yeah, that's the look! Then he walked off and left me to it. I wore that guitar out for about 10 mins. I thanked him when I left. Great store and the owner is a class act.
Yes, Mandolin Brothers is a great store and Stan is a great guy. $30,000+ guitars sitting around with tags that say, "Please play me."
If he has something really special, he'll insist you play it even though you both know it may be WAY out of your league to buy (or even play). He'll want you to just to be able to say you did. It makes you want to give him business of any kind.
Off topic but his repair department is outstanding in my experience.
 

Mr.Hanky

Member
Messages
3,997
This is who I thought of as I read the OP's statement. Back in the early '90's I had the opportunity to go to Mandolin Bros. as I was working on Staten Is. Went to all the stores on Manhattan too but that's another story. Anyway, I spot this pre war D28 on the wall. I'm just droolin'. Stan Jay says take it down and play it. I told him I couldn't afford a guitar like that. He says no matter, I just want to see the look on your face when you hit that big old G chord. So I obliged him. He said, yeah, that's the look! Then he walked off and left me to it. I wore that guitar out for about 10 mins. I thanked him when I left. Great store and the owner is a class act.

Yeah, in all honesty Mandolin Bros. is the exception, not the rule.
I grew up on S.I. so I have been there many times and played some truly phenomenal instruments over the years.

I have also purchased 3 guitars from Stan over the years. The last one (my lovely Huss and Dalton OMC) was such a great experience. I played everything in that store, for hours. Had lunch at Denninos, came back, played some more and took the Huss home. For me, it was the greatest guitar in the store, and that is how I prefer to buy these days.
 

Luke

Senior Member
Messages
11,898
Yes, Mandolin Brothers is a great store and Stan is a great guy. $30,000+ guitars sitting around with tags that say, "Please play me."
If he has something really special, he'll insist you play it even though you both know it may be WAY out of your league to buy (or even play). He'll want you to just to be able to say you did. It makes you want to give him business of any kind.
Off topic but his repair department is outstanding in my experience.
And if you showed up at a Ferrari dealership like that, and you're not Sammy Hagar, do you think they'd let you take the latest car out for a spin?

You purposely project a negative and expect a positive response, puzzling.
 
Messages
6,148
LaVonnes in Savage, Minnesota was the one who insisted I (and everyone else who came into the door that day) try an old Martin that was sold to the store by the kids of the original owner who had passed away.

It was uncanny - that guitar you picked it up and kernels of songs would come pouring out of it. It was a songwriters dreams, I played it for 10 minutes and I wrote frameworks for half an album, in like (snap fingers) it was crazy.

Apparently the guitar had that effect on everyone who picked it up.

So yeah, I go to Lavonnes a lot because they seem to be cool if you just are window shopping and if you want to buy, well cool too.
 

markjsmith

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,627
Well I get the idea of the post, but here's the other side.

I worked in a store and a guy like yourself (40's and professional looking) would literally walk in and test drive every freakin guitar in the place almost every time he came in. He played OK, but had a huge ego about his playing and would never buy anything. One day he came in and apparently had a metal belt buckle and scratched (pretty badly in 2 cases) 5 guitars. Yes 5 guitars that the owner could now not sell as new. He lost money on every one of those sales. This douche even came in and tried to buy one of the guitars HE scratched and tried talking the already below cost price down even further (this was a $5k limited edition Martin that sold for less than half)! He didn't end up with it, but I still wanted to kill the guy.

Granted, I'd be bummed if I was told no as well but I always start with a conversation first about what I'm looking for and then ask. If it's on consignment ask them to call the owner for permission. If they want to sell the guitar they'll do it.
 




Trending Topics

Top