Being told NO in a music store.

SamBooka

Member
Messages
2,224
The frustrating part is that (ok.. here I vent again). This is NOT an archtop friendly market so when I find something I like that I dont have to order from ebay sight unseen it actually makes up for the price difference. (and yes.. it is norlin.. but oddly it didnt weigh a tonne.. sounded and felt pretty good and didnt have a skinny nut)

So now I have the dilema, I know I can clear the funds easily enough if I sell the guitars I wouldnt need but just on principal I dont want to shop there. It has only been in the store a couple of weeks
 

Luke

Senior Member
Messages
11,898
Well I get the idea of the post, but here's the other side.

I worked in a store and a guy like yourself (40's and professional looking) would literally walk in and test drive every freakin guitar in the place almost every time he came in. He played OK, but had a huge ego about his playing and would never buy anything. One day he came in and apparently had a metal belt buckle and scratched (pretty badly in 2 cases) 5 guitars. Yes 5 guitars that the owner could now not sell as new. He lost money on every one of those sales. This douche even came in and tried to buy one of the guitars HE scratched and tried talking the already below cost price down even further (this was a $5k limited edition Martin that sold for less than half)! He didn't end up with it, but I still wanted to kill the guy.

Granted, I'd be bummed if I was told no as well but I always start with a conversation first about what I'm looking for and then ask. If it's on consignment ask them to call the owner for permission. If they want to sell the guitar they'll do it.
A simple solution to such problems would be to insist customers remove all jewelry (including wedding rings) and have them wear one of these suede welding aprons:



It won't prevent pick scuffs, but it will dramatically reduce other wear.
 

Pat Healy

Member
Messages
10,954
They don't anywhere else either.
Sure they do. I do real estate, and I'd never take a buyer out without prequalification. Neither would anyone that I work with. It ends up being a complete waste of time. Around here, prequal - either verification of ability to get a mortgage or proof of cash funds - is standard practice.

However, it's not really a good analogy to the music store thing...I can't imagine being asked to show proof of funds in order to play a guitar. Also, stalking your customers and being a dick about playing the instruments is bad practice and a good way to be out of business. Personally I've never had anyone give me trouble about this or say I couldn't play an instrument. Pretty sure I'd never to back to a music store that conducted itself that way.
 

DonW

Velocity Town Angel
Double Platinum Member
Messages
5,468
My guitar shop employment was only a little over a year and the owner would have a select few high end guitars but he let everyone try what they wanted. The point that's missing here is that most shops have a woeful level of training. We had to be certain that belt buckles/jewelry etc. was in no way shape or form going to touch the guitar whatever the price point. When the customer was asked to ditch the jewelry or belt buckle to try the guitar 99% gladly agreed. Those that didn't weren't offended and were tire kicking so they moved on.

The owner was very cool but he knew the music instrument business having decades of experience. Shops that pass on teaching an employee to be alert in customer demos end up with damaged goods.
 

SamBooka

Member
Messages
2,224
I dont expect the guy in the shop to know (and assume he doesnt) but I worked in a guitar shop for almost 10 years. My boss had a saying "You scratch that and I'll scratch you!" So yeah.. coats off.. no zippers buckles etc. Even when using a pick remember "This is NOT your guitar.. treat it with respect"
 

Omega

Member
Messages
2,178
And if you showed up at a Ferrari dealership like that, and you're not Sammy Hagar, do you think they'd let you take the latest car out for a spin?

You purposely project a negative and expect a positive response, puzzling.
I don't understand. Do you have an issue with what I posted?
 

Flyin' Brian

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
30,113
While we're complaining don't get me started about the guy who plays the same loud five licks for an hour as if he was playing in a cone of silence. No awareness. It's amazing the lack of sensitivity to their surroundings people have.

And lastly, I know if I like a guitar within five minutes. It doesn't take an hour of self absorbed wanking.
Most people have a circle of awareness that extends no more than about 7 feet, whether it's wanking in a music store, taking a whole aisle up in a grocery store with 2 carts while they commiserate with friends or stopping at the end of an escalator to yak with relatives as they arrive in an airport.
 

fjblair

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
13,654
Then you must live in a different universe. Whenever I've called a realtor to see a home, one of the first things they ask is if you are "pre-approved" for the purchase amount. Meaning, you've applied for a mortgage and can borrow a specified amount. If you say "no" they might show you a few places, but they aren't taking you out to see twenty homes. They are not looking to run around to entertain people with homes they are unable to purchase.

A pre-approval letter is hardly "proof of funds" that you indicated. As a matter of a fact a pre-approval is worthless and the only time Realtors care generally is with first time home buyers. That is my universe.
 

fjblair

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
13,654
Sure they do. I do real estate, and I'd never take a buyer out without prequalification. Neither would anyone that I work with. It ends up being a complete waste of time. Around here, prequal - either verification of ability to get a mortgage or proof of cash funds - is standard practice.

However, it's not really a good analogy to the music store thing...I can't imagine being asked to show proof of funds in order to play a guitar. Also, stalking your customers and being a dick about playing the instruments is bad practice and a good way to be out of business. Personally I've never had anyone give me trouble about this or say I couldn't play an instrument. Pretty sure I'd never to back to a music store that conducted itself that way.

It is rarely done in NC. PQ letters are meaningless and I have never known an agent to ask for proof of funds from a cash buyer. The seller may request for such proof as a contingency once an offer is made in some cases.
 

Luke

Senior Member
Messages
11,898
A pre-approval letter is hardly "proof of funds" that you indicated. As a matter of a fact a pre-approval is worthless and the only time Realtors care generally is with first time home buyers. That is my universe.
You should read the rest of the thread.
 

Jive Miguel

Senior Member
Messages
238
Most people have a circle of awareness that extends no more than about 7 feet, whether it's wanking in a music store, taking a whole aisle up in a grocery store with 2 carts while they commiserate with friends or stopping at the end of an escalator to yak with relatives as they arrive in an airport.
I've seen horrible acts of inhumanity. If it's not long term wanking without a care in the world while butchering "Little Wing," it's people talking on cellphones in public places like they're the center of the universe.
 

Pat Healy

Member
Messages
10,954
It is rarely done in NC. PQ letters are meaningless and I have never known an agent to ask for proof of funds from a cash buyer. The seller may request for such proof as a contingency once an offer is made in some cases.
Geographical differences, I guess. In my experience, PQ letters are hardly meaningless...our instance of buyers failing to meet loan conditions is drastically reduced since we started that practice. Whatever, it's not important...we can stop derailing this critical topic now. ;)
 

Guitarworks

Member
Messages
10,410
By and large, guitar shops are anal about new merchandise or consigned merchandise, and if there is something they consider vintage, it gets more or less treated the same as an old rare piece of artwork - you will not breathe on it and only our staff is allowed to handle it with clean white gloves. Lots of people want to be 'tourists' and say "I got to play a pre-war Martin today!", or "I got to try out '58 Les Paul today!". I've found it's best to flat out ask the staff what the policy is on handling anything when you walk in the door, before you even spot something you want to test drive, and what proof do they need to see that you're a serious buyer if there's something you want to leave with that day.
 

Frank Prince

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,645
Well I get the idea of the post, but here's the other side.

I worked in a store and a guy like yourself (40's and professional looking) would literally walk in and test drive every freakin guitar in the place almost every time he came in. He played OK, but had a huge ego about his playing and would never buy anything. One day he came in and apparently had a metal belt buckle and scratched (pretty badly in 2 cases) 5 guitars. Yes 5 guitars that the owner could now not sell as new. He lost money on every one of those sales. This douche even came in and tried to buy one of the guitars HE scratched and tried talking the already below cost price down even further (this was a $5k limited edition Martin that sold for less than half)! He didn't end up with it, but I still wanted to kill the guy.

Granted, I'd be bummed if I was told no as well but I always start with a conversation first about what I'm looking for and then ask. If it's on consignment ask them to call the owner for permission. If they want to sell the guitar they'll do it.
Certainly these kind of people should be screened. I have no problem with this, but the ratio of guitar store employees who would take the time to explain this politely vs. the guys who act like superior jerks who wish you would stop bothering them is pretty low in my experience.

I had a guy one time tell me to stop playing because he had a really bad hangover, lol. Give me a break! :jo
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
21,645
When to a local music shop and saw a 79 ES175 CC (charlie christian) on the wall (next to a Super 400).

I am just not getting along with my ES165 and the 125 isnt much better. Nothing wrong with them, I just need a change.

So I asked the guy at the store to try it and he was "No, sorry. It's used and for sale on consignment."

... excuse me? Now, I am a male, 43yo, in my work clothes as a network admin (so a little too casual for business casual but close).

I am a little just WTF.. do I have to wave 4K around before I can even look at it (when he told me the price I said "too much.. these usually go for 3000-3500 max.. he checked and the correct price is 3600 but that is probably because of the wiggle room.)

But still .. WFT?

EDIT: The reason I mentioned the Super 400 because that is what I REALLY wanted to try but there is no way I can afford it so I didnt even bother so it is not like I was going for the most expensive guitar in the store. AND ANOTHER THING... when he did let me try it he says "I suppose you want to plug it into a fender.. " He was a little shocked when I said no.. even a decent bass amp will do. "A bass amp???" Just .. speechless.
Était-ce parce que vous n'avez pas comme en français?
 

ZeyerGTR

Member
Messages
3,811
5-6 years ago I bought my LP from George's specifically because, over the course of several trips over several months, one salesman got out the ladder and brought down a BUNCH of guitars for me to try out from Studios to Custom Shop LPs. He couldn't have been nicer. I think at some point he asked me what my price range was, but he was never pushy about it, and I appreciated that.

Eventually I found what I wanted and bought it. If he wasn't so accommodating I probably would have gone somewhere more convenient.
 
Last edited:

vintage66

Member
Messages
6,648
How do you show someone in a music store that you have funds? A credit card? Most people have one-it doesn't really seperate serious buyers from tire kickers. I go into guitar stores a lot with no specific plans to buy anything-just seeing what's there. If I find something I want that I can't justify buying maybe I'll buy and then sell something else, or do it in the reverse order. A lot of people are like that. I'm not sure what kind of test you'd want me to take at the door to see if I'm worthy of playing a guitar. Refusing to let me play one will almost certainly preclude any sales from happening.

I don't usually ask to see brand new high end guitars just for the sake of playing them-I do have respect for the store's inventory.
 




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