best advanced beginner/intermediate blues book

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by JHand, Dec 31, 2017.


  1. JHand

    JHand Member

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    So as the title foreshadows, I'm looking for an advanced beginner or intermediate blues book. If you guys have suggestions, I'd appreciate it.

    Slightly longer background: I'm to the point where I think I understand the basics of blues--the progressions, the pentatonic scales, the chords, the rythym, etc. And I've started learning what I assume are the intermediate lessons just by sort of poking around the internet. For example, the other day, I found a video lesson describing how you should target 3rds and 7ths on the changes. I fooled around with that a bit and now really think it added to my playing. But I imagine there are like twenty different things like that, and it'd be nice to have them all in one convenient paper or kindle-oriented package.

    I assume I'd be looking for a book that would collect advice on scales other than the pentatonic, when to play them, when to target or not target certain notes, etc. And hopefully it would also have some licks and some examples of standard rythym/frills stuff. And probably also a bunch of stuff that I probably can't anticipate since I don't know what I don't know.

    Thanks in advance ...
     
  2. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Recordings would be better but Google 'Keith Wyatt guitar books'.
     
  3. guitarno

    guitarno Supporting Member

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    One blues instructor on the internet that publishes a lot of material and who I think is worth following is Griff Hamlin. He has published a lot of material and is reputable and a pretty good instructor. http://www.griffhamlin.com/guitar-courses/

    Check him out - he may be helpful for you.
     
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  4. Buduranus2

    Buduranus2 Member

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    The blues is a deceptively difficult style. I look at it more like spoken language, with its own unique syntax and conventions. For example. someone could learn to speak a foreign language out of a book and it might be technically "correct." But to a native speaker it wouldn't be "right." This isn't to disparage books and other instructional resources, which can be immensely helpful. Rather, it's to emphasize that the blues is an expression of the feeling that preceded it. So while the spectrum of instructional resources are valuable to help us with ideas, you can't get the feeling from a book. What was it about the blues that spoke to you? That's the essence of what you want to express, and instructional resources are very helpful tools to learn licks, patterns and scales. But, just like we all have access to the same words, the goal is put them together to form meaningful sentences. I doubt that Wolf and Muddy, for examples, ever said the word "pentatonic" in their lives. But they are the essence of the blues. Interestingly, BB King was a "literate" musician who could read music and who understood chords. And you couldn't beat BB King as a singer, player or as a composer of countless enduring blues tunes. So theory and technique don't automatically make you less "authentic." Rather, they are additional colors that we can use to enhance and expand on the basics. So like one of the other posts suggested, find recordings of artists that reach you on some level and figure it out in conjunction with the many instructional resources that are available.
     
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  5. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    B.B. studied Schillinger books. That was probably a few decades after Beale Street.
     
  6. cmstrat

    cmstrat Member

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    Check out the series by John Ganapes "Blues you can use". I would suggest some dvd/streaming at True Fire more than a book, though
     
  7. stark

    stark Supporting Member

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    Transcribe a bunch of famous records. You might want to start with BB live at the regal.
     
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  8. Megatron

    Megatron Member

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    I use a few of his books with some of my students for some supplemental blues material.
     
  9. adorduan

    adorduan Member

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    Truefire has a sale, i think it ends today, all access pass for a year for $99. stupidly good deal.
     
  10. JHand

    JHand Member

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    Thanks guys. I ordered the blues you can use book. Will mess around with the free trial of truefire next ... And am starting live at the regal now.
     
  11. Megatron

    Megatron Member

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    That's a great deal. If I wasn't already Busy with so much other guitar stuff, I'd jump on that. It's been a few years since I last did TF.
     
  12. Mooselake

    Mooselake Member

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    Two books I really like are Blues Rhythm Guitar and Blues Guitar Soloing, both by Keith Wyatt. I've been working through the former since last January, and started the latter yesterday. The Blues You Can Use series is pretty good to, I've worked about 2/3-3/4 of the way through the first one.
     
  13. fr8_trane

    fr8_trane Member

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    Or live in Japan which is better IMO. ALOT more Peak BB guitar playing and less talking.
     

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