Best chord technique book?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by AaeCee, Jan 15, 2008.


  1. AaeCee

    AaeCee Member

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    I have been playing for about 3 years now, but gravitate toward single note lead lines, thus my chording ability is seriously lacking. My instructor refers to me as 'BB' as in King, as he exemplified that type of style (not that I'm anywhere near his ballpark!). Anyway, I want to concentrate on further developing my chording technique with work on progressions, etc. Anyone know of a good book in that area that is fun to use and covers both the blues and jazz spectrums? Thanks!
     
  2. spencerbk

    spencerbk Member

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    I bet I'll be the first of many to recommend Ted Greene's Chord Chemistry.

    Lots and lots and lots of ideas in there (though you certainly have to dig in on your own to maximize the benefit). A classic.
     
  3. Red Suede

    Red Suede Member

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    Check out Robben Ford's book "Rhythm Blues" for a lot of the hip blues inversions and feels.
     
  4. Tom Gross

    Tom Gross Member

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  5. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    The best chord books are books full of tunes.
     
  6. Elektrik_SIxx

    Elektrik_SIxx Member

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    Chord Chemistry is pretty involved and might turn you off if you're not yet already totally into chords. In your case, I would check out something like 'All Blues for Jazz Guitar' by Jim Ferguson. This is a complete and in-depth overview of comping styles in jazz-blues guitar.
     
  7. tacorivers

    tacorivers Silver Supporting Member

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    +1. Much better for me than the other suggestions (although they are all good books).
     
  8. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Ted Greene's Modern Chord Progressions.

    I recommend it b/c it starts out with common progressions, gives you tons of musical examples of those progressions that are full of great voicings. It also shows you how to move some notes around to embellish the transitions between chords. It's a hands-on book, more so than chord chemistry. Chord Chemistry is like a serious reference/study volume (with some hands-on too, but not as much as the other book). If you want to get up and running, you want some stuff you can use right now. Get them both, but you can start working out of MCP right away, then analyze it using CC.

    Best of luck!

    Dave
     
  9. Zelmo

    Zelmo Member

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    Agreed. It's very good. Note that there are a few books within that series. The one I expect you want is subtitled 'Comping Styles, Chords, and Grooves'.
     
  10. MartinPiana

    MartinPiana Supporting Member

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    +1 to this: "Chords & Progressions For Jazz & Popular Guitar" by Arnie Berle

    But more fun and likely to give you more new chords you can use immediately (although not presented as systematically as Berle's) is Jamey Aaebersold's Vol. 54 Maiden Voyage Guitar Voicings. Changes for a handful of standards, jazz tunes and blues. 5-10 choruses each song, different types of chords for each chorus. Accompanying CD, so you can hear what it sounds like, play along and/or improv over it.

    You can get a glimpse inside the book at the aabersold.com ... chord grids, tabs and old-fashioned music notation....
     
  11. rosscoep

    rosscoep Member

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    +1. I'm digging Howard Robert's guitar compendium as well.
     
  12. dorfmeister

    dorfmeister Member

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  13. countandduke

    countandduke Member

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    There's another one by Warren Nunes, but I forget the name of it. I will try to find a link to it and post it. Very thorough and thick...

    Chris

    Found it...it shows chord progressions too not just a bunch of chords. The same guy has a very thick chord "Bible" but this book is much different.

    http://www.boosey.com/pages/shop/product_detail.asp?id=925873
     
  14. AaeCee

    AaeCee Member

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    Knew I could depend on this bunch here! Thanks so much guys. Lots of great suggestions, and I really appreciate your disclosing your rationale for each particular choice. I'm in the process of checking them all out. Again, many thanks.
     
  15. Swain

    Swain Member

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    I think "PRAXIS: The Guitar Compendium" is an excellent set of books. But, they are a lifetime of study.

    Jim Ferguson's book/CDs are really good for learning some "Jazzier" versions of Blues tunes.

    Personally, I'd have your instructor teach you all about Diatonic Harmony, and Chord Scales. Once you get that, you'll be able to start constructing your own voicings, etc.

    Also, there are a bunch of good books available from National Summer Guitar Workshops.

    But, learning Diatonic Harmony is essential to progress. I'd strongly suggest that you go over that first.

    Either way, "Rock On, Rock Soldier!"
     
  16. Sid

    Sid Member

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    One of the best books out there imo(especially fitting your description) is Chord Factory by Jon Damian, he makes things easy....but that doesnt take away the amount of important knowledge in this book
     
  17. jazzguitarplay

    jazzguitarplay Member

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    Mickey Bakers books, and I like the Joe Pass Chord method cause he shows and covers many subs. Every one of the above is great. Chord chemistry is the ultimate resource but very intimidating. I so wish I could have taken private lessons with Ted Greene. He was a true chord God of the guitar
     
  18. jzguitar

    jzguitar Member

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    I've heard some good things about Scott Henderson's Jazz Guitar Chord System - AND it's only around $10. I'm actually going to order it today.
     
  19. Gene

    Gene Member

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    For jazz, I would transcribe the best piano players. Both comping and solo. Transcribe rhythm only if you can't hear the chords. Then work on your ear so you can hear them.

    I don't differentiate chords from single lines as such. I think them as melodies stacked on each other. All single note concepts apply to chordal playing.

    As for books, I think the Goodrick books are quite complete with the voicings. I think there are several volumes. But really, you can make up your own voicings just as easily and make your own book.
     
  20. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Great advice about transcribing piano. I keep meaning to do more of this.

    Were you referring to Goodrick's Voice Leading volumes?
     

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