Best finsh for a raw maple rosewood neck.

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by jalguitarman, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. jalguitarman

    jalguitarman Member

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    I am considering birchwood casey tru-oil or ReRanch nitro any suggestions advice or experiance to be shared???

    Thank you.
     
  2. jalguitarman

    jalguitarman Member

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  3. Mike9

    Mike9 Supporting Member

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    The oil will be less sticky feeling in hot weather. You can stain the back and headstock too if you want that vintage tint.
     
  4. zombiwoof

    zombiwoof Supporting Member

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    I've used Tung oil in the past and it made a nice, hard finish that felt great. With the oil finishes, you should re-apply about once a year to keep it sealed.

    Al
     
  5. Structo

    Structo Member

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    Tru Oil works great and is considered a hard finish.
    Warmoth now considers this a valid hard finish.
    I is a polyermized varnish.

    Many prefer it to a lacquered finish for the way it feels.
    It does not feel sticky like a lot of lacquered necks do.

    The secret to applying it is to do 6 to 9 thin coats. Rub it in with your fingers, the heat and friction from rubbing it in thins it and makes it flow better.
    But keep the coats thin so it will dry fast. You can apply three coats a day with a couple or three hours between coats.

    If you want a vintage tinted neck the way to achieve it is get some Stew Mac Colortone Vintage Amber stain. Mix it with water to the desired tint.

    You will want to raise the grain on the maple before staining. You do this by wetting the neck with a rag dampened with water. Let it dry then sand off the whiskers with 320. Repeat the wetting and sanding.
    Now when you wipe on the stain the grain should not raise.
    You can do successive wipes of the stain until the desired tint is obtained.
    Let it dry overnight, then begin with the Tru Oil.
    I mask off the top of the rosewood off with blue tape so the sides are exposed and get finished.

    You can steel wool the Tru Oil after the 4th coat has dried (overnight).
    This will smooth any runs or bits of lint that may have gotten on it.
    Wipe it down well and continue with the oil.

    After the 6th or 9th coat let it dry a couple days. Then steel wool it lightly.

    Then take a piece of old denim from jeans and burnish it by rubbing up and down briskly to smooth it and shine it.

    Then install your neck and enjoy the smooth, fast feel of it.

    You don't need to apply more in a year usually, it is fairly hard.
    But if you do wear it down it can be recoated anytime. Just make sure to clean it first.
     
  6. jalguitarman

    jalguitarman Member

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    If I decide to go with a laquer finish is there anything I can do to keep it from getting sticky feeling??? thanks all.
     
  7. Mike9

    Mike9 Supporting Member

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    Try an automotive clear acrylic lacquer - they dry harder and shrink less.
     
  8. Quarter

    Quarter Member

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    The sticky feeling can vary amongst different brands of lacquer and generally speaking, the over the counter rattle cans seem to be more on the sticky side of the equation, more plasticisers is my guess.

    Give the Tru Oil a try, it has a wonderful feel under the hand, is easy to apply, and very forgiving if you need to correct a mistake ... bonus points for not having to wait a month to cure like lacquer.
    As Structo pointed out, thin coats is the way to go. You can wipe it down with your fingers or I like to use a 2 x 2 swatch of old lint free t-shirt.
    You can do just a few coats for that raw wood feel or build it to a high level gloss.
     
  9. Hargrett

    Hargrett Member

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    FWIW, I've gotten good results by using light coats of gold-tinted spray lacquer intended for brass instrument repair (from http://www.ferreestools.com/ ) for "toning", followed by Stew Mac #3881 clear gloss lacquer. Also... polished with Meguiars Mirror Glaze #7 several weeks later.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2009

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