Best frequency to boost bass guitar for a power trio?

Achord

Member
Messages
142
I'm looking into an EQ pedal for bass guitar for a power trio setting. If there was any one frequency to give a boost to make up for the lack of keyboards or rhythm guitar (especially for when the lead guitar solos) which frequency would that be?

IE: 200hz? 400hz? Just asking.
 

202dy

Member
Messages
441
Boosting a frequency with EQ will not make up for a lack of instrumentation.

If you need to use EQ, the frequencies that will need to be boosted will be those that give the instrument increased clarity and definition so that it can occupy it's own space in the sonic mix. That is usually in the mid-range. It is also dependent on what the other instruments are doing and the room where all of this is currently happening. Which is to say, that each change, including or especially the room, will necessitate a change in EQ for the bass.
 

lostpoet2

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,295
All of them-just crank it up. I would actually consider an overdrive and an octave down pedal. For example, I would look at an EHX bass soul food and MXR bass octave deluxe.
 

202dy

Member
Messages
441
Why?

By the way, if you "crank up" all the frequencies you're right back where you started. Just louder. And usually less defined. Can you say, "Where did the bass go?"
 

sprag

Member
Messages
1,016
I like to boost 200hz for a fat punchy sound. I like to use OD when the guitarist solos and song feels like its missing something because he is no longer playing rhythm.
 

Floyd Eye

Member
Messages
13,838
Most important thing is to turn the guitar player's bass knob down, then break it off. After that you will be fine.


If you can't hear yourself, boost the low mids instead of the volume. Leave the EQ pedal at home.
 

slave

Member
Messages
857
I play in a power trio currently, in a stoner-rock kinda sound.
I tend to use drive's and fuzz a fair bit, I do a bit solo too, but I don't kick on pedals to cover for lack of rythym guitar.
Should the guitarist tear into a solo, I use this as an opportunity to play something completely different from the rest of the song - I'll change to something that will suit the drums/guitar, which typically prompts the drummer to change it up also. This will in turn make the guitar solo much more dynamic and interesting. Dynamics is what you should be aiming for.

You don't really NEED to boost any specific frequency, but I would suggest using a drive/OD or whatever other sort of effect might suit the moment.

It's more like Floyd Eye says, make sure your guitard isn't completely dominating the mix, so when they drop out to solo, the band sound doesn't drop away to nothing.
 

Floyd Eye

Member
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13,838
Would you care to offer a somewhat more articulate rebuttal?


Werd.


By the way, I have been a bassist in power trios for about 30 years now and I am only half joking when I say break off the guitarist's bass knob. The number one problem with most bass player's is volume, which is often caused by the guitar player stepping on the bass player's frequency range and then the bass player turning up the volume to compensate. If the guitar player's stay where they belong, a slight boost in the low mids is almost always more effective than increasing the volume.
 

Floyd Eye

Member
Messages
13,838
And a nice fuzz/OD/Distortion is great for filling out when the guitar player solos. I use a TAFM, but there are a lot of good ones. Pick one with a blend knob or separate clean and dirty knobs. Occasionally I have used an octave pedal, but it has to be the right song. Usually that just sounds bad. Speaking of which, I have an MXR BOD in immaculate condition if anyone is interested in a deal on one.
 

sprag

Member
Messages
1,016
try the mxr 6 or 10 band maybe the 10 is 18v… oh i checked, the mid selector on my main bass are 800hz and 250hz not 200hz so i actually boost at 250

plenty of boutique options available if your wallet can handle it
 

Dave M

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,763
Would you care to offer a somewhat more articulate rebuttal?

Sure. Since the original post is vaguely general, and short on a few important details, the responses seem a bit cliche-ish at best.
 

king_of_rats

Member
Messages
16
Know that problem ;) I play in a thrash metal band with one guitar, so I have to deliver enough "meat" for solo backing as well as replacing the rhythm guitar ...

Though I don't necessarily achieve that by special EQing ... My EQ settings actually are pretty standard. I boost around 200-400Hz for good punch, but turn back a little bit below that to give room for the kick. In the higher mids, I also turn back the EQ a bit to make room for the (lead) guitar. At around 5kHz, I boost my sound a little for definition and clarity of the bass lines. And I also push the mids at around 1kHz - but only 'cause I use the Atomic Amplifire right now with the US Clean guitar amp model. Boosting 1kHz makes it sound very "ampeggy" - with my Ampeg stack, there's no need for that ;) All in all: Low mid boost, not too much deep(er) bass, room in the higher mids for guitar, well defined high end, that's about it.

What really helps me compensating for a second guitar is a just slightly overdriven sound. Not yet distorted or fuzzy, just with some audible dirt. That helps a lot, more than EQing of a clean bass sound ever would!
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
37,110
You MUST eq the bass properly for it to sound good.
If the amp won't do it a pedal might well help.
Try something out.
Don't be surprised if it fails to 'make up' for other instrumentation or arrangement problems.
 

Floyd Eye

Member
Messages
13,838
What really helps me compensating for a second guitar is a just slightly overdriven sound. Not yet distorted or fuzzy, just with some audible dirt. That helps a lot, more than EQing of a clean bass sound ever would!


+1

Primarily I use a Spector NS4 through an SVT II ( non pro) Heritage 810 rig. The TAFM just comes on when extra brutality is necessary.
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,596
Should the guitarist tear into a solo, I use this as an opportunity to play something completely different from the rest of the song - I'll change to something that will suit the drums/guitar, which typically prompts the drummer to change it up also. This will in turn make the guitar solo much more dynamic and interesting. Dynamics is what you should be aiming for.
there it is.

don't play the same dumb line with a different pedal on, use some musicality.

the beauty of the 3-piece thing is that all three of you can "spread out" and play more interesting lines without stepping on anybody. that's how you "fill out" behind guitar solos, by the bass player and the drummer not being boring under there, and everybody listening to everybody else so it all holds together and makes sense even if it gets busy.

no EQ boost tricks needed, though a big meaty tone to start with always helps.
 

Floyd Eye

Member
Messages
13,838
That is almost always infeasible in a cover band situation. Sure you can add little things here and there as long as you aren't changing the hook, but I am usually doing that anyway, not just when the guitar is soloing.
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,596
That is almost always infeasible in a cover band situation. Sure you can add little things here and there as long as you aren't changing the hook, but I am usually doing that anyway, not just when the guitar is soloing.
yeah, if you're trying to put across a cover you don't want to go re-arranging it without some real thought, but good 3-piece songs will already sound right 3-piece as given.
 




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