Best instructional Material

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by PosterBoy, Apr 12, 2008.

  1. PosterBoy

    PosterBoy Member

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    Just wanted to get peoples opinions on the best instructional material out there for Practical theory/fretboard knowledge, technique, solo composition/licks.

    I've just come back to electric guitar after playing fingerstyle acoustic for ages and been thrust in a lead guitar position and I'm embarrassed with my playing skills, I need to do some serious study and practice!
     
  2. Elektrik_SIxx

    Elektrik_SIxx Member

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    If you're operating in the rockier side of things, then I'd suggest the Troy Stetina materials.
     
  3. PosterBoy

    PosterBoy Member

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    I've his speed mechanics in my amazon wish list
     
  4. Elektrik_SIxx

    Elektrik_SIxx Member

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    Depending on your skill level, I'd suggest going for the Lead guitar series first. Maybe go back as far as the Lead Guitar Primer. Troy's materials are fast paced so don't go for the top (which Speed Mechanics is) immediately.

    Fill it out with some Blues oriented soloing materials such as John Ganapes Blues You can Use (there are good alternatives too) and, while I don't have it yet, check out Brett Tagliarino (sp?) Guitar Fretboard Workbook for your fretboard orientation.
     
  5. Austinrocks

    Austinrocks Member

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    I have Troy Stetina's Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar, that is a great book, its one that you really want to spend a lot of time working through, its useles if you just read it and read one or two sections, it has a lot of developmental execises that you really need to do every day.

    As far as fretboard knowledge, I know every note on the fretboard, just draw it out a couple of times and you will also. I also know keys, and the notes in the chords, flash cards are good for that. Go through that and you will remember them, they should be automatic, I use the chords to determine the key, and from the key I know what notes I can play for solos, I really don't like patterns, the Major, Minor and Pentatonics I know, but really use them for safe notes, I really don't like being stuck in one spot on the guitar, and that is what patterns do, and I really don't have to remember patterns, the modes are automatic for me, just the notes in the key.

    a couple of good sites,

    this is one is good for the fretboard notes, the only error I have seen is the Harmonic Major is not the 3rd mode of the Harmonic Minor, its the Ionian Augmented, 1 2 3 4 #5 6 7, the notes are right the name is wrong.

    http://www.notesonstrings.com/#formula=1_3_5&key=D

    this test you fretboard knowledge
    http://www.francoisbrisson.com/fretboardwarrior//fretboard/fretboard.html
     
  6. Swain

    Swain Member

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    The Doug Doppler DVD is pretty good, for an overall "Workout" on the basics.
     
  7. shredtheater

    shredtheater Member

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    +1 on your approach. I think patterns are cool for technical reasons and its good to know a few off em but knowing your theory and notes on the guitar is much much better than memorising a bunch of patterns and connecting them. Certainly, as a player in the rock/metal/slight fusion vein i find this approach the best.

    Also Stetina's lead mechanics is ace. I spent a good couple of years with it when i started playing and even now i find some of the stuff useful if i feel my technique needs a polish. I would also recommend Petrucci's wild stringdom is you want a book with technique and some soloing concepts, however i may be biased as he is my favourite player. You could also try Guthrie govans creative guitar 1 and 2 is you wanna learn your shapes and improve your technique. I dont use it much myself but it is a good book if you want an overview off many techniques and all your caged stuff.
     
  8. PosterBoy

    PosterBoy Member

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    Thanks for your suggestions guys.

    I know my technique will take a while to get anywhere near good, but I'm willing to put the practice in and take it slowly.

    I love learning theory that can be applied to my playing, I ca'nt see my style being overly complex but I don't want to sound boring.

    Now I'll have to start listening to lots of great guitarists again to start stealing ideas to make my own!
     

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