Best tweed amp for jazz (and some blues)?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by Stephen Landry, Jan 16, 2006.


  1. Stephen Landry

    Stephen Landry Member

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    Any consensus on the best tweed amp for jazz? I'd like it to be able to do some good blues tones too, but can use a pedal or attenuator for that if necessary. This was brought up by listening to an album cut on a high-power tweed twin clone - love the tone, but don't really need the volume (unless nothing else competes with it tonally). Just wondering what else comes recommended for this style stuff.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. shallbe

    shallbe Deputy Plankspanker Gold Supporting Member

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    Vicky Double Deluxe. No need for an attenuator---breaks up at just the right spot for blues. Works great for jazz that is not too loud, since the clean headroom is somewhat limited.

    They used to and may still have one at MMI. I have one as well if you want to try it sometime.
     
  3. toddyjoe

    toddyjoe Member

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    I use a tweed 5E3 Deluxe of all things. Use the low #2 inputs rather than the high #1 inputs. Turn up the amp volume around 1/2 to 3/4 and roll back the guitar volume and/or tone as needed. I use P-90s on an Epiphone Casino to get great jazzy Grant Green and Kenny Burrell tones at living room volume. If I need a little more volume but still want that clean tone, I use different tubes (dual 12AY7s and 6L6s) and a bigger and cleaner speaker (15" JBL D-130).
     
  4. move

    move Member

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    right now i use a tweed super clone.

    the best sound i've had playing with a jazz group was through my freinds' '53 tweed super with an octal preamp section. spectacular dynamics.

    my other favorite is the high power twin. i like it at low volume.
     
  5. Robertito

    Robertito Member

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    The tweed Deluxe seems to have worked wonders for Rudy Van Gelder and the Blue Note guys that recorded at his studio.
     
  6. Ryguy

    Ryguy Supporting Member

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    I use a 5E3 for Jazz and Blues in small and medium size venues (electric and acoustic bass) and it is plenty loud for clean YMMV. Grant Green's Blue Note tone didn't suck. I often have to use an attenuator if I want to crank it. It has a Weber p12Q in it. Tube selections also help tremendously.
     
  7. pete kanaras

    pete kanaras Member

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    I use a tweed 5E3 Deluxe of all things. Use the low #2 inputs rather than the high #1 inputs. Turn up the amp volume around 1/2 to 3/4 and roll back the guitar volume and/or tone as needed

    bingo to all of that
     
  8. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny Member

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    stef,

    if you dont get a Clark, i'll be really sad.
     
  9. 57special

    57special Member

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    Tweed Pros are great (i'm partial to the TV Fronts, but they don't always have enough headroom), as are some 50's Gibsons . Louis electric amps have a terrific tweed sound, but have MV's, and extra gain if need be.
     
  10. BobbyRay

    BobbyRay Supporting Member

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    Depending on volume needs you may want to check out the Anthony Wilson model Clark! Designed specifically for a Jazzer, and made by Michael Clark. That's a tough one to beat. I've owned 2 Clarks and from what i've seen and comments by others, they are just about tops in tweed.

    If you need less headroom than a high powered tweed twin, but more than say a tweed 2X10 super, try the '57 RI Twin from fender. I love mine, and it has great headroom with 12AY7's (what they used in the 50's), or gets raunchy pretty quick with 12AX7's (stock from factory). Make sure you try a few, because I've heard that some are not quite right while others smoke. Mine, I'm told, smokes.
     
  11. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    I have a '54 Deluxe that's been fitted out with a Weber California 12 (paper dust cap)...

    That combination is just great, IMO...!
     
  12. 59burst

    59burst Gold Supporting Member

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    I picked one up recently and while it is stellar for jazz, it is really, really loud before there is any breakup. I did a blues gig at a small place, and it was only on 1.5 on the volume (with electric bass and moderate drummer). If you want break up from the amp, be warned - this little sucker is LOUD. I have a gig at a medium sized place in mid-February that I'll give it a go at to see what it is like opened up a little.

    The Clark tone floors me, it is superb.
     
  13. mad dog

    mad dog Silver Supporting Member

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    I'm playing one of those Clarks BobbyRay owned, the Tyger, and that Clark tone floors me too. I'm no jazz player, but have yet to hear a good tweed (my experience is with original fenders, Vicky's and now Clark) that wouldn't work for jazz. It's those tweed cleans, so rich and easy on the ears.

    Played a Vicky 35115 that sure would do the trick. Man, what a fat tone at reasonable volumes. Which one would be best depends on your taste and gigging situations. The multiple 10s of the Super of Bandmaster types are amazing on stage. Especially with P10Qs. Very lively, rich sound. For strictly jazz, I'd probably start with the deluxe or the pro. Somewhat rounder tones from the larger speakers. BTW, if you go Clark, get the 3-knob reverb. You will not regret it.
     
  14. cbpickin

    cbpickin Tweed Supporting Member Silver Supporting Member

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    I am so glad to read all of these posts. I have a new Clark Beaufort on the way that should arrive next week. Can't wait.
     
  15. Tag

    Tag Gold Supporting Member

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    Bruno Tweedy Pie 35. Maybe the best sounding amp I have ever played, but not a lot of headroom. Talk about sweet though!!:eek: :eek: :eek:
    It ripped a Victoria bassman clone a new arsehole.
     
  16. redtoploader

    redtoploader Member

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    Cmon, a deluxe for jazz? no way...not enough headroom there. Blues/rock sure, but jazz? In a real low volume situation sure...

    I'm surprised no one mentioned the 5E8-A low power twin. Huge output transformer to limit sag. That would be my pick if I was playing jazz. Pro would be my second choice.
     
  17. playon

    playon Supporting Member

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    That's what I was going to say... a '55 Tweed Pro is a great sound. A friend of mine had a minty TV front that had been gone thru by Gerald Weber. I brought over my ES-335 one time to check it out, it sounded like god. If you need more headroom, you can alway upgrade the speaker.
     

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