Best Windows based workstation program - NOT Pro Tools...?????

tms13pin

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,851
So those of you that do many tracks at once vs. just doing
one or two at a time, what's the largest number of simultaneous tracks you've been able to cut with these various programs?

I'm looking to dump 24-track analog stuff into my computer to mix,
and I need something that can handle that many input tracks
enabled at once, not just a stereo pair. I've got the interfaces,
but haven't tried this out yet as I don't currently have software
such that I can enable 24-tracks simultaneously.

This is an important feature for me, as I still like to do analog
tracking, and could see myself tracking some things in analog and
bouncing them into digi for mixing/dubs.

Can Cubase or Audition (or SONAR) handle this?

Samplitude looks great, but I think it's a bit out of my price
range, unless I can pick up a used copy of 7.x...



--Tom
 

Ed DeGenaro

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
23,945
Originally posted by tms13pin
So those of you that do many tracks at once vs. just doing
one or two at a time, what's the largest number of simultaneous tracks you've been able to cut with these various programs?

I'm looking to dump 24-track analog stuff into my computer to mix,
and I need something that can handle that many input tracks
enabled at once, not just a stereo pair. I've got the interfaces,
but haven't tried this out yet as I don't currently have software
such that I can enable 24-tracks simultaneously.

This is an important feature for me, as I still like to do analog
tracking, and could see myself tracking some things in analog and
bouncing them into digi for mixing/dubs.

Can Cubase or Audition (or SONAR) handle this?

Samplitude looks great, but I think it's a bit out of my price
range, unless I can pick up a used copy of 7.x...



--Tom
That really depends on your cpu...
Largest I had to deal with so far was 48 tracks.
 

tms13pin

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,851
Well, my CPU is 2.53 gig, it's plenty fast. I'm more concerned if
any of the software will *allow* me to ARM 24 tracks at once
(anything but pro-tools that is, as I don't have a mac or
Digidesign hardware). Can I actually arm and record multiple
tracks in these programs. I know I can MIX as many as I want,
but I need to capture 24 simultaneously.

Thanks.

--Tom
 

straticus

Member
Messages
3,101
You don't necessarily need a Mac and Digi hardware to use Pro Tools.

I can only speak for Samplitude because that's what I use. AFAIK there is no software limitation on how many tracks can be armed for recording at any one time.
 
Messages
2,176
Originally posted by tms13pin
Well, my CPU is 2.53 gig, it's plenty fast. I'm more concerned if
any of the software will *allow* me to ARM 24 tracks at once
(anything but pro-tools that is, as I don't have a mac or
Digidesign hardware). Can I actually arm and record multiple
tracks in these programs. I know I can MIX as many as I want,
but I need to capture 24 simultaneously.

I'm using a 2.4 ghz P4. In my current project there are three softsynths, seven midi tracks, and seven audio tracks. The percentage of cpu used floats at 11%-13% with the project loaded but not playing. While playing the usage fluctuates at 14%-17%. The software is Sonar4.

Audio tracks alone put little strain on the cpu. When softsynths and effects are piled on the usage can skyrocket. With your cpu you can easily record 24 tracks at once, but certain buffers tweaks might be necessary.

Arming 24 tracks successfully will depend on the number of channels provided by your soundcard. My card provides 10 available channels, but only eight of them are analogue, so I'm limited to recording eight analogue tracks at once.
 
Messages
728
There are many good systems available. The best IMO are
Samplitude/Sequoia, Nuendo and Pyramix. I use Nuendo
with Mytek converters, 4 Millennia Stt 1 channel strips,
1Millennia NSEQ mastering edition, 1 Millennia Twincom mastering
edition, 1 Manley Vari Mu mastering edition and 1 Manley Massive
Passive mastering edition. I use Wavelab for editing and
mastering. I'm running this on a 3.6ghz PC with the Lynx AES16
card, 2 UAD cards, 2 internal drives and 3 external 250 gig Lacie drives. I am using the Cui-Bono EDL Covert program
so I have no problem exchanging with pro-tool, sadie, sequoia
etc.... In the past 12 months I have had 27 albums enter the
Billboard charts that were edited and mastered and to some
degree, recorded & mixed on this system. By no means is the Billboard chart any indicator of real talent or quality but it does show that my system and both Nuendo and Wavelab can compete with anything out there. It's like an instrument. It only sounds as good as you make it sound.

I very rarely record more than 3 or 4 tracks at a time but I
have mixed songs with as many as 64 tracks. I am mostly
recording overdubs and fixes such as replacing bass, drums,
guitar, vocal tracks or whatever needs fixing and then mixing,
editing, mastering and assembling the final product.
 

dehughes

Member
Messages
1,156
Cliff.....great post, especially as I just e-mailed you regarding this stuff. :) So you prefer Nuendo over ProTools and Samplitude? Any particular reasons? I'm heavily leaning towards Samp 8.0 as it seems to be comprehensive and just all around great... Nuendo is out of my $$$ range, so it would have to be SX.

Thanks,


david
 
Messages
728
Nuendo is the platform that is closing in on pro tools
grip on the industry. Almost all major studios are adding
Nuendo stations. Wavelab and Nuendo have become the
industry standard in most every mastering and post house.
People like Bob Ludwig and facilities like Sterling Sound are
all running Nuendo/Wavelab as well as other applications.
Many "A" list producers have switched to Nuendo and
more are switching every day.

Again, in terms of midi support, Nuendo cannot be
touched. It has the best midi timing by a longshot
and it's midi editing and recording is the most intuitive
of any program available.


If you are recording properly, there should be absolutely
no coloration of the sound as you are taking in digital info
not audio once it's left your A/D. The people who are
hearing those differences have most likely passed that
digital info through a channel strip or some type of eq etc
in thier program and that would account for the difference
in sound. That is also the beauty of the Lynx sound cards.
They have their own routing system so you can bypass
anything and route anywhere without affecting the sound.

All of these programs have the ability to color and change
sounds. That is what they are designed to do. You must be
very careful and have a straight wire recording path so you
are not adding coloration while recording, unless you want
the coloration or processing at that point. Also, your converters
can drastically alter sound depending on the quality of the
converter and it's settings or options.

The people who say pogram X records better than program
Y are not realizing that program X might be the culprit who is
adding coloration. I have been recording, mixing and
mastering since 1975. I trust my ears as do many artists
whose careers are always on the line. Nuendo and Wavelab
are top line pro applications, as is Samplitude/Sequoia and
several others. It' really a matter of personal preference and
what features you need. At Sterling Sound, the #1
mastering facility in the world, you have engineers that are
running Nuendo & Wavelab, some who are still using the
last version of Sonic Solutions and one who is using
Sequoia. The engineer using Nuendo is not producing
more platinum albums than the person using Sequoia or
Sonic. They all sound great because the engineers know
how to use them and play them like an instrument. They are
all great programs in the hands of knowledgeable engineers.

Pick the one that has the features that you need, learn the program well. Try to push it's limits, and you will find things that the programmers who wrote the code were not aware of or
that at least were not in the manual.
 






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