Bigger effect on tone, what plugs into a pedal or what the pedal plugs into?

gtrmaestro

Member
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270
Just curious on what people's thoughts are on this.

Do you think that the guitar that plugs into the effect pedal is the primary factor in the performance of the pedal or is it the amp?

Obviously both are important, but which do you think holds more gravity in the effectiveness of a given pedal?


Actually I'm wondering what people's thoughts are on which is the more important piece of your total sound, the guitar or the amp. However this is an effects forum so I'll tailor the question towards the effect...
 

Clark GriswoId

Looks Great. Little Full, Lotta Sap.
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,957
I have a set of hotrodded humbuckers in my epi les paul 100, they are very hot.
I know i would have to completely change all of my pedal settings if i ran a classic humbucker- even a slight overwound set.

Same if i ran a solid state amp instead of tubes. My setup sounds different through my solid state.

Answer, IMO, yes, both ways, two way street, double headed coin.
 

MoonshineMan

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7,507
Depends on which pedals and which amps. A fuzz into a Fender makes a bigger difference than a reverb into a triple rec.
 

Modulator

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2,731
The chicken came before the egg, or did it?

On a serious note, I'd say it depends on so many factors, it's impossible to say. Eg. If you want a fuzzy sound, the pedal will be doing most the timbre work. If you want a compressed chicken picking sound, I'd say it's mostly the amp and guitar.
 

Gillespie1983

Member
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2,761
Just curious on what people's thoughts are on this.

Do you think that the guitar that plugs into the effect pedal is the primary factor in the performance of the pedal or is it the amp?
...

The guitar affects the effect, but the tonal differences are easy to anticipate. Les Paul + OD will be crunchier than the same OD with a vintage Strat. And the Strat may also enhance the pedal's highs.

But an effect affects the amp in ways that might not be easy to predict. Same OD with one amp can be warm goodness, but with another amp you can get trebly brashness. It could be fizzy or crunchy. This is why effect/amp discussions are more common than guitar/effect threads.

Watch this where they compare the Big Muff and Boss SD-1 through a Fender Twin and Marshall amps (listen from 5:45 to 11:30):
 
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-Empire

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5,975
Do you think that the guitar that plugs into the effect pedal is the primary factor in the performance of the pedal or is it the amp?

I don't see how the amp could influence how the pedal is operating, so I'd say the guitar would affect the pedal more. Different pedals will sound better doing what they do into different amps though. It's a complicated system and depends on the guitar, pedal, and amp.
 

DaveKS

Member
Messages
16,705
I think a good amp is more important than a good guitar to the overall sound.

Exactly, a bad amp/speaker is always going to sound bad, if that piece of puzzle is missing, everything is off.

But once you pass a certain threshold it all becomes about the total chain of events that you make happen in your signal chain by your choices. From the pick used to the speaker, we have control over those aspects of the sound.
 




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