Bit and Hz Recording Preferences

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by Adam79, May 1, 2016.

  1. Adam79

    Adam79 Member

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    I'm curious what your preferred Bit and Hz settings are when recording. I use 24bit and 44.1Hz. I use 44.1 because you have to go down to that level eventually, when bouncing, so what's the point? I've read various articles arguing both sides. One for higher Hz rates and others for 44.1, when recording. A big argument, in the articles, for the higher Hz rates say that for certain plugins, like Reverb/Echo, the decay rates are more articulated at higher Hz levels and actually translate when being brought back down during the bounce.

    -Adam
     
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  2. pbmw

    pbmw Member

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    I've also heard that the detail does translate going back down. I record to my HD24 at 24 bit and 44.1Hz and then send it to my DAW, where I can run it at higher resolution and do what I want
     
  3. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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  4. Timboguitar

    Timboguitar Member

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    This. Unless you're recording for video. Then 48/24.
     
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  5. rigg

    rigg Supporting Member

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    Can of worms opened here. The only consensus you are going to find is 24 bit is the way to go. Gives you tons of ceiling over the noise floor so you don't need to track levels at the edge of clipping like we did when 16 was the norm. Most will agree anything over 96k is pointless.

    Pros of 2x sample rates
    -Lower latency when tracking
    -Some convertors can sound better at higher sample rates
    -Some plugins sound better at higher rates (some argue this poor coding)
    -anti aliasing filter frequency can be pushed up farther away from audible range
    -Some people think it flat out sounds better

    Cons of 2x sample rates

    -Uses more processing power
    -Takes up more hard drive space
    -need to downsample for video/cd standards
    -inaudible high frequency content can cause intermodulation distortion in the audible range

    Modern convertor chips use oversampling which eases the anti-aliasing filter requirements and allows for a digital filter to be used. The knock on 44.1 was that its impossible to implement an adequate analog filter without creeping down into audible range. As I understand it, oversampling convertors have made this mostly a non factor.

    I work at 24/44.1 mostly because my computer is a bit long in the tooth but also because I've never personally heard any benefit to working at higher rates.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2016
  6. aleclee

    aleclee TGP Tech Wrangler Staff Member

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    Assuming that your hardware can keep up without increasing buffer size.
     
  7. TAVD

    TAVD Guitar Player Gold Supporting Member

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    24/88.2 or sometimes 24/48 if I'm doing some quickie MP3 demo. The Lynx Aurora seems to favor higher Fs.
     
  8. rigg

    rigg Supporting Member

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    true that
     
  9. Adam79

    Adam79 Member

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    When I want a mp3 file I use the converter built into Pro Tools. Are there better ones out there that can handle a higher Hz rate than 44.1? I'm not very familiar with how the conversions works, so sorry if this sounds dumb to some. Also, is mp4 now the standard? I'm way outta the loop with this stuff. Thanks.
     
  10. rigg

    rigg Supporting Member

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    I was discussing the Analog to Digital conversion process. The process of getting the mic/line/instrument signal into the computer. What you are talking about is file conversion. I'm sure the MP3 encoder in pro tools is just fine. I think most people work with .wav files.
     
  11. Adam79

    Adam79 Member

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    Right. Lemme phrase it this way.. Is there a max bit/Hz rate for a WAV and mp3 file? If so, is a mp4 higher than a mp3?
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2016
  12. Adam79

    Adam79 Member

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    That's interesting.. you actually track at 44.1 and then mix at a higher Hz rate. Is this solely for the plugin's benefit?
     
  13. Markdude

    Markdude Member

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    Most plugins can internally oversample, which prevents aliasing and negates the need to mix at higher sample rates. I do like recording at 96 KHz for the reduced latency though.
     
  14. pbmw

    pbmw Member

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    It's what "I" do. I'm not real knowledgable about digital, but I'm learning. I was told that my my daughter in laws brother who knows more about this stuff than I...
     
  15. rigg

    rigg Supporting Member

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    Sample Rate (hz), Bit Depth, and Bit Rate are different terms.

    Wikipedia will do a better job explaining it in depth than I can.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sampling_(signal_processing)#Sampling_rate

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_bit_depth

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bit_rate

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MP3

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MPEG-4_Part_14

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WAV
     
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  16. Adam79

    Adam79 Member

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    Ya, I realized that right after I posted that one and got all my answers. Thanks for the links tho.
     
  17. rumbletone

    rumbletone Silver Supporting Member

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    Keep in mind that some of us still use analog gear at mix down - on individual tracks and/or mix bus - which changes things a bit. Back when many digital multi track recorders were limited to 16-bit/44.1k it wasn't uncommon to use higher bit depth and sample rates for the stereo mix (i.e., when digitizing the stereo mix from the analog board, which often had analog bus comps, EQ, and fx auxes), then dither back to 16-bit at mastering. Whether it sounds noticeably better is a longer discussion.....

     
  18. +NRG

    +NRG Member

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    24-bit / 44.1 kHz
     
  19. cjcayea

    cjcayea cool as a cucumber in a bowl of hot sauce

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    I use 24/48 because I get the best latency that way.
     
  20. Adam79

    Adam79 Member

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    Speaking of dither, I only have the two dither plugins that come with PT, Dither and POW Dither, and the highest bit rate is 20bit. You'd think there'd be 24bit option. Do I just have outdated Dither plugs, or is there a reason for this?
     

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