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Blending the Major and Minor Pentatonic

gschmittling

Member
Messages
60


This is great for a ton of styles. Try seeing them as one giant scale. This is only one example, we can do this with every CAGED shape and scale pattern.
 
M

Member 995

The "giant scale" would be: 1 2 b3 3 4 5 6 b7. One can think of that in different ways. Mixolydian with an added b3 is one that might be useful. Some call it the bebop Dorian scale (Dorian with an added major third), though I've seen bebop Dorian as Dorian with an added major seventh.

You'll find a lot of players sneak the b5 in there, too.
 

Lephty

Member
Messages
1,588
It may just be a matter of semantics, but I kind of disagree that it should be viewed as "one big scale." Of course it is true in the sense that you want to know where all of those notes are. But to me, the major and minor pentatonics have very different sounds and functions, and to think of them as one big scale kind of blurs the distinction.
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
22,909
And it's kinda like saying "'I can put C major scale and a F# major scale together and o-lala have a chromatic scale'.
 

Lephty

Member
Messages
1,588
My response to the OP was intended to help clarify an idea he was trying to communicate in the lesson. I don't see the need to tear the poor guy to shreds.
 

ksandvik

Member
Messages
6,328
Kind of feel sad for the poor guy who did a free video for people to make their own judgements about.
 

gschmittling

Member
Messages
60
I don't take any criticism personally! Criticism is the only way you get better and I don't mind the critiques at all. I am a little surprised at the amount of attention this got... but hey, as it was stated... any publicity is good publicity! (Try the veal!!)

I agree with much of the ideas you guys said amount not the ideal way to think about playing "bluesy". Frankly, this lesson was targeted toward intermediate looking for a way to start expanding their vocabulary. It's not the way I personally think about things, but I think it's a fine way to start internalizing some of these concepts. I personally don't find complex scale terms to be very useful for those types students... putting it in terms and scale position they are familiar with seems a lot less daunting. What am I actually doing? Playing a Dorian scale with a major 3rd? A Mixolydian scale with a minor 3rd? Depends on the context... This was just an example of one way to start.

This is not suppose to be a magic ticket, rather a step in the direction for someone who isn't as familiar. I think with each step, things become clearer and this is an good step to reach to that understanding.

I appreciate all the comments and love the topics on here... many of you who responding are people whose posts/opinions I'm really familiar with and really respect!
 

stevel

Member
Messages
15,132
Just recently looking at one of Mark Wein's posts on scales, I was reminded with his use of the terms "Minor Blues Scale" and "Major Blues Scale" that there was one I've heard referred to in recent years as the "Composite Blues Scale" that seems to apply here.

The basic gist is Major and Minor Pent (with the inclusion of the b5 blue note) are combined:

C D E G A
+C Eb F G Bb
--------------------

C D Eb E F G A Bb

or, "The Composite Blues Scale". (F#/Gb is often included as well)

I do agree with the sentiment that there's a danger in presenting things like this as a "scale" because it's kind of abstracted from actual use. But we do do it all the time - historcially, Harmonic and Melodic minor were treated that way (leading ultimately to their adoption as stand-alone scales, and even though "misunderstood", have led to new musical inventions from this "incorrect" use), and things like "Bebop Minor" or "Bebop Major" have similar issues - you can't just run one of those scales up and down without a deeper understanding of how they're typically implemented. So I see nothing wrong with presenting the information in a manner that's accessible, familiar, and easy to remember (hey, you already know these two scales, so just put them together!), but the "disclaimer" about implementing them probably should be stressed equally, if not more.

Steve
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
22,909
things like "Bebop Minor" or "Bebop Major" have similar issues - you can't just run one of those scales up and down without a deeper understanding of how they're typically implemented. So I see nothing wrong with presenting the information in a manner that's accessible, familiar, and easy to remember (hey, you already know these two scales, so just put them together!), but the "disclaimer" about implementing them probably should be stressed equally, if not more.

Steve
Good point. I was shocked to find Bebop scales in Mozart's music. He must have been swingin'.
 

Razorface

Senior Member
Messages
993
You might as well say C, D dorian, E Phrygian....etc are all the same scale.

Completely missing the application.
 






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