Boomerang, next trouble shooting endeavor

flavaham

Member
Messages
1,866
Some of you may have seen my recent thread about having some problems with my new fuzz pedal. Well, I'm getting that straightened out. So, on to the next issue...

I have a Boomerang V1 that I got a while back. It is a tone sucker when it is in the full chain (usually at the end somewhere). I can't get good volume unity from it which is creating loops that break up and just don't sound natural.

I have a loop switch coming and plan to dedicate one loop to this pedal in hopes that I can get it to work for me. I'm not sure that it'll do the trick, so can anyone shed some like on why I'm having the issues with it that I am? Do I need a buffer before it? (Still don't really get the whole buffer thing but...I'm told that they can be a help for this kind of thing.)

Thanks!
 

elevenstrings

Member
Messages
693
I can't help with your issues, but if were me, I would put the original Boomerang on Reverb/Ebay and pick up a Ditto x2 or save up and upgrade to a Boomerang III. IMO, vIII is best looper out there for live looping, but I wouldn't bother with the v1.
 

flavaham

Member
Messages
1,866
have you messed with the input switch and trimmer?

I have. Haven't actually touched it for about a year though. I just couldn't get it to work in the chain. Hoping that the loop master switch will yield better results.

I will look into the other looper that @elevenstrings mentioned but I'm more using it to get backwards lines and things of that nature. Maybe it has those options?
 

goodhonk

Member
Messages
4,834
I have. Haven't actually touched it for about a year though. I just couldn't get it to work in the chain. Hoping that the loop master switch will yield better results.

I will look into the other looper that @elevenstrings mentioned but I'm more using it to get backwards lines and things of that nature. Maybe it has those options?

contact boomerang, they are very helpful and quick to respond.
 

ERGExplorer

Member
Messages
6,052
Some of you may have seen my recent thread about having some problems with my new fuzz pedal. Well, I'm getting that straightened out. So, on to the next issue...

That's the topic where you're having volume and tone issues resulting from running a fuzz pedal into two stacked Tubescreamers?

My first thought is that your signal chain is the issue. There have been other topics where people have blamed various loopers for deficiencies elsewhere in the signal chain. When advised to sort out the other issues, I seem to remember at least two occasions where people dug in their heels and refused to consider fixing the problematic signal feeding the looper(s).

So, first suggestion? Completely fix the problems which you already have before you add new complications.

I have a Boomerang V1 that I got a while back. It is a tone sucker when it is in the full chain (usually at the end somewhere). I can't get good volume unity from it which is creating loops that break up and just don't sound natural.

Once you've actually fixed the problems which are still pending in the other topic (you haven't posted an update to that effect, so I'm assuming you're atill working on it), the Boomerang V1 has a completely analog dry-through, but the two stacked TS9 pedals have buffers. Instead of "tone sucker," could you describe what difference in tone you're attributing to the Boomerang? Is it that the buffers are restoring the highs which you've previously lost to capacitance, making you think the accurate reproduction of your high end is actually the loss of the previous capacitance blanket which smothered the highs?

If you're mistakenly interpreting the accurate reproduction of your original signal post-buffer as "tone suck," and want to get rid of the highs which are finally audible, many amps and guitars from 1940 onwards have controls which allow tone adjustments. If you're lucky enough to have gear made after that, you might have such controls on the gear you're using.

Beyond that... It's fairly easy to get to unity on the Boomerang V1. From the manual:

"The IN/OUT LEVEL section does affect the sampled signal and must be adjusted to provide the optimum recording levels for the unit. The main input and output jacks can accommodate a wide variety of signal levels by adjusting the controls of this section. The INPUT LEVEL switch sets the general range of input sensitivity and the TRIM control adjusts sensitivity within that range. The LINE setting is the least sensitive, the INST (instrument) setting is more sensitive and the MIC (microphone) setting is the most sensitive. These controls should be set so that only occasional flickering of the CLIP LED occurs when the highest level signals are produced by the signal source."

I have a loop switch coming and plan to dedicate one loop to this pedal in hopes that I can get it to work for me. I'm not sure that it'll do the trick, so can anyone shed some like on why I'm having the issues with it that I am? Do I need a buffer before it? (Still don't really get the whole buffer thing but...I'm told that they can be a help for this kind of thing.)

To explain in general, the further a signal travels, the more opportunities exist to add capacitance which works as a high-end filter. A long cable can do this, as can a long chain of pedals.

To restore the signal to its original strength, buffers can be added to the signal chain.

Unfortunately, there are some pedals which rely on having a non-robust signal to get into territories coveted by their users. Fuzz pedals are the main group which is hugely sensitive to weak interactions, and people complain when the signal is strong enough (including after restoration by a buffer) that the sonic characteristics induced by working at the edge of failure never get invoked.

Just to get this out of the way, my suggestion is to out the Boomerang in your amp's effects loop. If your amp doesn't have an effects loop, put the noomerang at the end of your chain. Adjust the input switch and trimmer as outlined above to get the repeats at unity volume.

In fact, run the Boomerang aline, and set your unity for the unit's position (either in the effects loop or in front of the amp. Then, gradually add pedals and watch all the issues from your other topic slowly creep back in....
 

flavaham

Member
Messages
1,866
So you're saying I should put it at the end of the chain. Got it. Lol.

That's a lot to digest there but I'm quite sure I've gone through most of that trouble shooting in the past. I put it away because I couldn't dial it in. I can't fully commit to my chain being better than it was yet because I don't have the loop switch yet. For the most part I think it will help a few ways. At the end of the day I like the idea of having my guitar as close to the amp as possible so taking things out of the chain will be a start. I remember running just the guitar into the boomerang and having issues. I need to break it out again and see where all of that is at.
 

ERGExplorer

Member
Messages
6,052
From your initial description, it sounds like the input volume switch and trimmer haven't been set yet. The clipping LED indicator should flicker at hight input levels without going solid, just like setting your input levels when recording on a project, or even just duping an old school cassette mixtape. The sound breakup you mention sounds like your input is just dancing at a critical threshold, and that dance is being recorded and reproduced perfectly.

Once the input volume is sorted, then the output control will crank the level of the repeats.

That's why I'm curious as to what will happen when you run it by itself, adjusting the switch and trimmer to get unity with just a guitar. It either will work perfectly, or you'll post back saying that even with the switch and trimmer boosting your signal so high you can hear it on Mars, and the clipping LED shining like a supernova, and the output volume dimed, you just can't get unity on the repeats... then you'll know definitively that the unit is faulty.

I look forward to hearing what you found, either way.

If the adjustments work with just your guitar and amp, then round 2 will be adjusting the input gain for your full signal chain.

You haven't yet described the sound that you're referring to as "tone suck," incidentally. Is it the brighter high end which would be consistent with restoration of the actual high end previously smothered by capacitance?
 

flavaham

Member
Messages
1,866
I was inaccurate with my description. I haven't plugged this in for a year because I was getting bad results. The issue isn't tone suck. It is static. Sometimes just pressing a foot switch to start recording a loop causes a little static pop. When it does, that pop shows up in the loop. Sounds like garbage...other times it's what I play. There will be static along with a few notes.

I'm not sure if that's a fixable thing. I'm going to contact the company and see what they say. Maybe I can send it in and they can find the source of the static for me? Who knows.

Sorry to mislead here. I felt like the experience I was having with the fuzz was the same as this but not quite...
 




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