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Boomers: do you walk thru the concourse thinking our music needs a liitle break and maybe revision?

splatt

david torn / splattercell
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
26,458
primarily & finally, i just make music, even while the thought-bubbles fill themselves with fears & worries, excitement & titillations, nightmares & dreams of whatever:
simply making music.
 

dougb415

Member
Messages
9,849
Nope. Isn't "Smells Like Teen Spirit" 25 yrs old now? Qualifies for the Muzak interpretation.
 

sixty2strat

Member
Messages
12,392
Don't agree ...ate at an Indian Buffet the music was Ballywood Hip hop, Stopped in at my favorite bar and the bartender as much as I love her, she was playing 80's chick hits. seems I hear more current pop, that said I was in Dick's sporting goods and I heard Crossroads.....Which I have not played in 6 or 7 years nor heard in 5 at least on the radio. Honestly it sounded VERY FRESH. I think you just need some distance
 

Papanate

Member
Messages
19,822
That it's everywhere, unavoidale, and perhaps...we are not 'all that and a bag of chips'?? And, our point of musical view is seen like dad's '23 skidoo affinity?
Please ignore the narrow minded posters. I have had this thought running through
My head for years. I absolutely believe that oversaturation is the root of all music
Evil. Music is omnipresent - and even worse playlist are so non content rich and safe
that a large part of our musical lexicon has no meaningful impact anymore.

The cure to that malaise is to seek out the less familiar - get out of our collective
Comfort Zones and challenge our musical knowledge and work on expanding our
consciousness. And I also think we should all work on embracing silence as it
appears to me that collectively we have very little of that environment in our
Lives.
 

Echo Are

Member
Messages
2,653
This thread got me thinking that I can't remember the last time I heard any Muzak-type of background music in a store or other public place. At my local Trader Joe's it sounds like somebody's playing their Pandora station through the p.a. system. My local Kohl's has had AAA format tunes playing through their p.a. system every time I've been in there the last few years. I guess it's better overall than that Musak version of "Sunshine Of Your Love" that I heard in a grocery store circa 1985(I kid you not:roll).
 

loudboy

Member
Messages
27,312
Slightly off topic, but this is the standard response I give, when people make the attempt to compare classic rock to whatever was on the charts in the '20s and '30s, as far as relevance to today's music.

You didn't hear that stuff everywhere you went, in the '60s. Maybe on Lawrence Welk or something, but it had basically vanished from view. And when you did, it sounded quaint and dated, due to production techniques and general performance style.

Other than some rap, which itself has remained about the same for 25 years or so, most stuff sounds just about like everything else that's been made since the late '60s - production and arrangements for pop/rock songs have remained pretty static, other than "flavor of the decade" stuff like gated snares. You also hear it constantly, at stores, on TV, in movies, etc.
 

lhallam

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
17,435
I'll never forget hearing a saccharined version of a Jethro Tull tune on an elevator about 15 years ago. I recall thinking that my teenage music has jumped the shark.

I think these 70's classic rock stations need to play different cuts on the old releases as opposed to the same old hits. Last song on Steppenwolf's 1st release "The Ostrich" is as good or better than "Born To Be Wild" - I can go on.

As for music of today. Just like always there is some great stuff out there just as good as the 70's material and a little more refreshing.
 

TCMx3

Senior Member
Messages
2,505
Slightly off topic, but this is the standard response I give, when people make the attempt to compare classic rock to whatever was on the charts in the '20s and '30s, as far as relevance to today's music.

You didn't hear that stuff everywhere you went, in the '60s. Maybe on Lawrence Welk or something, but it had basically vanished from view. And when you did, it sounded quaint and dated, due to production techniques and general performance style.

Other than some rap, which itself has remained about the same for 25 years or so, most stuff sounds just about like everything else that's been made since the late '60s - production and arrangements for pop/rock songs have remained pretty static, other than "flavor of the decade" stuff like gated snares. You also hear it constantly, at stores, on TV, in movies, etc.
25 years ago was 1991, I dont know any big sellers in rap today that sound like NWA/Public Enemy/Tupac /Ice-T solo. Maybe I'm missing something but if you could please point me to some I'd love to hear it.

Today's rap music is great too but hip-hop and rap have converged back onto each other with a lot of outside influence ala The Life of Pablo, To Pimp a Butterfly, Blond, etc. really having a lot of instrumentation on them.
 

Tahitijack

Member
Messages
4,358
I asked former Starship lead guitarist Craig Chaquiso about this and he said it is wierd to hear himself playing as he moves through airports. He says Denver plays his music more than other places.
 

stevieboy

Clouds yell at me
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
38,285
One thread complains about older music, another starts by referring to George Michael who started in the 80s as "modern pop and R&B." :dunno

Music is music. Listen to what you like. I doubt if any of us are programming the music that gets played in the concourse.
 

splatt

david torn / splattercell
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
26,458
Please ignore the narrow minded posters. I have had this thought running through
My head for years. I absolutely believe that oversaturation is the root of all music
Evil. Music is omnipresent - and even worse playlist are so non content rich and safe
that a large part of our musical lexicon has no meaningful impact anymore.

The cure to that malaise is to seek out the less familiar - get out of our collective
Comfort Zones and challenge our musical knowledge and work on expanding our
consciousness. And I also think we should all work on embracing silence as it
appears to me that collectively we have very little of that environment in our
Lives.
agreed.

silence is beautiful, and it is the key to the heart & core of music; there is no music without silence, without silences of many kinds.
contemporary culture seems, generally, to fear, avoid & deny silence, which feelings seem to have become rote, de rigeur, "the way it is", etc.

maybe this began to really coalesce, at very least, near the beginnings of the "Industrial Revolution", and then swelled in further concert with the onslaught of the development of new technologies, truly global media & truly global distribution, etc.

but, it seems to me that --- not unlike actually choosing to make music --- we (as musicians, as individuals, as eventual communities-of-same) can highlight silence, celebrate it, encourage it, "create" it..... and we can choose to feature it in our own lives in a variety of ways, as well as selectively rejecting the pounding repetition of any musical sound used where it seems either inappropriate or pointless, regardless of the personal difficulties which will ensue.

just thinking out loud, there, but silently.
 
Last edited:

Dave2512

Member
Messages
5,792
I don't hear one type of music anywhere I go but for sure the MOR classic rock playlist is a staple in terrible chain restaurants that have TV's and serve BBQ bought from Sysco. I have a concert t-shirt I bought at Walmart just for dining at those places, I'd like a 20 oz Coors Light please.
 






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