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Boost first? Even before a reverb pedal?

bigben55

Member
Messages
2,899
Ive had several boosts and several reverb pedals over the years. I really love the ones I have now. I've also followed conventional pedal order wisdom and put the reverb pedal first on the board(closest to the amp, furthest from the guitar). I use a boost to simply "jack up" the volume a notch, for leads. Not as a "tone generator," though engaging it does push the amp into a bit more overdrive. With every boost/reverb combo I've tried, engaging the boost increases the reverb. Some have changed the Reverb's character; my current combo doesn't, but does increase the reverb. I'd rather in didn't increase the amount of reverb.

Before I take the board apart to rearrange pedals, figured I'd ask here. Anyone run boost (a clean 1 knob) then reverb? If so, tell me about it. If this isn't worth trying, tell me why.
 

Super Locrian

Member
Messages
1,507
Your terminology is opposite of the conventional. The signal travels from your strings to your amp, so first/before refers to what is closer to the source, not the amplifier.

As for boost placement, you can put it last in your effects chain if you want, I've used a Zvex SHO like this. Some place the boost earlier (or even first) in their effect chain, for instance to push overdrive pedals after it.
 

minty901

Member
Messages
2,124
you could get a boss ls2 and a reverb that allows 100% wet. put reverb in loop A, boost in loop B. run it in A+B mode. when you activate the boost it wont affect the signal going into the reverb.

naturally though, a louder sound should generate a louder reverb.
 

Ugly Bunny

Member
Messages
1,985
As you've discovered, time-based effects don't work in front of the amp at the same time that you're trying to use boosts and ODs for their conventional purposes.

Put the boost after the reverb if it's just a clean boost. Otherwise, put your most amp-like pedal before the reverb and your boost before that. In other words, you're just going to be goosing the pedal before the reverb. Basically, all of your OD will have to come from pedals, then you'll have your reverb, then all your clean boost after; just making sure you're not creating overdrive in your amp. If you wish to use a boost to goose your amp, then you'll need an amp with an FX loop so you can use ODs/boosts they way they were meant to be used and use all your time-based FX in the FX loop.

In short, while it is a viable option to run time-based effects into an overdriven amp, it's not the most desirable, which is why FX loops were created in the first place. Pete Thorn has a video about doing it - and while it sounds cool for what he's doing, I don't think it has a lot of application otherwise, but I'm not very creative. So yeah... don't goose your reverb pedal :)
 

bigben55

Member
Messages
2,899
I like simple amps; this one has no fx loop. I use 6 pedals with the amp: reverb, chorus, clean boost, a Timmy, a phaser and a wah, in that order. I use the amp 2 ways: 1. I get the amp cooking then guitar vol down to 7 for my mostly clean tone and use the Timmy to provide overdrive, boost for leads. Or 2. Guitar vol at 10, no Timmy, boost for leads.

The reverb is always on. The issue is much more noticeable with the amp cranking and the boost on. I'm indeed goosing the reverb pedal. Im gonna flip flop them, have boost then verb and see if that helps. thx
 
Messages
1,811
If you think of it terms of an amp circuit the reverb and modulation generally come after the preamp. From a pedal board perspective mod and reverb would go in the loop ( end of the amp circuit) that way your drive pushes the preamp and the reverb affects the finished product.

Since you don't have a loop I think the next best option is reverb at the end.

The only exceptions I've seen have been photocell uni-vibes.....for whatever reason the only place I've ever been able to put them is before drives.
 

MoonshineMan

Senior Member
Messages
7,506
As you've described, you use it to jack up volume, not generate tone. I'd put that boost as far back in the chain as possible. Make it the last pedal in the loop, if you can, with maybe only a volume pedal after it, if you use one.
 

tschelle668

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
482
Following conventional wisdom, I put my regular boost after time based effects. I have a SHO after delay/reverb. First in the signal chain is a treble boost. So I can boost the signal before it gets to the reverb, or after, depending on the what kind of sound I want. It works for me.
Guitar --> treble boost --> pitch & filter --> dirt --> delay & reverb --> SHO boost --> amp
 

Motterpaul

Tone is in the Ears
Messages
13,409
Although I firmly believe a reverb should go in the effects loop of an amp - so much so that I built an effects loop into my JCM800 just so I could add a spring reverb, if you do not want to use an effects loop I suggest either buying a basic amp with reverb included, or putting your pedals in this order:

Wah ( should always go first for impedance reasons),
Timmy,
phaser,
chorus,
reverb,
clean boost.

With the clean boost last you will not be pushing the reverb any harder just because you want a volume boost. This way you also have the choice of using either your phaser or chorus with or without the Timmy. No matter what you do, you will have reverb, and when you hit your clean boost you will just get more volume, not more reverb.
 

phazersonstun

Member
Messages
3,123
OP, I think your questions, responses & members answers may be misunderstood if you continue to refer to your signal chain backwards from how it's commonly done.

When folks here refer to the first pedal in their chain, it is the one that comes right after the guitar not the one right before the amp. It's done this way because that's the way the signal flows.
 

bigben55

Member
Messages
2,899
Wah ( should always go first for impedance reasons),
Timmy,
phaser,
chorus,
reverb,
clean boost.

With the clean boost last you will not be pushing the reverb any harder just because you want a volume boost. This way you also have the choice of using either your phaser or chorus with or without the Timmy. No matter what you do, you will have reverb, and when you hit your clean boost you will just get more volume, not more reverb.
Thanks, I will try that order and check back.

And yes, I did flub up the 'first/last" verbiage.
 

ColonelForbin

Member
Messages
1,947
Ive had several boosts and several reverb pedals over the years. I really love the ones I have now. I've also followed conventional pedal order wisdom and put the reverb pedal first on the board(closest to the amp, furthest from the guitar). I use a boost to simply "jack up" the volume a notch, for leads. Not as a "tone generator," though engaging it does push the amp into a bit more overdrive. With every boost/reverb combo I've tried, engaging the boost increases the reverb. Some have changed the Reverb's character; my current combo doesn't, but does increase the reverb. I'd rather in didn't increase the amount of reverb.

Before I take the board apart to rearrange pedals, figured I'd ask here. Anyone run boost (a clean 1 knob) then reverb? If so, tell me about it. If this isn't worth trying, tell me why.
Yes; but you are describing the signal chain backwards - the reverb would be described as the "last" on the board (IE, right before amp, or if possible, in the amp's fx loop)

"first" on the board would be what your guitar plugs into; fuzz, tuner, or wah most likely.

In terms of boost placement, I put my clean boost pedal last on both boards - literally, cable from boost pedal to front of amp, and reverb/delay in the amp fx loop.

On my small board, the first pedal is a germanium fuzz, IE, guitar > fuzz. On my bigger board, which uses a wireless, the first pedal is a volume pedal that converts the output to be 'fuzz friendly', so that one goes guitar> wireless > volume pedal > bubbletron > fuzz, and so on.

Placing a boost before dirt pedals increases the amount of gain/dirt; placing them after dirt acts as a clean boost. I've got a couple of other dirt pedals in the middle of things, that add some grit and dirt, but are mostly for gain staging boost (Timmy, OCD, and not yet arrived Keeley Super Phat). The big board uses a Fulltone 2B as fulltime buffer and clean boost. The smaller board uses a mini Keeley Katana as clean boost.
 

Cgkindler

Member
Messages
6,245
So, I've NEVER had anything AFTER my reverb.....maybe I've REALLY been doing it wrong?????

My boost is either the first pedal in the chain (acting as a tone sweetener/buffer) or after my dirt section....which is before ALL of the other effects like trem, rotary, delay verb (in that order actually).....

Like, here's my board last night (before I completely changed things around LOL)






Here's the signal....
 

MoonshineMan

Senior Member
Messages
7,506
So, I've NEVER had anything AFTER my reverb.....maybe I've REALLY been doing it wrong?????

My boost is either the first pedal in the chain (acting as a tone sweetener/buffer) or after my dirt section....which is before ALL of the other effects like trem, rotary, delay verb (in that order actually).....

Like, here's my board last night (before I completely changed things around LOL)






Here's the signal....
Like mentioned, where a clean boost goes really depends on what you want to do. Op wants to simply make it louder, not changing anything else. Depending on the input signal the reverb pedal can handle without distorting, you'll probably have to boost AFTER it to prevent the reverb pedal from clipping.
 

Cgkindler

Member
Messages
6,245
Like mentioned, where a clean boost goes really depends on what you want to do. Op wants to simply make it louder, not changing anything else. Depending on the input signal the reverb pedal can handle without distorting, you'll probably have to boost AFTER it to prevent the reverb pedal from clipping.

Right on....so, the next logical question is: can the BigSky handle a lot of input? In my experience, yes...but maybe I just don't know what to listen for!! lol
 

MoonshineMan

Senior Member
Messages
7,506
Right on....so, the next logical question is: can the BigSky handle a lot of input? In my experience, yes...but maybe I just don't know what to listen for!! lol
Like everything else, try it both ways. I imagine the BlueSky is set up to take line level stuff. I bet it's fine to boost into it, but it will effect (quite possibly positively) what comes out of it. It will hit the reverb effect harder, and you might get splash out of it (I've never played the BS or any Stymon) and much longer trails. Maybe that's good, maybe not. Sometimes too much reverb can cause mud, so maybe you just want the same amount of reverb but just louder, if this all makes sense.
 






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