Booster vs buffer question

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by Meriphew, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. Meriphew

    Meriphew Member

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    I currently use a VHT Valvulator as a buffer on my pedalboard (also use it to power a few pedals), and though it sounds great, it eats up too much room on my board. I was thinking about adding an Xotic EP Booster instead, though I'm not clear on whether the EP Booster is going to just increase my dB level, or if it actually functions as a buffer. Any info would be appeciated. Thx!
     
  2. Bufferz

    Bufferz Member

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    When its not bypassed - It will function as both a boost and a buffer.
     
  3. oldhousescott

    oldhousescott Silver Supporting Member

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    Also check out the NOC3 Earth Tone Boost and the T1M mini-buffer.
     
  4. Kelly

    Kelly Member

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    Fryette just announced an updated Valvulator at the Fryette Users forum.

    "The other new product is the Valvulator Pro - an updated Valvulator 1. More DC outs, 12VDC and 18VDC, high current 9VDC plus AC9 & AC12. The package dimension are modified too for a flat profile so it will fit under pedalboards that have space on the bottom side like pedaltrain, etc"
     
  5. chervokas

    chervokas Member

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    Well, the Valvulator is a little bit different, not just a buffer, its a preamp gain stage whose output is stepped back down to unity followed by a buffer stage, so it addresses the issue of loss of "responsiveness" and "feel" and it loads the guitar more like an amp than would an op-amp or discrete transistor buffer of a typical pedalboard sort. No matter what buffer you use of that type its not going to respond the same way the Valvulator does. The EP Booster has true bypass switching so, no, it will not function as a buffer when it's turned off. When it's turned on it will decouple the guitar from anything after it so it will buffer the guitar from the impedance of devices after it and from the capacitance of cable after it, but the output impedance is variable, I suppose based on how you have the gain knob set, so it may or may not be idea in terms of driving the next device in line (FWIW the output impedance of the Echoplex it's based on was fairly high and I think that was in part responsible for the sonic impact that some people seem to like of running that as a preamp, not just a delay).
     
  6. Whalestone

    Whalestone Member

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    Note that according to Xotic the output impedance of the EP Booster is a low 1kΩ.
     
  7. Bufferz

    Bufferz Member

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    Thanks, ep booster seems like a great buffer option as I understand many owners use it as an "always on" pedal first or last in the chain
     
  8. KevinFinn

    KevinFinn Member

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    Why not get the most underrated booster on the market? A pedal with a higher internal voltage so the boost is TRULY all clean and uncolored? A pedal that also buffs always, whether on or off. A pedal that kills radio signals so you have no RF interference ever?

    It may not be a TGP darling, but that doesn't mean it's not awesome.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZMXbNscf_A

    This demo is cool in that it highlights the usefulness of a Truetone either in front of an amp or in an effects loop. Because it's truly clean and transparent, it is much more versatile than other boosts. You can use it in the loop as a killer attenuator and still crank your volume. And you can use it to clamp a pesky presence frequency so your speakers don't reproduce it so much. You can use it in front as a stealthy volume DROP too, so that the off position is your fully cranked sound for soloing or choruses.

    You can also use it the traditional way - in front, boosting to taste, with an intuitive tone knob to make sure you're in the sweet spot.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2012
  9. chervokas

    chervokas Member

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    Yeah I saw that but they also said its variable but I don't know anything about the circuit so I dunno what the range is
     

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