Boss DM-2 as a reverb pedal?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by DSL74, Dec 7, 2016.

  1. DSL74

    DSL74 Member

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    Perhaps a dumb question, but heard of guys using delay pedals in lieu of a reverb pedal. So has anyone had success using a Boss DM-2 as a substitute for a reverb? If yes, what is the best way to set the controls?
     
  2. ThinPaperWings

    ThinPaperWings Member

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    Slapback would be very short times (probably 9:00?), a single repeat.

    Generally to approximate reverb you want fairly low mix and a modest amount of repeats, between 100ms-400 ms. The point is really to get some ambience and give the instrument some context, not to necessarily have a sound that is exactly like reverb.
     
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  3. ssonar

    ssonar Member

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    It can get verb-y, in an oldskool lo-fi way. I've had the Waza version for about a month & I like it so much more than I thought I would.
     
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  4. broken_sound

    broken_sound Silver Supporting Member

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    Essentially what @ThinPaperWings said.

    I used to use a Timefactor for a touch of reverb live. You need to set the repeat rate on the short end, up the echo, and roll back the intensity.
     
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  5. wyatt

    wyatt Member

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    +1

    Slapback is typically in the <100ms range , one repeat. Mix ratio depends on whether you want a little wet or "Sun Studio."

    It's how I use my original DM-2. It can be more controllable than reverb when used live and, because it's only one repeat, it can be used in front of an overdriven amp (even high gain) without turning to sonic mud. Many of those famous guitar heroes from Harrison to Beck to Gilmour to Knopfler relied more on delay. For instance Sultans of Swing...super short delay, lots of repeats.
     
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  6. DSL74

    DSL74 Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I have tried several reverb pedals, (the ones I could afford anyway, $150 or less), and didn't like any of them. Plan on using a Belle Epoch going into the DM-2 set for a reverb type of sound.
     
  7. jimmyj

    jimmyj Member

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    I'm going back to using a delay instead of reverb. I used a DD-2 for years with my non-reverb Marshall Bluesbreaker RI. I've been using a non-reverb Top Hat for about 10 years and started occasionally using a TC Hall of Fame about 2years ago.

    I feel like reverb clogs up the sound too much on my amp when it's really pushing hard. All the above advice about short delay and slapback is right on and I'm going to try that slapback on some tunes.

    Another thing I like to do is set the time about 300-350 ms and maybe 3 repeats at the most. It seems like the added space between the note and the repeats keeps it from getting too messy when I'm pushing the amp.
    One time years ago I was in a studio to play on a friend's songs and I loved how the engineer made my guitar sound for playing on a ballad. He said he had 1 delay at 325ms and reverb on the delay but not the original note. I even started using 2 amps so I could do that with a band. It was kind of like a scaled down version of Pat Metheny's 3 amp/2 Lexicon rig but not so much a big wash of sound. Eventually I just quit using the second amp and never missed the reverb but I still like that length of delay for adding some space without clutter.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2016
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  8. TheoDog

    TheoDog Silver Supporting Member

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    With a good analog delay, I like to set the feedback just near where oscillation might get going and then back off the mix. There usually a little sweet spot where it functions as a delay, but let's the space fill up with fading feedback.
     
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  9. ChampReverb

    ChampReverb Silver Supporting Member

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    I used a Skreddy Echo in lieu of a reverb pedal for about a year. Definitely a bit different than reverb but it worked.

    -bEn r.
     
  10. jamester

    jamester Silver Supporting Member

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    I go back and forth, but ideally I like a mix of both. Note that I play mostly clean or semi-clean, it's a different situation for those who play with moderate to heavy gain as their main sound. For live use I like to have moderate reverb, with a very low level echo basically enhancing and extending the reverb effect. Really fills the mix in a trio situation. But for home use and quiet practice I find the echos distracting, so I just use reverb mixed very low.
     
  11. UrbanHymns

    UrbanHymns Supporting Member

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    Thanks for sharing this. I must be hearing this trick all the time. I've heard so many records where there doesn't seem to be any effects on the guitar, yet it doesn't sound dry and lifeless. John Mayer solos come to mind.

    Personally, I struggled for years to find the right balance between dry, delay, and reverb. If I didn't use any delay or reverb, my signal sounded lifeless and dull. I like a little shimmer at the end of my strum. But if I used too much, things got muddy. It wasn't until the last year or so that I found the right mix: a little analog delay at 300ms, low mix, but 4-5 repeats. And my amp's reverb is always on just a little too. I've listened to live recordings of our band. You can tell there's something there - a bit of ambience - but can't hear the delay effect. Works great for rhythm and doesn't get too muddy.

    The game changer for me was finding an analog delay that didn't have heavy repeats. The Deluxe Memory Man was it. Now I use a Tonal Recall. I've owned the DM-2 more than once, but I find that an analog delay with a touch of modulation makes all the difference.
     
  12. jimmyj

    jimmyj Member

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    Kind of a coincidence but I was just looking at a thread about Beano boosts and someone mentioned that Marc Ford was using a Deep Blue Delay on his board. There was a picture of his board and it was set just how we are discussing. The level, and repeats are set low with the delay speed about 350 ms. The DBD only goes up to 400ms so it's easy to see in the pic because it's at about 3 o'clock while the other 2 knobs are at about 9 o'clock.
     
  13. Killshakes

    Killshakes Member

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    The A999 is the only delay I've been able to use this way. The DM-2 wasn't so hot at it.
     
  14. jamester

    jamester Silver Supporting Member

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    Interesting, that's kind of how I feel about my ML Jr...the repeats are too present, doesn't really melt into the background. I actually prefer the analog mode of my DD-7 for this, it is softer and really blends in as it fades out.

    I was assuming the DM-2w would be great for this, and was planning on picking one up eventually; any more thoughts would be appreciated (and good for the discussion!)...
     
  15. jimmyj

    jimmyj Member

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    I guess I didn't mention in this thread that the reason I was interested in the fact that MF was using a Mad Professor Deep Blue Delay is because I just bought one last week.
    I haven't had a ton of experience with delays but I did have a chance to a/b this Deep Blue Delay with an older MIJ Boss DD-3 for a couple of hours this weekend. One thing I definitely noticed is that if I set them up with the same delay time, level, and repeats is that the repeats are softer on the DBD.
     
  16. ummohyeah

    ummohyeah Member

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    You can use the DM-2 to add some ambience, sure, but it will still always sound more like an echo than a reverb... It's a great sounding delay pedal, one of the best I've ever had. But I don't think it will ever give you the feeling of a spring, or simulating room reverb of any sort, which is what reverb pedals are useful for.

    For ambient controls on the DM-2, I'd set the Repeat Rate very low, the Intensity just below oscillation, and the echo at 9 o'clock or so. The longer you can get it to trail on without sounding like a repeat, the more closely it will function as a reverb.
     
  17. drbob1

    drbob1 Silver Supporting Member

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    Break out of the mold!!!! Buy a Realistic "Reverb"! It's a plastic box with RCA connectors for adding "reverb" to a mono hi-fi source. It uses the MN3011 chip with several different taps to create a delay version of reverb which has the percussive character of delay but less stark than a single tap from a DM2. You can also overdrive it as a silicon fuzz. Best part? $35 all day long.
     
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  18. UrbanHymns

    UrbanHymns Supporting Member

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    Next to the DMM, the DBD is my favorite Delay. Haven't had one on my board in a while, but its repeats fade into oblivion oh so nicely.
     
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  19. mici

    mici Member

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    I will not speak for DM-2 because I do not have one but I can tell you my story about how I reformed myself from reverb into "analog delay as reverb":

    Since my Orange TH30 head has no reverb in it, I've always been a reverb pedal user just to add small amount of space and spirit into my tone. Tried lots of mid-budget units: Boss RV-3/RV-5/RV-6, EHX Holy Grail (older one and nano), TC HoF - they sound really great as far as I played in bedroom but in a band situation they used to flatten tone and make things sound quite artifical. Because of that I got rid of all my reverbs and purchased MXR Carbon Copy.

    That thing sits just perfectly in the mix, there is no other delay pedal which works that great as a subtle background fill. My settings, which give that space and ambient atmosphere that perhaps you are trying to achieve, are:

    Regen 9 o'clock
    Mix: 2 o'clock
    Delay: 2 o'clock

    I don't know a lot about tech stuff, but both DM-2 and CC are oldschool analog units so they might be quite close to each other.
     
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  20. saltbird

    saltbird Member

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    You can of course use delay to add ambience. A shorter slapback delay can sound very much like certain small rooms. Long delays will obviously sound less organic than reverb because of the obvious separation between repeats.

    Delay is frequently used instead of reverb on studio recordings to add space. This is because it retains the punchiness and clarity of your dry signal more, much like adding predelay to a reverb. Reverb is a delicate dance when recording because the more you add, the further back it puts your sound, naturally reducing presence.

    It's easier to get away with using lots of reverb in a live setting because you're not fighting limited headroom like on a recording.

    Long story short, delay can be used to get "reverb."
     
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