BOSS KATANA 刀 amplifiers

Moodion

Member
Messages
1
Hi all proud owner of a Katana Head, haven't used it in some time due to health issues. The new firmware has a lot of great features for me but I rely on the floorboard editor to make my patches. Can anyone tell me what the state of the floorboard editor is with the newest firmware? Been trying to catch up on this thread but...it is huge ;)
 

gumtown

Member
Messages
1,889
Can anyone tell me what the state of the floorboard editor is with the newest firmware? Been trying to catch up on this thread but...it is huge ;)
Firmware 1 version of FXFloorBoard will work with the FW2 version of Katana, but obviously does not have the new effects or extra channels.

FW2 version of FxFloorBoard is still on it's way.
 

soulman969

Member
Messages
3,652
On the subject of the Presence knob, does anyone else find it incredibly subtle, to the point where it doesn't really seem to be doing anything?

It's certainly nothing like the effect the Presence control has on a Marshall plexi for instance.
This piece from Fender Tech Talk might help to better understand it's function and why it would be more noticeable on a high gain amp like a Plexi. It's far more subtle playing clean and at lower volumes and has great impact at higher volume and gain settings. It also controls a much narrower band of frequencies in the high mids.

Link: http://www2.fender.com/experience/tech-talk/presence-control/

Amps

The “Presence” Control
Written by Jeff Owens on December 26, 2015

“Presence” control knob on a modern ’59 Bassman LTD.

For those who are wondering what the “presence”control on a guitar amplifier does, here’s the answer:

It controls “presence.”

More specifically, your amp’s presence control boosts upper-mid and treble frequencies in a specific manner that makes the tone sound notably livelier; a little “wilder” than normal. The quality of this livelier, wilder tone is typically described as being more “present,” thus the name.

Saying that the upper-mid and treble frequencies become more present doesn’t exactly mean they become “louder” in the sense that an amp’s volume control affects all frequencies evenly. Nor does the presence control affect the tone in the same manner as the amp’s “mid” and “treble” tone controls.

To explain what a presence control does in greater detail, let us note a fundamental basic of amplifier design. Namely, that an amp consists of at least two “sections”—a preamp stage and a power amp stage. The preamp stage comes first and is where most of the tone shaping happens; the power amp stage comes second and provides the muscle that blasts your sound out into the world and makes the neighbors call the cops.

Your amp’s traditional tone controls—“bass,” “mid” and “treble”—reside in the preamp stage and thus accomplish their work before the signal reaches the power amp. These tone controls are generally “subtractive”—that is, they don’t boost anything; they control the amount of frequency band removed from the signal.

The presence control, on the other hand, resides in the power amp stage. Technically, it’s a “high frequency shelving boost” control, which is much like the treble control on a traditional stereo. Turning it up actually does boost part of the frequency band.

Here’s where things get a little complicated, but hang in there with us. Because of the nature of power amp design and function (specifically power amp feedback, the science of which fills volumes if not entire libraries) the presence control affects upper-mid and high frequencies in a completely different way that than the normal tone controls found in the preamp stage.

Increasing the presence control decreases high-frequency-only feedback in the power amp, which makes the amp distort more easily for higher notes. Also, it decreases the amp’s ability to precisely control the actual speaker cone at high frequencies—this is what makes the amp sound wilder and raspier in a way that the treble control knob isn’t capable of.

When playing an amp cleanly, increasing the presence control simply results in more upper midrange and treble.

When pushing an amp into distortion, though, the presence control behaves differently. It changes the “texture” of the distortion and adds complexity to the sound, making the amp feel a little “less predictable” for higher notes.

As you can see then, the function of the presence control varies with volume. The louder you play, the more it does and the more noticeable it becomes.
 

Zalu

Supporting Member
Messages
562
Just added a Red Zen drive to my board. Tried it using the stock clean and the Sneaky Clean Twin and a Keeley Hooke Reverb (Kat 50, so reverb is in front of the amp, last in line of my pedals). Sounds great. The clean twin gets a little extra noise than the stock clean does, but I think it sounds a touch fuller.
I just did this yesterday as well. I tried it with a few of the Sneaky Amps - the Vox & Matchless models sounded OK with it, but the BR Tweed sounds killer with the Red Zen!!
 

=JL=

Member
Messages
984
This piece from Fender Tech Talk might help to better understand it's function and why it would be more noticeable on a high gain amp like a Plexi. It's far more subtle playing clean and at lower volumes and has great impact at higher volume and gain settings. It also controls a much narrower band of frequencies in the high mids.

Link: http://www2.fender.com/experience/tech-talk/presence-control/

Amps

The “Presence” Control
Written by Jeff Owens on December 26, 2015

“Presence” control knob on a modern ’59 Bassman LTD.

For those who are wondering what the “presence”control on a guitar amplifier does, here’s the answer:

It controls “presence.”

More specifically, your amp’s presence control boosts upper-mid and treble frequencies in a specific manner that makes the tone sound notably livelier; a little “wilder” than normal. The quality of this livelier, wilder tone is typically described as being more “present,” thus the name.

Saying that the upper-mid and treble frequencies become more present doesn’t exactly mean they become “louder” in the sense that an amp’s volume control affects all frequencies evenly. Nor does the presence control affect the tone in the same manner as the amp’s “mid” and “treble” tone controls.

To explain what a presence control does in greater detail, let us note a fundamental basic of amplifier design. Namely, that an amp consists of at least two “sections”—a preamp stage and a power amp stage. The preamp stage comes first and is where most of the tone shaping happens; the power amp stage comes second and provides the muscle that blasts your sound out into the world and makes the neighbors call the cops.

Your amp’s traditional tone controls—“bass,” “mid” and “treble”—reside in the preamp stage and thus accomplish their work before the signal reaches the power amp. These tone controls are generally “subtractive”—that is, they don’t boost anything; they control the amount of frequency band removed from the signal.

The presence control, on the other hand, resides in the power amp stage. Technically, it’s a “high frequency shelving boost” control, which is much like the treble control on a traditional stereo. Turning it up actually does boost part of the frequency band.

Here’s where things get a little complicated, but hang in there with us. Because of the nature of power amp design and function (specifically power amp feedback, the science of which fills volumes if not entire libraries) the presence control affects upper-mid and high frequencies in a completely different way that than the normal tone controls found in the preamp stage.

Increasing the presence control decreases high-frequency-only feedback in the power amp, which makes the amp distort more easily for higher notes. Also, it decreases the amp’s ability to precisely control the actual speaker cone at high frequencies—this is what makes the amp sound wilder and raspier in a way that the treble control knob isn’t capable of.

When playing an amp cleanly, increasing the presence control simply results in more upper midrange and treble.

When pushing an amp into distortion, though, the presence control behaves differently. It changes the “texture” of the distortion and adds complexity to the sound, making the amp feel a little “less predictable” for higher notes.

As you can see then, the function of the presence control varies with volume. The louder you play, the more it does and the more noticeable it becomes.
Yes I realise all that, and have spent years fine-tuning NFB resistors in Fender amps with no presence control, and have added them to some amps too.

I know what they are and what they do, and the Katana just doesn't. A global taming or boosting of those frequencies on the front panel (as opposed to in software) would've been very welcome for gigging, but the difference between zero and ten is about the same as between five and five-three-eighths on a conventional amp.

I like the amp, but it's a missed opportunity IMO for global venue compensation on an amp which has multiple stored patches, without having to bring a Macbook.
 

Joeblues27

Member
Messages
193
Unable to get my Katana 50 updated or the drivers installed properly! I have downloaded them too many times. I'm about ready to throw the amp in a dumpster!
 

soulman969

Member
Messages
3,652
Yes I realise all that, and have spent years fine-tuning NFB resistors in Fender amps with no presence control, and have added them to some amps too.

I know what they are and what they do, and the Katana just doesn't. A global taming or boosting of those frequencies on the front panel (as opposed to in software) would've been very welcome for gigging, but the difference between zero and ten is about the same as between five and five-three-eighths on a conventional amp.

I like the amp, but it's a missed opportunity IMO for global venue compensation on an amp which has multiple stored patches, without having to bring a Macbook.
Sorry, I wouldn't have known from your post just how in depth your amp knowledge was.

Then I guess the parameters controlled are just narrower on the Katana. My Blues Cubes seems to be similar so maybe it's simply the way BOSS/Roland designs it.
 

Finley13

Member
Messages
64
Sorry, I wouldn't have known from your post just how in depth your amp knowledge was.

Then I guess the parameters controlled are just narrower on the Katana. My Blues Cubes seems to be similar so maybe it's simply the way BOSS/Roland designs it.
Is that a Casino? How do you like it?
 

MrTAteMyBalls

Member
Messages
3,913
got my katana 100 1x12 today. it's a pretty cool piece of kit. especially for 250 used. updated firmware and got to know tone studio and the sneaky amps.

first impressions. BR twin clean is loads better than the stock clean. this plus the internal blues driver sounds great. also feels really tubey, which surprised me.

I like the matchless and the 1959. those may get used but otherwise I actually really like the lead and brown channels stock models. I can probably play 90 percent of what I do on the brown setting plus TS boost for leads.

internal effects are hit or miss. blues driver and TS both sound great. delays all sound nice, but no dotted eight. reverb and mods are boring, but functional enough for basic sounds. pitch shifting and harmonizer sound fine in monophonic, but chords sound bad as always with boss. they can't touch ehx here. although a single pog2 cost as much as this whole amp, so not surprised there.

I think this amp plus the ga-fC, a tuner, and zoom ms-70 will do everything I need for playing live. and it's light as a feather to boot.

that said. I will likely change the speaker. there is something going on above 5k that is hard to dial out. I think something that rolls off quicker like an eminence v12 would make it sound even better at relatively low cost. I mean, it sounds good already and i could live with it, but not tweaking something on my amp is just not possible for me. =). any suggestions from those who have swapped the speaker? I have a V30 but I think that would make it worse.
 

soulman969

Member
Messages
3,652
Is that a Casino? How do you like it?
Yes, it is. I've only had it for about 3 1/2 months but I love it. It's a great guitar. Traded my Lucille for it locally with a guy whose a Beatle fanatic. He had two and was glad to trade one for something different.

I've always wanted a hollow body and humbuckers and I don't get along all that well so a Casino seemed like fair solution. This is the fourth current Epiphone I've owned and the value they offer is outstanding.
 

Ramboorider

Supporting Member
Messages
869
Unable to get my Katana 50 updated or the drivers installed properly! I have downloaded them too many times. I'm about ready to throw the amp in a dumpster!
I just got a 50 a couple weeks ago and I can assure you it's not the amp - I got it updated with both the midi driver and firmware within just a few minutes. I was thinking it might be something with your computer, but as long as you can hook up the amp to the computer and see the amp as a drive, it's just a matter of dragging the right folders over, so it really shouldn't be that. If you're able to see the amp and drag files/folders to it, I'd just try it again after reading the directions really carefully. If you can't get the amp to show up as a drive on your computer, something else is going on...

Good luck,

-Ray
 

Michel347

Member
Messages
412
got my katana 100 1x12 today. it's a pretty cool piece of kit. especially for 250 used. updated firmware and got to know tone studio and the sneaky amps.

first impressions. BR twin clean is loads better than the stock clean. this plus the internal blues driver sounds great. also feels really tubey, which surprised me.

I like the matchless and the 1959. those may get used but otherwise I actually really like the lead and brown channels stock models. I can probably play 90 percent of what I do on the brown setting plus TS boost for leads.

internal effects are hit or miss. blues driver and TS both sound great. delays all sound nice, but no dotted eight. reverb and mods are boring, but functional enough for basic sounds. pitch shifting and harmonizer sound fine in monophonic, but chords sound bad as always with boss. they can't touch ehx here. although a single pog2 cost as much as this whole amp, so not surprised there.

I think this amp plus the ga-fC, a tuner, and zoom ms-70 will do everything I need for playing live. and it's light as a feather to boot.

that said. I will likely change the speaker. there is something going on above 5k that is hard to dial out. I think something that rolls off quicker like an eminence v12 would make it sound even better at relatively low cost. I mean, it sounds good already and i could live with it, but not tweaking something on my amp is just not possible for me. =). any suggestions from those who have swapped the speaker? I have a V30 but I think that would make it worse.
Since you mentionned (there is something going on above 5k that is hard to dial out), I would say, don't spend any money and use the channel or global EQ, also try to break-in that EOM speaker, it worths it, or if money is no object and you really want to mod it, I changed mine for a Celestion V-Type in my KTN50, this speaker smooths out what is happening in that 5K range, I got great result.
 

BenoA

Member
Messages
1,760
ive had my katana for a while and love it but not sure i'm getting the best out of it, so thought id come here to see what you guys think.

What is the consensus on how to get the best clean pedal platform tone?
i want a nice warm , responsive, ever so slightly overdriven clean tone.
do you set the gain and crank the master, then set the volume with the channel volume?
or set the gain, crank the channel volume, and set the master ?
Try this, I got those settings from someone on the Facebook group. Sounds pretty good to my ears:


And if your guitar has low output pickups, just add a lil' bit of clean boost as this. YMMV and in my case with my Sterling Cutlass, I had to set the level of the clean boost a bit higher. Final touch, some spring reverb to your taste and it sounds quite good with the Boss speakers.


Let me know if you don't see the images.
 

Caaarrl94

Member
Messages
161
Try this, I got those settings from someone on the Facebook group. Sounds pretty good to my ears:


And if your guitar has low output pickups, just add a lil' bit of clean boost as this. YMMV and in my case with my Sterling Cutlass, I had to set the level of the clean boost a bit higher. Final touch, some spring reverb to your taste and it sounds quite good with the Boss speakers.


Let me know if you don't see the images.
are you cranking the master volume as others have agreed with, and setting the level with the channel volume?
 

BenoA

Member
Messages
1,760
are you cranking the master volume as others have agreed with, and setting the level with the channel volume?
You know what... Good question that I just replied on the Facebook group: "I use it the other way around and very happy with my sound. 3 easy words: Use Your Ears!".
 

MrTAteMyBalls

Member
Messages
3,913
Since you mentionned (there is something going on above 5k that is hard to dial out), I would say, don't spend any money and use the channel or global EQ, also try to break-in that EOM speaker, it worths it, or if money is no object and you really want to mod it, I changed mine for a Celestion V-Type in my KTN50, this speaker smooths out what is happening in that 5K range, I got great result.

Hey thanks! I will at least play it at a few practices with the band first. I played a bit more this afternoon. tubes or no tubes, this thing sounds very good.
 

Caaarrl94

Member
Messages
161
You know what... Good question that I just replied on the Facebook group: "I use it the other way around and very happy with my sound. 3 easy words: Use Your Ears!".
haha, im extremely happy with the sound i was getting already, was just curious what everyone else was doing to get theirs
 




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