Brian May proves that small amps kick ass!

seiko

Member
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3,967
:agree

AC30s = LOUD
Seriously, one of the rehearsal spaces I had used to use had an amazingly loud Korg-era AC30, would hang with the JCM800 stack in the place and ate the JC120 alive. I was already well aware that wattage ratings are largely meaningless but this was a really loud and graphic reminder
 

kingsleyd

Frikkin genyus
Gold Supporting Member
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8,016
I own a '62 AC-30 which I play daily. It sits next to a Marshall half-stack ('72 50W bass head & cab) and is every bit as big and loud in its presentation as the Marshall rig. Well... that particular Marshall is a beast... so maybe not quite as big. But equally in need of attenuation if I wanted to run it on "6" or above anywhere I'll ever play besides my own studio.

The AC-30 is an absolute joy to play, fwiw. Definitely my all-time favorite. Not that I'm an "all-time favorite" kinda guy. :messedup
 

fierce_carrot

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1,880
It's amazing nobody else has mentioned this.

Are we really hearing the enormous sound of "one" guitar from Brian May?

The guy in the back line chugging away on the Les Paul may have a different view. (LOL!)

The 2nd guitarist is there, but there is absolutely no doubt that Brian's guitar is the main guitar people hear. I listened very closely and you can hear each and every power chord Brian plays is easily discernable.
 

Catoogie

Senior Member
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3,969
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]"[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] It's called the "Deacy" in honor of its creator, John Deacon, Queen's bassist, and it's an unlikely combination of a piecemeal amp, built of parts salvaged from a refuse heap in the early 1970's, and May's handcrafted "Treble Booster" pedal. Along with his guitar, this constituted an entirely original, homemade system, with a surprisingly pleasing and unmistakable sound quality.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] May's one-of-a-kind combo amp started with a simple amplifier circuit board that consisted of an obsolete solid-state design, and was almost certainly lifted from a discarded car radio. The board was installed into a compact, 1960's "bookshelf" HiFi speaker cabinet, fitted with a small woofer and tweeter. There were no controls to speak of, and the invention was powered by a 9 Volt battery, yielding an output of 0.45 Watts RMS. When teamed with May's Treble Boost pedal (which accentuates the upper-mid frequencies) and Red Special guitar, the resulting sound was both unnervingly beautiful and historically monumental."[/FONT]​
 

illini

Member
Messages
2,325
Thanks for the clip. Although I agree with others that the AC30 isn't the first to come to mind when I think of a small amp.
 

colin617

Senior Member
Messages
875
While I do love a good Queen tune (and I love the tone May gets on the intro to Fat Bottomed Girls), I don't consider an AC30 a "small" amp.

Now Ryan Adams' Princetons -- those are awesome sounding.
 

Unabender

Member
Messages
684
The 2nd guitarist is there, but there is absolutely no doubt that Brian's guitar is the main guitar people hear. I listened very closely and you can hear each and every power chord Brian plays is easily discernable.
You can hear the 2nd guitarist's playing clearly as May does solo at around 3 minutes into the video.

They are using an age old trick: The 2nd guitarist basically plays what the 1st guitarist plays with a similar sound, making it sound like a single huge guitar.
 

suparsonic

Member
Messages
2,714
Off topic slightly, that vid goes to show just how good queen are, even without Freddy. Stellar job by PR. Huge guitar sound as usual, as mentioned, mostly double tracked though.
 




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