Briggs Classic vs. Grosh Set-neck

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by Lerxst2112, Mar 7, 2006.


  1. Lerxst2112

    Lerxst2112 Member

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    Looking for the ultimate Les Paul-style guitar. Anyone have any comments on either? A guy I know (a vintage nut with a collection of '60s ES series and a '58 Les Paul) says the Grosh Set-neck is the best guitar he's played. Any opinions? How alike are they? Anything anyone can tell me...
     
  2. DWB1960

    DWB1960 Senior Member

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    McNaught Vintage Single Cut. I picked this one up a couple months back and it still amazes me to this day.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. AaeCee

    AaeCee Member

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    What a beauty! Agree on the McNaughts...they're very special guitars.
     
  4. FredW

    FredW Member

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    I have a Briggs Classic on order and the youngest piece of wood on the guitar is 30 years old. It has a 75 year old mahogany neck ,30 yr old body, 45 yr old maple top and a 50 yr old Brazilian rosewood fret board. The reason I was so crazy about his guitars at NAMM was the use of old growth wood and the tone was unbelievable.
     
  5. DWB1960

    DWB1960 Senior Member

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    I have a Briggs double cut Avatar on order that should be completed in about 2 months and also a Thorn double cut that won't be completed until early next year. I can't speak for either of their single cut designs but it's hard to imagine a better LP than the McNaught. Stunning workmanship, very ergonomic, and tones like the best Les Pauls you've ever heard. Really something special.
     
  6. 1radicalron

    1radicalron Member

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    The Brigg's Guitars are Very Nice. Don Grosh Also Builds Really Great Guitars.
    My Advice = Play many, and Choose the One that you Bond with the Most.
    Also Check out: McInturff, Gene Baker, Roukangas....
    [​IMG]
     
  7. suhr_rodney

    suhr_rodney Supporting Member

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    I was fortunate enough to play the prototype Briggs Classic. It was incredible. One day I was at Indoor Storm when Jack came in with his prototype 'Classic' guitar. Not only is the guitar one of the finest set neck guitars I've ever played, but Jack is a super cool guy. He is down to earth and humble. One day I'll own one (or more) of his guitars. Unfortunately, today is not that day.
     
  8. 6thstringmusic

    6thstringmusic Member

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    I've had the privilege of playing every guitar mentioned so far (including Ruokangas) and do agree with everyone that they are all excellent instruments (Also check: Stevens Guitars, Giffin guitars, Abyss Guitars, Myka Guitars, and New Orleans Guitars). As you must already know, a guitar is extremely personal and the only way to find the "best LP style" guitar would be to try everything out and choose for yourself. Now, coming from a building perspective, I know that there has yet to be a current production guitar that competes with the standards set by Johan Gustavsson and his Bluesmaster. If you were interested in his guitars however, there's definitely a bit of a wait and will surely take some pounds off your wallet. If you know exactly what you're looking for in this guitar, get in contact with some respected luthiers who will custom build to your specs - always a great way to insure your satisfaction. There are so many incredibly talented luthiers today, choices just seem to grow more and more difficult! If you are stuck between just those two guitars (Briggs and Grosh), I would get the Briggs as it's value will be much higher in the future.
     
  9. Lerxst2112

    Lerxst2112 Member

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    Trying before you buy is definitely the best thing to do. However, there are a ton of problems with trying before I buy. The simplest way to put this is that I live in an area where there are NO dealers that deal in really high-end guitars/amps (Charleston, South Carolina). It's an 8 hour drive to Fat Sound/Indoor Storm, and that's not really very appealing. Not only that, but it seems they get these things in on an order-by-order basis... the ones that aren't ordered by customers are snagged immediately. In other words, the odds of actually getting to try one are not great, and I'm not too sure that it's worth the expenditure of effort. The nice thing is with really high-end instruments like the Grosh, Suhr, Briggs and McNaught, you can't really go wrong... they're so high-quality that the only reason to choose one over another is going to be liking one or two features above the rest.

    My Suhr = never played a Suhr in my life. Ordered one blind.
    Bruno = same.
    Aiken = same.

    I'm ecstatic with all of 'em. Obviously it IS better to try before you buy, but sometimes it's not really a viable option and you have to go on what you hear and know of the instrument.

    I'm just looking for the ultimate blues-rock/slide guitar (for my very limited slide skill :AOK).
     
  10. Long2Play

    Long2Play Member

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    I have not played the Briggs. I own a Grosh Set Neck. It is the most tonally balanced and harmonically complex instrument of this type, I have ever played. I have played most of the other instruments listed here including the best of the "Holy Grail" vintage examples. It is wonderful that there are so many great choices.

    Don is a wonderful guy and a great builder. I do not believe instruments of this type can get much better than his. He really put his heart and soul into creating his vision of the ultimate LP type guitar. It balances really well on a strap. The neck access is wonderful and his fretwork is stellar.

    The Briggs is going to have to be un freakin believable to beat the Grosh, IMO.

    :)
     
  11. Long2Play

    Long2Play Member

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    That statement is pure opinion and conjecture. There is nothing to base it on other than that.

    Pick the guitar that makes you happy, inspired and satisfied....

    And keep it!!
     
  12. Lerxst2112

    Lerxst2112 Member

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    Like I said, I don't know if I'll be able to try any of them. I really love the looks of both, and the Briggs does have that SlimFat switch, which looks really cool...

    As I mentioned earlier, I'm not going to get a bad guitar no matter which one I ended up ordering (and this is for the distant future, by the way). It's all about which I'd prefer...
     
  13. Shane S

    Shane S Member

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    I have a Don Grosh Set Neck on order. You should also consider that the construction of the two guitars is quite different: The Grosh is a single cut while the Briggs is a Double Cut. This will make a difference in the tone of the two instruments. Kind of like a Les Paul vs. PRS McCarty - both guitars are similar in tone but different at the sametime.
     
  14. 6thstringmusic

    6thstringmusic Member

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    Originally Posted by 6thstringmusic
    If you are stuck between just those two guitars (Briggs and Grosh), I would get the Briggs as it's value will be much higher in the future.


    Originally Posted by Long2Play
    That statement is pure opinion and conjecture. There is nothing to base it on other than that.



    Unfortunately Grosh guitars (along with many others) lose a good amount on resale (You are still definitely getting your moneys worth). I am not saying this because Briggs are superior etc (as it is personal), but that is just a fact. The set-neck is certainly going to be a more desirable guitar (in comparison to the bolt-ons) which will help in that case, however, a guitar by Jack Briggs is just harder to come by (and as more people discover his guitars, the interest will jump even higher. Simply put, there are more Grosh guitars around than there are Briggs (and it seems there always will be). I am not trying to get anyone upset here or start any debate (although I may be a new member of this site, I am not a new member to the market), but guitars (which are of course incredibly well built) that are more rare, naturally demand a higher resale. Is this a conjecture? Most certainly- but backed by logical reasoning.
     
  15. Lerxst2112

    Lerxst2112 Member

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    Yes, you definitely have a point. A valid argument that has true premises has a true conclusion. I think I'll go with the Grosh, but that's certainly liable to change. It doesn't matter - my ordering is a long, long way away! At least a year, I'd guess.

    Either way, I'm sure the Briggs and the McNaught are incredible guitars.
     
  16. r9player

    r9player Silver Supporting Member

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    Big fan of J Nunis and the GMP Pawnshop Deluxe here.
     
  17. enharmonic

    enharmonic Old Growth Gold Supporting Member

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    While I understand your opinion, I must respectfully disagree. All things being constant, you have to have the demand for the instrument before you ask for the higher resale. I had two hand made Keith Roscoe LP-style guitars that were as nice as any guitars I have ever played...ever. They were easily worth what I paide for them. In fact, i have paid more for instruments of inferior quality and workmanship.

    I took a bath on them when I sold them because there was no demand. Should I have been able to get well over 2k each? Using your logic of rarity, absolutely. Using the reality of a very tight market for high end guitars with a lot of LP-inspired substitutes, not at all.

    Briggs makes a monster guitar, and no doubt there are a lot of people interested in owning one, but I don't know that he has enough instruments on the second hand market to bear out your assertion. I'm happy to stand corrected, because I'd like to see guys like Briggs, Grosh, and McInturff enjoy the resale on their instruments that the quality should demand. Reality is that it just hasn't happened for Grosh and McInturff, and the jury is out on Briggs.

    Beautiful guitars...the few people I know who have played them rave over them...just like the Grosh's and TCM's. Demand for any of them will drive resale...not how few or how many there are in the market. If he only did 10 a year and nobody wanted them, what would they be worth? If he did 500 a year and there was a 3 year wait list, what would they be worth? A lot more than the 10 a year with no demand :)

    The rationale of the buyer is that their high-end guitar should be worth what they pay for it when they resell. Sometimes it is. Often times, you take a hit. Occasionally, it's worth considerably more.

    :JAM
     
  18. abergdahl

    abergdahl Member

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    Johan Gustavsson makes a truly wonderful single cut LP style guitar. If it's a burst sound and classic look you want Gustavsson is the obviuos choice. That beeing said i LOVE my Roukangas and would i think it compares very well from a tone, feel and quality perspective but the Gustavsson Bluesmaster IS more LP flavored.
    And i would LOVE te see what Bill chapin would come up with if you ask him for a LP sound.:eek:
     
  19. 6thstringmusic

    6thstringmusic Member

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    Hello Again- I do completely agree with your statement, not a bit of false information etc. Now it just falls to opinion (which we are all entitled to of course) whether Briggs guitars will be that in demand. I believe that after this past NAMM show, the one thing that was truly extraordinary was Jack Briggs' instruments. Many, many people there also agree. I'm just saying that I would bet a lot of money on Briggs Guitars being extremely popular in the very near future (especiallly with Guthrie signing on now as well). If money and time were not an issue, Gustavsson would be my #1, then Briggs.
     
  20. Mr.Hanky

    Mr.Hanky Supporting Member

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    Blah Blah Blah....

    BUY A LES PAUL!!!
     

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