Broke trem arm in bridge

RLD

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,670
A buddy of mine gave me his Squire Strat to set up.
It was way out of whack but has potential.
I installed the trem arm to get a bit of float.
It went in fine and worked for a few bends.
When I went to remove it, it got a little tight and snapped off leaving half of the threaded end still in the block.
I'm wondering if its even worth the trouble trying to remove the broken piece or instead just upgrade the trem for $30.
Anybody have any luck doing this with an easy-out or left hand drill bit?
 

Lewguitar

Senior Member
Messages
5,663
Your old block is probably just pot metal.

I'd just toss it and get a new steel block and new arm from Callaham.

The Callaham's sound so good and made to higher tolerances.

And it's so nice to have a tremolo arm that doesn't wobble around in the threaded socket.

Get a Callaham. I'm glad I did.

Call him and have your old vibrato and a ruler or measuring tape there by the phone so you can measure string spacing, screw spacing and what not so you can get exactly the right replacement.
 

Gitarman

Member
Messages
1,908
To answer your question: Yes, I have removed one, easily (no pun intended), with an EZ-out in the past.

Since it's a Squier, and likely made of cheap pot metal (like Lewguitar said above), I'd probably spring for one of the GuitarFetish replacements made from brass or steel... maybe even upgrade it to a Wilky.
 

poolshark

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,305
For minimal investment, try taking it out with a screw extractor - I've done it a few times and always got the job done. If you insist on spending money, I'd go with a GFS replacement block or trem unit - in my experience, both are surprisingly adequate/nice, and a definite upgrade from non-MIJ Squier parts. No way I'd put Callaham money into a Squier.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
36,559
For minimal investment, try taking it out with a screw extractor - I've done it a few times and always got the job done. If you insist on spending money, I'd go with a GFS replacement block or trem unit - in my experience, both are surprisingly adequate/nice, and a definite upgrade from non-MIJ Squier parts. No way I'd put Callaham money into a Squier.
+1
The GFS arm wiggles, too. So does Fender.
Use plumber's tape.
 

Gevalt

Member
Messages
2,303
GFS brass block is a fabulous value, and I loved mine. I still kind of miss it after upgrading to KGC a year after. Fat tones, and instant joy over the Zinc.

I tried to "easy-out" my broken arm from the GFS, but brass and steel bind, plus I used a Fender tremelo-tension spring, so that piece went nowhere. Maybe I could've gotten it if I were handier with the easy-outs. Use a drill-press for something exact-to-centre-I did not.
 

monty

Member
Messages
25,028
Careful when ordering a block, some Squier strats are too shallow to take one.
 

RLD

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,670
Thanks everyone. I'm looking for a replacement tremolo.
Careful when ordering a block, some Squier strats are too shallow to take one.
You're right.
I've got a MIM Strat replacement trem from Guitarfetish for a upcoming project and it doesn't fit the Squire.
Squire route is too narrow and the body is thinner so the full block would stick out the back.
This is becoming more difficult than I anticipated.
Anyone know a direct replacement that fits a Squire made in China?
I've got an email to Guitarfetish asking the same.
Might have to back out that broken piece after all.
 

Kyle B

Member
Messages
5,290
Here's a non-invasive suggestion.....

Remove the tremelo, stick it in the freezer for a couple hours. Different metals expand at different rates. Steel expands much less than zinc (likely candidate for the material your block is made of). The hole will get bigger than then rod, and may become very easy to get out.

If that doesn't work, you could also try the opposite --- Heat it up in the oven.

Maybe even alternate between the two. Lots of fasteners come loose all by themselves due to thermal cycling.
 




Trending Topics

Top Bottom