Buffers: How Many?

Animule

Member
Messages
135
I plugged straight into my amp last night and noticed a lot more sparkle than usual. I have a feeling all the cable I'm using is to blame. I've got effects in front of the amp and effects in the loop. That's a heck of a lot of cable!

So, if I was to purchase something like a This1ismine buffer, would I just need one in front of the amp (guitar > buffer > misc effects > amp)? Or would I need two? One in front of the amp and one in the loop (send > buffer > effects > return)?

Thanks!
 

kwood86

Member
Messages
412
from my understanding just one after your guitar before your effects should do the trick
another thing you could try is buying a couple DI boxes
one for your board
one for your amp
and basically convert your line to a balanced line (use an XLR cable)
and convert it back to 1/4 TS at your amp

Iv run this set up for years when playing in larger venues and my amp was mic'ed off stage in an isolation cabinet
 

stinkfoot

Member
Messages
6,128
Cable length does matter, but mostly between the guitar and the first active stage. So the length of cable you used when going straight to the amp is the length you want between the guitar and the buffer. From there, you can go into the pedals and to the amp without worrying too much about the length of cable. Some effects may prefer to "see" the guitar signal directly (mostly fuzz pedals, but also some overdrives can be this way) - if you notice one of the pedals sounding less than ideal with a buffer in front of it, simply move it in front of the buffer.

The loop send is already low impedance, so it won't suffer from long cables the same way as the guitar->pedalboard cable does. Usually, there's no need for a buffer there.
 

freaksho

Member
Messages
3,999
Cable length does matter, but mostly between the guitar and the first active stage. So the length of cable you used when going straight to the amp is the length you want between the guitar and the buffer. From there, you can go into the pedals and to the amp without worrying too much about the length of cable. Some effects may prefer to "see" the guitar signal directly (mostly fuzz pedals, but also some overdrives can be this way) - if you notice one of the pedals sounding less than ideal with a buffer in front of it, simply move it in front of the buffer.

The loop send is already low impedance, so it won't suffer from long cables the same way as the guitar->pedalboard cable does. Usually, there's no need for a buffer there.
this sums up my understanding too.

the only thing i'll add is that you might want to make sure none of the pedals in front of your amp are already buffered bypass (iow they are all True Bypass). if there is already a buffered pedal out front then you may not notice a difference by adding dedicated buffer. the sparkle loss may be coming from the FX loop. for example my loop is buffered but it still loads down the signal and takes away volume & some tone too.
 
Messages
17,695
I have a few buffered pedals...I also have a few pedals throughout the chain that are always on (thus a buffered signal)

I have a ton of pedals in my chain...and the best thing Ive ever done to get back to the "guitar straight to amp" tone/dynamics is to get the pedals out of the chain...not by removing them, but by putting them in a true bypass switcher (thisismyne also sells these)...so when you arent using a pedal it is no longer in the chain, and more importantly the cables are no longer in the chain...

best thing I ever did for my tone
 

LuckyBlackCat

Member
Messages
708
I mean this in all seriousness...first try just adjusting the treble control on your amp to see if you can compensate.

I have a T1M buffer that I used for a while, then I needed the space so I took it off. Yes, I lost a little high end, but I was able to fix that just adjusting my amp.
 

chops612

Member
Messages
627
A lot of people get really confused with what they consider treble and highs. Not speaking for all amps, but a majority's treble knob actually control upper mids. The high end of the guitar frequency spectrum is the sparkle and shimmer vs the upper mids can be the ice pick that a lot of people refer to. A buffer in general will absolutely help in regaining that sparkle that is lost due to cable capacitance. Unfortunately sometime you get too much and can interfere with other effects. I would suggest trying a buffer and "hearing" for yourself.
 

Jahn

Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
28,804
i use one, that's all i need.
 

eclipseall

Member
Messages
1,484
I just placed a CMATMOD Mini Buffer first in my chain.
Kicks the signal through the board like there was no board.
Nice buffer. Highly recommended.
 




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