Builders: post a pic of your groundbreaking (for you) work and tell us the story!

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by Terry McInturff, Oct 3, 2008.

  1. Terry McInturff

    Terry McInturff 40th Anniversary of guitar building! Gold Supporting Member

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    Hello all,

    I thought that it would be great for all of us builders to have a chance to show us, and to tell us all about, any guitars that we all have made that we felt "broke new ground"...new designs that solved old challenges...or a piece of work that the builder feels has fundamentally steered the guitar into new waters...or even, a feature that you personally pioneered that may just represent a notable advance as regards the guitar...

    This thread is intended to give the builders a chance to show what they feel have been pivotal personal works, and to explain why they feel that their given examples are pivotal works. :)

    At the extreme risk of sounding highfallutin (did I spell that correctly?) I ask that we all give examples that are beyond cosmetic appointments, are beyond "the first time that I did a great fret job", and the like.

    1) Do show groundbreaking work of your's that you feel is advancing the guitar as an instrument...and feel free to explain why such is advancing the guitar. Be wordy if you wish...tell us all about it! This is guitar history in-the-making, and as such should be documented!

    2) Do show groundbreaking guitars...designs of your's...that helped to solve mysteries that you had chosen to explore, and to master. Write at whatever length that you care to, in order to help us to understand your thinking.

    Certainly, the group of builders that comprise the family of TGP "builders" are incredibly talented, and indeed (IMO) are the "Cream-Of-The-Crop". :)

    It is the intent of this thread to "show-off" a bit of the innovation.. let me make that clear...innovation.... that our best builders have.

    I am certain that our very best will educate us, enlighten us, and help us to appreciate their groundbreaking experience, talent, and vision. If there has indeed been advances in the design of the electric guitar, chances are very good that we can see some portion of these right here in this thread.

    Builders, take it away.
     
  2. drezdin

    drezdin Member

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    Great idea for a thread.

    How about kicking it off with your own stories?

    Maybe we could get Ron Thorn in to talk about that new carbon fiber guitar
     
  3. Quinny

    Quinny Member

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    Good idea. I'd love to see something from Ulrich Teuffel, is he a member here? Dave Myka too. :)
     
  4. JeffreyET

    JeffreyET Member

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    This is the Biased Action Tremolo bridge I developed in 1991. It uses geometry to even out vibrato response across the strings. The springs in back are angled to balance, across the fulcrum, the saddle base which is angled both down and foreward on the treble side. The photos show 2 out of 3 total prototypes, & it works so well I still regularly wang off with the original.

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    Last edited: Oct 3, 2008
  5. JeffreyET

    JeffreyET Member

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    [​IMG]

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    I conceived & built 2 instruments with split-level fingerboards in about 1996. I filed a provisional patent for this.
    One is a 25-inch scale stereo tuned E, A, D (bass strings, actually B, E, A guage strings) and doubled G, B, E. It feels just like a low action 12- string, because the split fingerboard compensates for the vast difference in string guage.
    The other is is an 8 string bass tuned B, E, A, D with four fingerboard levels.
    I still have both of these.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2008
  6. JeffreyET

    JeffreyET Member

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    [​IMG]
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    The JET Earlewoods & Calderas feature a peaked top joint, which both reduces weight and increases resonant complexity, as well as a 24th endfret which keeps the neck pickup in the same position as on a 22 fret guitar.
    I developed these in 1998 and they have been pretty successful.
    Thank you terry, for starting this thread.
     
  7. JeffreyET

    JeffreyET Member

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  8. uncleshish

    uncleshish Member

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    I can't really say I have made any new innovations unto the world of guitar building but I do strive each and every time to perfect my craft.
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    After 20 years at my job at the newspaper, I am within about a month of being phased out. The only other thing I know is guitar building and repair .... is it enough to stay afloat in small-town America???
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    I studied under a master-luthier who unselfishly shared his knowledge and spared me many a mistake along the way. Now I'm on my own and often find myself thinking "oh, that's what he was talking about" as I try and figure out a way to fix my latest fubar. One of his famous quotes that have stuck with me: "Only failure questions the method"
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    Thanks for looking.
     
  9. jaycee

    jaycee Member

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    I like yours much better. :AOK
     
  10. stan p

    stan p Member

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    Awesome! Kind of along the lines of Novax?
     
  11. Terry McInturff

    Terry McInturff 40th Anniversary of guitar building! Gold Supporting Member

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    This was the first f-hole semi-hollow that "cracked the code" for me as regards voicing the chambers to the exact resonant frequency required to eliminate "live" and "dead" spots on the fretboard.

    I had pioneered this method a few years earlier via my Royal model...but the introduction of f-holes required a re-think and finessing of my methodology.

    [​IMG]


    All in all, randomly placed hollow spots inside a guitar do not yield the ultra even fretboard responce that I seek to achieve. Here's the second guitar with the newer version voicing:

    [​IMG]


    One of my top contributions has been my proprietary neck design. I developed it in 1981. It features the first successful method for defeating the bowing near the body that is caused by accumulation of stress in a guitar neck....but it is the complete build schedule that has yielded over 3000 TCM necks with zero warrantee returns.
     
  12. JeffreyET

    JeffreyET Member

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    I remember talking with you about that Terry, when you had your early pieces displayed in your space in the same building as Harry's Guitar Shop. You said you used shorter carbon graphite rods specifically to reinforce the upper register & keep it flat.
     
  13. LTE

    LTE Member

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    Jeff,

    Nobody likes a showoff.

    :moon

    Just kidding. Great work and interesting ideas. Hope to get my hands on one of your axes these days.

    Say Jeff,

    Did you pick up the latest Dream Theater record?
     

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