Building a house... home studio requirements?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by Jerrod, Aug 6, 2006.

  1. Jerrod

    Jerrod Silver Supporting Member

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    I'm building a new house, and have plenty of room for music gear and a home studio. I have no professional aspirations, I just want a place to dink around w/ my PC-DAW and get good results with minimal disruption to my wife. How would you set it up? I have Demeter boxes, 2x12s, 4x12s, and combos. What would YOU do for micing speakers? How would you isolate them? What electrical requirements should I use to minimize ground loops, hum, etc? Anything else you can think of that I should be aware of? Thanks.

    Jerrod
     
  2. John Czajkowski

    John Czajkowski Member

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    Here is a fantastic resource for you: John Sayers

    I actually was in the same position a few years back and John helped me get my control room, drum and extra room dimensions together. He really knows his applied acoustics. Having studied lots of math and engineering in college, I felt tempted to go it alone, but I'm glad I didn't. John has a very good pentagonal room shape for control rooms/listening rooms, etc (if you really want a great-sounding room). All the stuff about floating floors and double isolating walls may be overkill for your needs, but his site has it all. I think you have to buy his book now. I'd just grab it if I were you. It used to be online in a draft form.

    In general, please never forget that you should consider resale value of your home, so I would suggest trying to integrate the design as much as possible into the overall flow of the home as much as possible so that if you ever sell your place, the control room is in a good location for a multimedia palace and any drum/other rooms are in a suitable location for a bedroom/office or what have you. It will complicate things at first, but in the end, it may help make the overall aesthetic feel right once your back and wallet are recovering with a nice cold toddy!

    The more flexible you keep your cabling plan, the better. If you are like me, you'll want to keep changing stuff, so the last thing you'll want to do is to have to cut open walls to modify an overly specific original configuration.

    You didn't really say what your overall scope of design is, but as far as overall room dimension go, you are in the ultimately flexible position of being able to make things as large as practically possible. If you haven't been in tons of working studios, it is really nice to have lots of crawl space behind gear, room for musicians to come rolling through with big racks, drum cases, etc. This space is easy to neglect on paper.

    Good luck with your research!
     
  3. UnderTheGroove

    UnderTheGroove Supporting Member

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  4. gixxerrock

    gixxerrock Member

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    My biggest piece of advice is to heavily soundproof. There are lots of good resources on the web about materials and construction techniques (offset studs, double windows, exterior doors, soundchannel ....) It is very nice to have the freedom to make music at 3am and not stress about sleeping wife/kids.

    Shawn.
     
  5. mdog114

    mdog114 Member

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    It's going to take a lot to get a room in your house sound-proofed to a point where you can crank your amp at 3AM.

    The net has plenty of info, but it's very difficult to get a house anywhere near pro-studio specs'. You might want to look into one small room adjacent to your control room and really sound-proof that. Floating floor/ceiling, good bass-traps, double sheetrocked, double-wall construction, etc!

    Even in many of the great studios, you get leakage to the outside. If you had a drummer, bassist and a guitarist wailing away, it's going to be heard throughout the house unless you really de-coupled the whole studio area from the rest of the home.

    If you've just going to playa around and not have any full session work, then it won't be a problem. If you want to jam/record a whole band and you're building a detached garage, it would likely be a better canidate.
     
  6. Jerrod

    Jerrod Silver Supporting Member

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    It's worth noting that this won't be a studio w/ a control room. This is just a place where I'll have guitars, amps, Demeter iso boxes, a PC, and some monitors set up. No drums, or at least no real drums... maybe a V-Drum setup. No band... just me. I want to sound-proof the room as well as I can so that I can mic cabinets in addition to using the Demeter boxes. Thanks for all the input guys!
     
  7. stratovarius

    stratovarius Supporting Member

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