Building DIY Sound Panels - Question

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by SPH77, Apr 16, 2015.

  1. SPH77

    SPH77 Member

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    I've built my Frames. I am going to cover the front with Burlap. I have Owens Corning 703.

    How much does it matter what I put on back? Lowes has a roll of contractor paper that is super cheap. Can I put that on the back?

    Thanks in advance.
    -Steve
     
  2. taez555

    taez555 Member

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    Is it going to be against a wall, or are you using them as standing Gobo's?

    It would seem to me, the paper would act as a reflective surface(even if just a little) if you have that facing your sound source. If it's against a wall though, probably doesn't matter if it's covered at all.
     
  3. SPH77

    SPH77 Member

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    Thanks for response. These will be mounted on wall. I just don't want fiberglass falling out of back :)
     
  4. elijah

    elijah Member

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    The contractors paper will work, a heavier material can be used also and could work as a membrane to help control lower frequencies, if you space the assembly off from the wall a little.
     
  5. Motterpaul

    Motterpaul Tone is in the Ears

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    I suggest something a little stronger than paper (even heavy paper). Something like pegboard/hardboard which is thinner & lighter than wood, but durable. -

    oh, mounted on the wall - just use a staple gun to mount the insulation.
     
  6. 335guy

    335guy Member

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    Perhaps some thin fabric stretched across the back and stapled to the frame would be a bit more secure and not as easy to tear and get ripped. BTW, what are you using on the fronts?
     
  7. SPH77

    SPH77 Member

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    I was thinking of burlap. But some people at the fabric store who did a home theater set up might have talked me out of it. Said it was ugly and smelled funny. So still deciding front.


     
  8. tenchijin2

    tenchijin2 Member

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    I use a muslin fabric or similar when I build mine. Looks very nice and works. I stretch it to cover the back side too, and staple it along the frame.
     
  9. Rhaudio

    Rhaudio Member

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  10. Old Black

    Old Black Member

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    As a smoother, cheaper, and easier to work with alternative, try landscape fabric. They usually come in brown, black, or green and you can buy them in many different size rolls at your local home store. They are very cheap, cut easily, do not fray, can be stapled to frames, are "porous" to sound (i.e. not very reflective), light, and look pretty good. I've used muslin, burlap, and landscape fabric and hands-down, landscape fabric is the best all-around stuff.
     
  11. retroLS1

    retroLS1 Supporting Member

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    Nice link, thank you. Might look into making some of these for my band's rehearsal space.
     
  12. treeofpain

    treeofpain Supporting Member

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    There is a lot of DIY stuff o the net about "bass traps". If you research this properly, you'll find that they don't really do much with bass frequencies at all, but they will help with highs and mids. If you truly have a problem with bass, then you'll find it takes a much more extensive and expensive room prep than just hanging a few insulated frames.
     
  13. tenchijin2

    tenchijin2 Member

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    The OP (and no one else as far as I can tell) didn't ask about "bass traps."

    That being said, putting sound panels of the right density and thickness in the right positions in rooms will help tremendously with the audible range of frequencies down into the low-mids and into the lows.

    But I'm pretty sure the OP just wants to know about fabric covering, not room treatment theory.
     
  14. Rex Anderson

    Rex Anderson Member

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    Using a frame makes it easier to fabric wrap and have nice square edges. You can then use the nice wood frame to attach your frame hanger/D hooks and just hang them on the wall with picture hangers.

    You can use Masonite for the backing.

    Also, 2" is not great, 4" is much better. Best and most linear is 6" (but few rooms can handle losing a foot -6" panels on both sides of the room). Use a 1" x 4" for the 4" thick panel frame.

    We paid an acoustician a lot of money to show us how to treat our rooms and make better panels.

    If you use 2" of 701 on top of 2" of 703, you get two different densities and thus more linear absorption. 701 goes on the room side, 703 on the wall side. Don't put any glue on the 701 or 703.

    701 is softer and fluffier and has a different frequency vs absorption curve than 703. For 6" panels (if your room can handle it), the bottom (or wall side layer) should be 2" of 705, a third density of material.

    I have installed a lot of these panels in a lot of different rooms (control rooms, recording studios, mastering rooms, home theaters etc) and they work great and are much better than just 2" 703 or even 4" of just 703.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2015
  15. RLD

    RLD Member

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    You've already built your frames but I'll share this link anyways.
    Very easy and inexpensive way to build panels.
    I made four 4"x24"x48" corner traps and one 2"x48"x48" ceiling cloud for under $200 and it made a tremendous difference in my small square studio room.
    I used low cost bed sheets from IKEA for fabric.
     
  16. fezz parka

    fezz parka Member

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    I build them out of old shutters mounted to a frame made of 1"x 4" pine. Rockwool or fiberglass insulation is tacked inside the mounted with an air gap behind it.

    [​IMG]

    They make for great corner traps too:
    [​IMG]
     

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