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Bummed. Defeated by a strat neck.

blong

Member
Messages
2,642
I replaced the stripped truss rod nut on a 1997 US strat. The guitar had a massive bow in the neck to begin with. Nut was stripped badly. I ordered a new one, removed the plug and old one, installed the new one, made sure it got the neck pretty straight, replaced the plug, installed strings, and the neck bowed pretty badly. I began tightening the nut and it would move and move, little movement on the neck. It got tight, and then the allen wrench started to slip, yet the bow is still there. I'm bummed/ I hate to tell the customer we can start over or he needs a new neck or a new guitar. He loves this strat, but I was afraid that the bow was bad enough not to get it out since the nut was already stripped. I reasoned it was stripped trying to get the bow out of the neck the first time. I tried to help the guy out, but I lost this battle.

I don't like not coming through on a repair. I just hate it. I guess I gotta accept it and move on, but I pride myself on trying to please my customers and have a great reputation for being a go-to guy and a stand-up guy, but this bugs me. Oh, well. Win some, lose some.

Any thoughts?

Bob
 

Soapbarstrat

Senior Member
Messages
2,060
I assume you pulled or clamped the neck into a back-bow while tightening the nut, to see if the tightened nut could at least hold it there.
 

John Coloccia

Cold Supporting Member
Messages
9,584
I had a strat neck like that a few months ago. I had to heat press it and use compression fretting to get it to finally come straight. It took SIGNIFICANT heat to finally get it to set. Melted the side dots right out of it :) It finally came, though. As you say, you win some, you loose some. Ultimately, we both know it's repairable if you really wanted too, but just how much money is someone willing to throw at a neck? You have to put food on the table so you can't just take the job on the cheap just for the challenge.
 

Sweetfinger

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
13,244
Ya got to know when to hold 'em, know when to fold 'em......

If a neck is that bad, I'm not going to bother with heat pressing or compression fretting. If the truss rod works and the bow isn't really horrific, I'll loosen the rod, plane the fingerboard flat, and refret, or tell the customer to simply replace the neck.
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
39,554
I don't like not coming through on a repair. I just hate it.
oh yeah, me too.

sage advice from the guys here, about picking your battles and discretion being the better part of valor, but a heat-clamping treatment might be worth a shot at least, and shouldn't suck up too much shop time.
 

blong

Member
Messages
2,642
I may try heat clamping. The guy doesn't want to spend too much or I'd do the planing of the board or compression fretting, but a refret is no in the books for him at this point. I tried everything with this one without heat press and refret/planing. It just bums me out b/c it seemed like an easy fix and he's a really nice guy referred to me by all the guys who play at his church. I see what I can do. And it's 2007, not a 1997. Anyway, thanks for helping me keep my chin up.

Bob
 
Messages
6,283
A new neck is probably the best way to go at this point. A 2007 strat neck should be a pretty easy find if he wanted to keep it semi-original. Saving a 1967 strat neck is a bit different than a 2007.
 

blong

Member
Messages
2,642
I'm working a few angles to see if we can get the neck replaced by Fender. If not, we'll seek other options. Thanks for the support.

Bob
 




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