Buying a hybrid car

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by redragon, Jul 6, 2018.

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  1. bluesdoc

    bluesdoc Gold Supporting Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Same here. Very nice car, though I never got more than 38 mpg. Then again, I don't go anywhere - just work and back. Since I got the Camry Hybrid, I put panels on my roof and have plenty of juice to charge a plug in. Next car after my Camry lease is up will be a plug in hybrid. Best of 3 worlds. Maybe :huh

    jon
     
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  2. Yam the BOMB

    Yam the BOMB Silver Supporting Member

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    I rode my 1st all electric motorcycle yesterday. It was very impressive on torque and acceleration.

    But they total range is about 100 miles. And a motorcycle that is nearly silent doesn’t seem safe the me.
     
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  3. Mark Robinson

    Mark Robinson Member

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    Do the arithmetic, it's basic. If you drive a lot, then hybrids and electrics make good sense. If you don't drive very much, the payback in fuel saved, to recover the additional expense of the tech can be really long. If you don't drive that much, but are motivated by the idea of using less gas, and don't care about the cash basis of the thing, that's also cool. Not everybody drives as cheaply as possible. Electric cars are really fun to drive. The relative silence and the ominous torque and accel are neat.

    In the world of electrics, the Chevy Bolt and Volt are appealing to me, cause you have the get out of jail free, option of using gas. For folks with a moderate commute, you can run gas free for the most part.

    Our family has a Prius and it's been exemplary, no problems of any kind and consistent mileage at about 48-52. We are also early adopters of the Nissan Leaf, which is a ton of fun to drive, but it's like driving a car that always has a quarter tank of gas. That's not for everybody. So when my daughter started a long school commute, we traded the leaf to my mother in law, for her old, low miles Lexus.

    When it's time, we'll replace the Prius with another electric. The new offerings solve the range anxiety and we only need one long haul car, my 4runner, and actually only a few times a year at that.
     
  4. standard24

    standard24 Member

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    I like the idea of a hybrid or all electric vehicle, but I buy my cars used and pay very little for them. I can afford to pay more for gas when I don't have a car payment and only carry liability insurance.

    Gasoline cars burn a ton of fuel starting from a dead stop. It would seem that a "modest" hybrid system could assist the car at takeoff and let the gas engine take over after 10-15 mph. I can even see how conventional cars could be retrofitted with a system like this.
     
  5. Headshok

    Headshok Member

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    Chevy Bolt can go 238 miles per charge and has a quick charge system that will bring it to 80-90% full charge in just an hour or two. I would own one because once the tax benefit is taken into account, they cost no more than a normal CUV.
     
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  6. Headshok

    Headshok Member

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    The Bolt is 100% electric
     
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  7. Headshok

    Headshok Member

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    Chevrolet has been an early proponent of the "Stop/Start" technology. Where the engine cuts out at red lights. It has been successful in the Silverado as well. They call it "E-Assist". It does not use a conventional starter to restart motor but rather a large battery with a huge serpentine belt that turns the motor over when stopped. No excessive starter wear and they have it down to where there are hardly any failures due to this system. They Silverado will also be available in 2019 with a 4 cylinder turbo making over 300 horsepower and able to do the work of a conventional V8. I look forward to what the future has in store.
     
  8. R3deemed

    R3deemed Member

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    I'm sure there was more to that than just the fact it was a hybrid.
    If true :omg
    I love the idea of a hybrid. I run my vehicles until there's nothing left to run, so the thought of replacing the expensive battery gives me pause. Having to replace it would obviously put a serious sent in whatever money was saved by mileage.
     
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  9. R3deemed

    R3deemed Member

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    I just rented an '18 Camry 4-cyl and got ~34MPG :huh
     
  10. sahhas

    sahhas Supporting Member

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    So the Apex show was from 2014, add 58 years, that puts the end of fossil fuels (or cost feasibility of getting it out of the ground, is what the Apex doc pointed out) around 2072.
    When I was in 8th grade science class back in 1978, my science teacher said that we have about 100 more years of fossil fuel left. Which I thought was an interesting thing to think of...I wasn't even driving yet! But that puts the end at around 2078.

    A friend of mine used to work for a big oil company, he left there in the late 90s, he said that the oil companies (at that time) were not looking to the future at all, couldn't see that their industry was probably ending in the coming decades....plus I think he had some fundamental disagreements with the industry....so he left...

    As pointed out in the old documentary "who killed the electric car", It's really not about being a "cheaper alternative to gas", it is more about we need to realize this model that we've been used to for 100 years will end, and something will have to replace it. It will still cost money to keep electric cars going, etc...

     
  11. Jisatsu

    Jisatsu Member

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    There are people who replace the batteries themselves for relatively cheap. I believe they recommend replacement at around 10 years or 200k miles, which ever is first. So it's not a common swap out. If you are looking at a gen 2 prius you might want to look into a battery change if it is still running the original set. But then again you can pick up a gen 2 prius for under $4k
     
  12. Mark Robinson

    Mark Robinson Member

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    Yes, I was confused, the Volt has the motor, thanks. The Bolt has great range, so I could use it for anything but an overnight multi state funeral run. I wish it was better looking, it’s a step back from the Volt imo in styling..
     
  13. tonyhay

    tonyhay Member

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    The World Proven Oil Reserves have never been higher. Buy a hybrid or electric car if you like them, but don’t do it based on oil running out anytime soon.

    In 1980 there were about 30 years of Proven Reserves. Yet here we are, nearly 40 years later, and there are about 50 years of Proven Reserves.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
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  14. mixn4him

    mixn4him Supporting Member

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  15. R3deemed

    R3deemed Member

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    I guess resale on hybrids isn't necessarily consistent with their traditional fuel equivalent. I never really thought about replacing the battery personally. The number I always hear bandied about is $3,500, but I don't really know how realistic that is.
     
  16. bluwoodsman

    bluwoodsman Member

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    Agree to this, would add some other reasons if we were allowed to discuss them here--but I don't think it's a good time to expect gas prices to decrease or even stay flat for some time.

    We've had Prius and Ford Fusion hybrids in the fleet at work. The latter ride much better, have more power, and don't do much worse in MPG. If I were in the market for a hybrid I would probably want to compare the few mpg difference between a spartan less comfortable hybrid and a larger one.

    There's some cause to look into maintenance costs--although the cost of batteries can be a bit oversold--but there are also many used non-prius hybrids on the market that often can be had much cheaper than their non-hybrid alternatives.

    If thinking of new however, I wouldn't dally too long. Tariffs are coming, and they look to add as much as 20% to any model made out of this country (whether HQ is in this country or not) and are expected to impact foreign parts as well (which affects just about everything made).
     
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  17. bluwoodsman

    bluwoodsman Member

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    Conservation and mileage standards have made a real difference....if only oil supply equated directly to current and near future gas prices--that's the issue in play here, not oil supplies running out some decades into the future.
     
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  18. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Rented a Ford Fusion hybrid on my latest visit to California. I was out in CA for about half a week. Besides driving around tow, I drove between San Diego and LA. I think I only filled the gas tank once.

    Whether to buy one or not might depend on what tax credits and other incentives are available in your state. I thought mine offered tax credit(s) at one time, but it seems to be gone now. The federal tax credit still appears to be there for 2018.
     
  19. xzacx

    xzacx Member

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    I'm not qualified to speculate on the future of hybrids, but I had them for about 10 years and couldn't have been happier. First I had a Prius, then a Lexus CT200h. I'm back to a standard motor now and to be honest, while it's a nicer vehicle, I sure miss the 40+ mpg I got so used to over the past decade.
     
  20. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    They think they know, but they don't really know.

    How did we make this transition from Peak Oil to massive oversupply once fracking finally took off.

    Although, these fracked wells sure flame out abruptly sometimes.

    The price of finished, consumer gas will go up despite what crude oil does, because taxes. Roads are in awful shape, and nothing gets them fixed like gasoline taxes.
     

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