California seems to be on fire all the time.

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Totally Bored, Dec 7, 2017.


  1. Fred Farkus

    Fred Farkus Member

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    Was talking to a friend who lives on the beach out there earlier today. All the sudden she says, “Gotta run. New fire in Malibu.” <shudder>
     
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  2. Matt Jones

    Matt Jones Supporting Member

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    Right in the center of the picture there is smoke from the newest 2000+ acre, out of control fire in North County San Diego. We packed our bug out bags last night.

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. slybird

    slybird Member

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    Someone posted this saying it was their morning commute.

     
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  4. bluwoodsman

    bluwoodsman Member

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    Some of that country is made to burn, NOT made for development. But...it is developed.
     
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  5. ghostrider

    ghostrider Supporting Member

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    I grew up in Ventura and Oxnard. I still have a few friends there and my buddy’s house burned down. He and his wife and kids are safe but they lost everything. :(
     
  6. hellbender

    hellbender Member

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    Fires are natural and little concern unless they impact human settlement. Earthquakes the same.
     
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  7. RoryGfan

    RoryGfan Silver Supporting Member

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    I have relatives in Manhattan, So Cal and Miami. Between them, there is always something going on somewhere. I agree with stevieboy on that, plus the national news coverage is going to reflect areas of large population and, often, higher income.

    In contrast, I live in the brush country of South Texas, between Corpus Christi and the Mexican border. Many people down here don't have heating in their homes, as it stays warm down here year around. Also, our population is low. My neighbor's ranch is 884,000 acres. That is larger than the state of Rhode Island. So, we do not even register on the news cycle.

    However, be that as it may, our weather forecast for tonight is for light snow. Some families will be huddled around one space heater.

    And, by the maps, there seems to be about 30 fires going in Alaska, but their situation probably will not be mentioned.

    But, the LA area, with population, income and commerce is important at several levels, and our hearts reach out to victims of all kinds of suffering, everywhere, whether or not it is on Page One. Why? Like hellbender says, natural disasters happen and we know that we could be next in line.
     
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  8. Joe Robinson

    Joe Robinson Member

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    Fires are incredibly VISUAL. The Media jumps all over them like flies on crap. So there is a lot over coverage of fairly rare events. As of tonight the loss of property is approx 250-300 structures? And I think, maybe 1, 2 fatalities. I don't mean to minimize the loss, I have co-workers who have lost everything. But the natural drama of a big wildfire on the fringes of megalopolis couldn't be more taylor made for exploitation from the media. It's disgusting to me when the field reporters start asking "What will you do now" to someone who is walking through the burned out remains of their home. I'm rambling.
     
  9. korby

    korby Supporting Member

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    If you live in California by the foothills it burns. 100 houses went up in an hour a street away from us when we lived in Porter Ranch. The earthquakes break up the monotony of the hills burning all the time.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
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  10. MrAstro

    MrAstro Member

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    I'm very surprised such severe fires are happening in your winter. Bushfires are far more common here in summer.
     
  11. Matt Jones

    Matt Jones Supporting Member

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    It's not winter yet. And this time of the year typically has very dry air and the potential of high winds.
     
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  12. Peteyvee

    Peteyvee Premium Platinum Member

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    She must have needed an excuse to get off the phone. 1/2 acre is a backyard in that hood...


    "A fire scorched about a half-acre of brush in Malibu Thursday, but no one was hurt.
    The fire was reported at 8:05 a.m. in the 5300 block of Horizon Drive, according to the county fire department. Chopper footage appeared to show a palm tree on fire, but officials were taking no chances with red flag conditions in place.
    About 200 firefighters were sent to the scene, along with a water-dropping aircraft.
    The fire was contained in about an hour, and some firefighters remained on scene dousing hot spots."

    That's the most ridiculous BS I've read here in a long time. Please stay far away from LA. We don't need any more loons from other places who spent a short time here spreading crazy tales about what it's like.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
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  13. MrAstro

    MrAstro Member

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    We declare summer 1 Dec. I notice the UK Met Office declares winter on 1 Dec. This is based on temperature cycles.

    Astronomical winter is normally after winter solstice granted.

    I should have expected the US would just have to be different.
     
  14. Matt Jones

    Matt Jones Supporting Member

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    Yeah we sure wouldn't want to base our seasons off temperature cycles.
     
  15. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    I worry a little about how the fires can develop regarding L.A.
    I mean, they are on the west COAST, and what are the plans or could it be that the fires spread enough that there is no escape, no evacuation possible (other than ships)?
    I'm a little amazed folk are "commuting" during and through this (from the pics), but it's hard to get a real sense about how surrounded they are. I see on a map main fire is northwest of LA, but there are fires at different points around it. IF they get going, how will folk be able to move to safety?
     
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  16. Dr. Tweedbucket

    Dr. Tweedbucket Deluxe model available !!!11

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    The fires are bad enough, but if all the vegetation is burned off the hills and you happen to have a really wet winter, then it turns into mudslide season. It was pretty mud slidey when I lived out there. Got a ticket for driving around a road / lane half blocked by a mudslide (going left of the double yellow line to get around the mud). California cops, there is just no word for them :fisticuffs
     
  17. Fred Farkus

    Fred Farkus Member

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    We got all the stupid comments in September during Hurricane Irma.

    Your turn.
     
  18. Phletch

    Phletch Member

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    Most people here consider Dec 1 the beginning of winter, June 1 the beginning of summer, etc. Solstices just mark the shortest and longest days of the year for all practical purposes.

    But, having lived in SoCal for 13 years, the fire season generally is the fall where conditions from the dry, hot summers just tend to create a tinder box. Combine that with the Santa Ana winds, and a fire is almost inevitable somewhere. Combine that with the human element, and the probability just goes up.

    As has been mentioned, these fires have always been around. It's just that there are SO MANY people living in areas where people never used to live en masse that the effects are exacerbated.

    Personally, I'll take a hurricane any day over a fire. At least with a hurricane you get more than ample warning to prepare.
     
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  19. Spec

    Spec Supporting Member

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    Fires here burn through pretty quickly. It's just chest high brush for the most part, no timber. You can watch the fire advancing as a line and behind there's not much fire, everything burns away fast.

    Lots of roads and big freeways of course, it's fairly safe to be upwind. Typically the police will let traffic through in that case.
     
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  20. Mark Robinson

    Mark Robinson Member

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    Most years we get at least some rain by this time of year. That usually marks the end of the wildfire risk for the year. There is zero consistency to the precipitation on the west coast because of ocean current influence. Any longer, there is no such thing as normal rain. In the case of "El Nino" we'll get more than average, and it can begin in October, as it did the year we chose to do a major remodel and we got an inch of rain overnight, and a few solid days of rain, most of which came into my roofless house, obliterating the ceilings, drywall and floors. It's my fault for trusting a crew of drunks to be able to tarp a house in a professional manner.

    The chaparall and the eucalyptus that folks have put in over the years, burn with great enthusiasm. By this time, hillbound folks should know that there is risk, and there is insurance.

    The latest trend is that aging power lines, often privately owned by PGE and Edison, are falling in high winds and sparking off fire. It's said to be likely that the Sonoma fires and possibly one of the present fires are possibly caused this way. So we'll see if that can be managed one supposes.
     

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