calling all aluminum neck players...

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by crimson on pink, Jun 28, 2006.


  1. crimson on pink

    crimson on pink Supporting Member

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    alright, thinking about making the jump from my beloved guild to an aluminum neck guitar. played a kramer aluminum neck bass(yes, i know a bass not the guitar but wanted to feel the neck to see if they really are cold or whatever some say, wasn't) through an old ampeg v4 and a 2x15 marshall cab. loved the deepness of it. so anyone own a kramer aluminum neck, like the dmz2000 or 650g, travis bean artist, etc. please step in and give opinoins, good or bad. my friend steve, who has had a wedge, two other beans, and a veleno, is def not helping this gas. but before i drop some dough(esp with tour coming up) i need to hear opinions. also, if you're within a few hours of toledo, and maybe wanna jam and stuff if you own one, i'd be willing to drive, get some food, drink some beers, have a good ol' time. anyway, sorry for the long post, i def appreciate the responses and opinions. thanks.
     
  2. Chrome Dinette

    Chrome Dinette Silver Supporting Member

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    I had a Kramer aluminum necked guitar with two humbuckers and I liked the way it sounded. It didn't sound that different from a normal guitar, however. I ended up selling it because I didn't like how heavy(and neck-heavy) it was.

    The bass player in my band uses a Kramer Duke that has had the frets ripped out and it sounds terrible with no effects. Since he is always using some sort of filter sweep and/or distortion, that is not a problem.

    Beans and Velenos may be different animals, altogether. Both have a good bit more aluminum in them than the Kramer, spanning the whole string length.
     
  3. crimson on pink

    crimson on pink Supporting Member

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    cool. thanks for the input. i had a sg that was terribely neck heavy but that really doesn't bother me as i never let go of it. haha.
     
  4. Barefoot

    Barefoot Senior Member

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    On impulse a DMZ 2000 came home with me a few years ago. The original DiMarzio pups sounded surprisingly good. Pretty strong but balanced. Not mushy. Lots of switching options. Neck felt good. I think it has an ebony board. Always thought the DMZ would be killer set up for slide work...

    My son periodically runs through my back room stash of guitars and always pulled out the Kramer. Last year he switched over to the aluminum necked Kramer bass. He likes it and sounds pretty good.
     
  5. pfflam

    pfflam Silver Supporting Member

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    Where are the pictures in this thread? :)
     
  6. 6AM

    6AM Supporting Member

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    A friend of mind has a Bean. It's neat, but the fretboard is very flat. Feels kinda weird to me. Which I guess has nothing to do with the neck. ;)
     
  7. alberob

    alberob Member

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    I have aTB1000 standard and a Travis Bean bass The only thing I don't like is the weight.They make Les Paul seem light in comparison.As far as the 0 radius fingerboard,the best for slide I own.They also sustain forever!:RoCkIn
     
  8. SkatePunk

    SkatePunk Member

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    I had a 1980 Kramer XL5 some time back. It had the aluminum neck, split headstock, synthetic fretboard, and DiMarzio pickups. It was heavy!
     
  9. The Golden Boy

    The Golden Boy Member

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    I had a Travis Bean (s/n 117). Although it's kind of unfair for me to be objective about this- I really did not like that guitar. It was excessively HEAVY, it was really bright, the nut was SUPER narrow,and I unfortunately owned that guitar over winter. That neck would retain both heat and cold. I remember one show, the neck was ice cold, and the bar had a radiator, so I figured I'd warm it up... bad idea.

    Although it was "cool," that guitar was not a keeper.
     
  10. pfflam

    pfflam Silver Supporting Member

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    10 posts and not a single pic?!?!
     
  11. KennyM

    KennyM Supporting Member

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    Golden Boy's post made me think back to my days gigging around the Detroit area back when those Travis Bean guitars came out. I knew a few people that bought them during the summer months thinking what a great idea to combat warped necks due to the extreme Michigan winters. Well, good idea at least until you throw it in the trunk of your car and take a 45 minute drive to your gig in January. I'm sure I don't have to spell it out, but everytime I see that scene in "A Christmas Story" where the stupid kid puts his tongue on the frozen metal fence, I picture the bass player I gigged with and his aluminum neck bass.

    Needless to say, I'd make sure you live in friendly climates before picking one of these up.

    Kenny M.
     
  12. LHakim

    LHakim Member

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    Proud alum neck player here! In fact a 1976 Travis Bean Standard (sn#1047) has been my only or main guitar since 1980. I also own a 1967 Guild Starfire II that also sounds fantatstic, but simply can't approach the Travis Bean for sheer playability.


    I bought my Travis Bean from the twin brother of a friend up in Detroit. The ONLY time the neck was a pain in winter was when we would reherse in an unheated building. I live in Mississippi now and have no problems with intonation etc. In fact I can leave the Bean on a guitar stand after a hard night of playing, come back a week later and its still in tune!


    Around 9 years ago I began trying out other vintage and high end guitars such as McInturff, PRS, Gibson Historic Reissues (several of those) etc. and would ALWAYS come back home thanking the GOOD LORD for my Travis Bean. Interestingly the guitar that came closest to it in tone and playability was an original '59 Les Paul sunburst w/PAF's.

    Ironically I have never played another Bean so can't give out general comments on how they sound except to say that based on comments I've received from past Travis Bean owners such as Bill Chapin, Jim Rolph, Lindy Fralin and Don Butler, Beans were/are not as uniform in tone as you might think.

    I love to let guitarists who have never played/heard a Travis Bean in person try mine out. Invariably after they get their jaw off the ground they beg me to sell it to them!
     
  13. Chris Rice

    Chris Rice Member

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    I played a Kramer "The Duke" bass for about 4 years. I was also playing a Pedulla MVP at the time, and the Kramer could hold it's own. It had a funky tone that I liked, and I never had trouble with a cold neck, gigging through Chicago winters. It had the T-shaped aluminum neck with wood strips, painted black.

    My dad had another Kramer bass with aluminum neck. I never bonded with that one, it was half fretted and half fretless.
     

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