Calling Out to Builders…Favorite Jigs, Templates, Tips & Techniques

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by pinefd, Jun 3, 2008.

  1. Mike Navarro

    Mike Navarro Member

    Messages:
    106
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Correction!! the aluminium top in my Gemini duplicator is 3/8"
     
  2. Scott Lentz

    Scott Lentz Member

    Messages:
    121
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Location:
    San Marcos Ca.
    The side dot and top dot drill plate is one of those items that one always puts off until you use it! We use a electric drill for the side dots and the drill press with a .250 drill for the top dots. The side dots are made from PVC welding rod white or black and require a number drill bushing as well as drill bit.
     
  3. Mike Navarro

    Mike Navarro Member

    Messages:
    106
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Thanks Semore!! The blue one was for $2,200.00, but I don't do anymore those models, I just have it there for record, I can make the same concept with my new bolt on model (as the rosewood & cooper candy) with my headstock & body shape, I have more models coming up in bolt on & set neck, the "Guitar Zone" web site is about the shop and services (repairs, custom works etc), the Navarro Guitars web page is under construction and soon you can check my new models!

    [​IMG]

    The head stock in my set neck guitars is diferent than the bolt on, this one is one of my set neck models in progress
     
  4. Pedro58

    Pedro58 Member

    Messages:
    5,447
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
    Location:
    North Texas
    I like your headstock shape, Navarro! Very cool.
     
  5. Dingwall

    Dingwall Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Interesting. We do our side dots the exact same way using the same PVC material (when it's not pearl). You jig looks a lot nicer than ours though.
     
  6. guitar_builder

    guitar_builder Member

    Messages:
    2
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2008
    I am pretty new to building guitars I've built a few and starting to sell some. This thread has given me lots of ideas. Now if I could just figure out how to build Saul's neck shaping jig.
     
  7. Mike Navarro

    Mike Navarro Member

    Messages:
    106
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Guitar Builder, I think Saul will help you if you send him a personal email, I think all of us here has the same intention to help the new builders, just send him a mail!

    http://guitarzonepr.com
     
  8. anyone

    anyone Member

    Messages:
    1,683
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2006
    Location:
    a pretty how town
    My favorite thread needs a bump.
     
  9. Brett Faust

    Brett Faust Member

    Messages:
    844
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Location:
    USA
    Here is an easy one for those that use fretwire that comes in a large roll.Finding the end quickly can be a pain, so I use wire nuts screwed onto the ends to make it easier.
     
  10. dougk

    dougk Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    5,793
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2008
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    Thought I'd bump this thread. I built a few of these the other day. I've been working on a with a way of clamping the fretboard and making sure that it doesn't shift around during the process. So here's what I came up with:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Basically a same idea as last time with some changes. Once side has fixed blocks that will come up to just below fretboard height. The other side has cammed clamps that rotate and pinch everything into place.
    [​IMG]
    neck glued up
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    fretboard pinched into place
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Simple clamping caul, this time its just 1/2" plywood. The last ones were 3/4" and radiused to match but honestly the 1/2" ply bends just about right on its own.

    edit: its not in the pictures but I have a couple guide pieces that go on top the board under the clamping board to apply pressure evenly everywhere.
     
  11. Roman Rist

    Roman Rist Member

    Messages:
    81
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    I am so glad this thread has been bumped back to the top.

    Thanks to Frank Pine for starting it and all the folks contributing to it!

    Roman
     
  12. courtney2018

    courtney2018 Member

    Messages:
    54
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2009
    Location:
    South Florida

    There's alot of cool jigs in here. Does anyone else use CNCs to build? That's what I use. I've got a few things that I use, but nothing terribly tricky.

     
  13. Malinoski

    Malinoski everything wrong possible

    Messages:
    2,084
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Location:
    Maryland, USA
    I make my guitars rather slowly so my techniques are from the age of dinosaurs. And I am not sure how most guys cut fret slots but I use a simple miter jig, shown with a traditional backsaw here but I have since upgraded to a Japanese pull saw:

    [​IMG]

    This is about as fancy as it gets for me, a router jig to radius the fretboard:

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Bruce Bennett

    Bruce Bennett Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,106
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Location:
    Rossville Ga
    Although this is not really a jig.

    I just finished (ran the first test piece like an hour ago) my Fret slotting saw. works like a charm. powers through ebony like butter. Still have a few safety guards to make for it now.:aok

    Our shop has really been comeing along now for the last year and a half and we are just about to hit it hard.

     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2009
  15. Rick Maguire

    Rick Maguire Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    151
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2009
    Location:
    Wakefield,RI
    Really cool stuff so far here guys. I definitely got some ideas from this thread so I too will share.

    Below is my fretboard station. I radius my fretboards before they meet the neck, so they get slotted and bound, then carpet taped to pieces of plexiglas that index into a multi-use sled/jig where inlay and radiusing takes place.

    This is an inlay router I made for repeatable and accurate inlay work. The key is the stainless steel collet that rides the template to cut the pearl(or other material) which is glued to a sacrificial piece of wood. In the photo is my standard diamond pattern template. I have also made templates for block and trapezoid patterns and more will come as requested.
    [​IMG]
    Here is a close up of the router. The little brass donut on the bench is a secondary collet that slips over the primary collet and offsets the cut by the thickness of the cutter, allowing me to cut the inlay pockets with the same template. I made 20 of these secondary collets in .001" increments to allow for different cutter widths and varying machine runout due to differing wood densities and such. With this analog machine I get cnc results. After cleaning out the corners with a tiny chisel the inlays snap fit in the pockets with just a little finger pressure. I love this thing.
    [​IMG]
    Also note the vacuum port holes. They are actually quite effective in extracting the dust and they also create some serious grab on the template which makes the operation very smooth. There is also a very low power air pump pushing air through the collet, keeping the collet dust free and cooling the bit off as well. The first one of these that I made did not have the air pump feature and the collet got clogged with gooey rosewood dust in about 6 seconds and melted the plexi. Boo. No problems since the blower feature though.


    This is the radius jig. The radiused router rails ride on the steel rods of the carriage to traverse the width of the fretboard while the carriage itself slides up and down the length of the fretboard. I use a sharp 1/4" spiral carbide bit and it cuts a clean consistent radius(inlays and all) to within .002". Clean up starts with 400 grit and your off to the races.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    This is my favorite shop fixture. It is a 1960's hydraulic dentist's chair base. It has 16" of travel and 360 degree rotation. I outfitted it with a 90 degree tilt base and the jigs and fixtures can spin on that. With this thing I can get any part of a guitar anywhere I want it.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Sawarow

    Sawarow Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    595
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Location:
    Temecula, CA

    I'm using a CNC to make guitars and should be releasing the first few soon. Below is the body jig I use to hold the bodies to the CNC. There are 4 1/4" locating pins I drill locating holes in the body blank. The pins allow me to flip the board over and cut from the opposite side. I can drill T style bridge holes from both sides of a blank and they match up perfectly.

    [​IMG]

    Below is the body jig with a T style 1/2" ash top I cut out. Note the "tabs" left in the body to hold it to the blank.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Below is my neck jig with a finished neck sitting inside what's left of the neck blank

    [​IMG]

    Of course there are jigs for the non CNC cuts like the electrosocket, headstock trussrod hole, and side marker jigs. These jigs were made using the CNC.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. JBG

    JBG Member

    Messages:
    495
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    My clamping jig for gluing fretboards:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Slotting boards:
    [​IMG]
     
  18. Dave Coke

    Dave Coke Member

    Messages:
    28
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Location:
    Michigan
    Haha! AWESOME! :bow:bow:bow:bow:bow :love:
     
  19. mullytron

    mullytron Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,256
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Location:
    right behind you
    That is so f'ing badass I can't stand it. Kudos sir

    Thanks for all the insight gentlemen.
     
  20. Bruce Bennett

    Bruce Bennett Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,106
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Location:
    Rossville Ga
    Don't know if this qualifies as a jig. but it's something i borrowed from the Tobias shop.

    It a 7' long I-beam thats been milled flat on both sides and is used as a glue up rig for Fingerboards.

    I can glue 3 necks per edge for a total of 12 when useing both sides.

    the beam is mounted on a stand that allows it to rotate so that both sides are useable. and all the clamps are stored on the stretcher between the stands.

    We radius our fingerboards before glueup and that requires a special glueing caul made from two 1/4" rods and a flexible steel shim that curves to conform to the radius of the board.

    the last photo is how it looks during the glueup.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]





    [​IMG]





    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice