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Can anyone even play this chord? Or is Al Dimeola just a joker

leziv

Member
Messages
59
So I recently picked up a copy of Al Dimeola's A Guide to Chords, Scales and Arpeggios. I've been going through the lessons and I came across this Bm6 shape:

E---X---
B---X---
G---1---
D---4---
A---5---
E---7---

I know there are many other more playable/comfortable variations of Bm6, I was just wondering if this was a realistic shape for anyone to ever use. I have fairly big hands but I certainly don't have the finger flexibility to play this.
 

JonR

Member
Messages
15,527
FWIW, I can just about make my (average-sized) fingers do that, but I agree it's a crazy, unrealistic shape. I'm guessing it's not designed to be playable as a simultaneous whole, at least not by normal human beings - maybe as a separated arpeggio? - although it might be practical higher up the neck for other chords.
Essentially it's a theoretical entity: a close-voiced root position Bm6 (1-3-5-6). In practice the average (sensible) guitarist will play some kind of open voicing or drop voicing, because those are the only practical ones.
 

frankencat

Guitarded
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
13,401
I can play it as

E---X---
B---X---
G---1---
D---4---
A---2---
E---5---

But even that is a little crazy.
 

Super Locrian

Member
Messages
1,507
My impression is that there's hardly any editing or proofreading being done any more for music publications. I doubt Al di Meola wrote that book himself, wouldn't surprise me if it was written by a music student working as an intern for the publishing company. All I know, is that no real guitar players uses that kind of fingering.
 

Phletch

Senior Member
Messages
9,896
FWIW, I can just about make my (average-sized) fingers do that, but I agree it's a crazy, unrealistic shape. I'm guessing it's not designed to be playable as a simultaneous whole, at least not by normal human beings - maybe as a separated arpeggio? - although it might be practical higher up the neck for other chords.
Essentially it's a theoretical entity: a close-voiced root position Bm6 (1-3-5-6). In practice the average (sensible) guitarist will play some kind of open voicing or drop voicing, because those are the only practical ones.
That's kind of what I was thinking. I was also thinking that it's the product of somebody (or the software) at the publishing/editing cadre "spelling out" a closed-voice, root position chord on consecutive strings and printing the chord diagram*. It may have some practical value to somebody, maybe even Al, but not me.

I may be wrong, but when I see a m6 chord on a chart, it's rare and usually there for a reason, most often as part of some sort of ascending or descending chromatic movement toward or away from the root: m6 - m7 - min or min - min7 - min6 ("My Funny Valentine").

It would be much more practical to play 7 5 4 x x 4, but depending on the context (the chords before and after it and the voice leading) I wouldn't be too concerned about closed-voiced root position and would more likely play x x 6 7 7 7 (Bm/Ab) or 7 x 6 7 7 x(or7) or even just an inverted Ab diminished triad like x x x 4 3 4 or x x x 7 9 7 and call it a day.

*EDIT: @Super Locrian beat me to it as I was typing.
 

Scrapperz

Member
Messages
12,508
So I recently picked up a copy of Al Dimeola's A Guide to Chords, Scales and Arpeggios. I've been going through the lessons and I came across this Bm6 shape:

E---X---
B---X---
G---1---
D---4---
A---5---
E---7---

I know there are many other more playable/comfortable variations of Bm6, I was just wondering if this was a realistic shape for anyone to ever use. I have fairly big hands but I certainly don't have the finger flexibility to play this.
Maybe with a little help from your friends. lol
 

StevenA

Senior Member
Messages
3,976
It would be much more practical to play 7 5 4 x x 4, but depending on the context (the chords before and after it and the voice leading) I wouldn't be too concerned about closed-voiced root position and would more likely play x x 6 7 7 7 (Bm/Ab) or 7 x 6 7 7 x(or7) or even just an inverted Ab diminished triad like x x x 4 3 4 or x x x 7 9 7 and call it a day.
I don't really know any m6 positions, but I know many m7b5 fingerings and their inversions!
 

Bluesful

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
42,062
most often as part of some sort of ascending or descending chromatic movement toward or away from the root: m6 - m7 - min or min - min7 - min6 ("My Funny Valentine").
Yeah, I think In A Sentimental Mood has the m7-m6 move as well.

My favourite voicing (as a Cmin6) is:

3
4
2
x
3
x
 

NeuroLogic

Member
Messages
1,424
My impression is that there's hardly any editing or proofreading being done any more for music publications. I doubt Al di Meola wrote that book himself, wouldn't surprise me if it was written by a music student working as an intern for the publishing company. All I know, is that no real guitar players uses that kind of fingering.
Johnny Smith used chords like this routinely. Several others with virtuoso abilities also do. There is an advantage in that tone improves with further distance between the individual notes. Certainly not a must (i.e. Joe Pass, etc.) but definitely beneficial.
 

JonR

Member
Messages
15,527
That's kind of what I was thinking. I was also thinking that it's the product of somebody (or the software) at the publishing/editing cadre "spelling out" a closed-voice, root position chord on consecutive strings and printing the chord diagram*.
Sounds highly likely. More likely than any guitarist actually playing it anyhow.
I may be wrong, but when I see a m6 chord on a chart, it's rare and usually there for a reason, most often as part of some sort of ascending or descending chromatic movement toward or away from the root: m6 - m7 - min or min - min7 - min6 ("My Funny Valentine").
You also get m6 chords used as tonic minor chords - quite often by implication if not overtly stated. The m6 chord was quite popular as a basic minor form in gypsy jazz.
 






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