Can Anyone Recommend Ear Training Resources, very happy to buy them

Oneofthe

Member
Messages
254
Just for some background. I literally own EarmasterPro but, but, but I do not recommend it one bit because it has real, real bad side effects. For some reason you'll start hearing Chuck Berry and you can't stop it but there are other worse side effects with it.

So, I'm looking for some Ear Training Resources. Having a great experience, finding it invaluable, with the David Oakes book I thought I would try MI's Ear Training Book to start. Does anyone have any experience with it?


There are a few other books out there but they are reading books without audio and they are probably used to accompany Ear Training Programs.

There are some apps out there but I'm not certain if they are any good. Anyone try them?

There are some online websites but I'm not certain if they are any good. Anyone work with them?

Or is this just something I have to get a private tutor for? I can always look online at

https://www.lessonface.com/


Anyone have any guidance on Ear Training. Thanks.
 

Clifford-D

Member
Messages
17,050
Learn to sing pitch. You don't need a good voice and you can do it under your breath

When you sing a correct pitch, you are directly referencing that pitch in your brain.

I've been teaching guitar as my day job for twenty eight years. I've noticed how weak many of my students pitch was. I would play/sing a pitch like A. The student would sing back a pitch absolutely off. The answer is in listening, a type of listening that always seemed foreign to them. These students didn't hear the difference between the pitch from the guitar and their singing. It sounded the same to them.

What is music like for people that have no accuracy in pitch?

I've had success with pretty much all my students, with the exception of a couple.

If a course helps you sing correct pitch then that course may be a good way to go. It has little to do with the guitar, everything to do with your sense of pitch and being able to accurately sing it. If you can do that, you can do it on the guitar. But it starts with hearing/singing correct pitch.
 

PaulHudgins

Member
Messages
590
May sound strange but for me the best ear training tool is a looper pedal. You can go through the same kind of exercises as a book but also play at the same time. Which to me is valuable, because while it is great to be able to identify chords and intervals, IMO.. it is even better to be able to know how to identify them by sound and know where they are in relation on the fretboard. You can lay down a drone note and go through interval relationships, chord types, modes, etc.
 

dingusmingus

Member
Messages
121
Just for some background. I literally own EarmasterPro but, but, but I do not recommend it one bit because it has real, real bad side effects. For some reason you'll start hearing Chuck Berry and you can't stop it but there are other worse side effects with it.

So, I'm looking for some Ear Training Resources. Having a great experience, finding it invaluable, with the David Oakes book I thought I would try MI's Ear Training Book to start. Does anyone have any experience with it?


There are a few other books out there but they are reading books without audio and they are probably used to accompany Ear Training Programs.

There are some apps out there but I'm not certain if they are any good. Anyone try them?

There are some online websites but I'm not certain if they are any good. Anyone work with them?

Or is this just something I have to get a private tutor for? I can always look online at

https://www.lessonface.com/


Anyone have any guidance on Ear Training. Thanks.
I've used that book and found it well worth the modest price. The actual audio examples are fine, but not necessarily better than the many free online ear training resources for hearing intervals, chord quality, etc. But the book provides a nice framework for the basics of ear training, like you'd do in a class.
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
21,863
Ear Sharpener app is great.
Any time you put in trying to learn your favorite lick, by ear, will train your ear. There aren't many shortcuts.
 

70 Mach 1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,099
i self trained my ear. it took a long long long time in my case. start off easy with songs you already know to get your ear in motion with something friendly. tune up to the song and start picking out notes and chords one by one. listen for open strings popping out. listen for any minor chords that will stand out right away in the progression
also use a slow down sampler that does not change the pitch and just work at it about 10 minutes a day. if you go at it too long everything will start to sound the same.

also listen to some other genres of music and just start to play what you hear. throw any theory out the window at this point. just play what you hear. imo if you apply theory at this time your brain will tell you its wrong and it cant be right and you will never get the right notes or chords or timing.

YMMV but this is how i did it going back 40 years now. so any time i cant figure something out I just go back to step one and work up one note/chord at a time.
 

meowtorhead

Member
Messages
403
Have you tried playing along with the TV? Figuring out commercials is a great practice drill, as well as regular old TV shows since the music tends to switch often.
 

ZeyerGTR

Member
Messages
3,833
That was a good read, thanks for sharing. My wife and I bought the Perfect Pitch course probably... 15+ years ago? We started, but never spent time past the first couple of lessons. I was cleaning out the closets a couple months ago when I came across it and figured, what the heck, it's time. I'm going slowly and methodically through the lessons, practicing almost every day. I can say that my ears are opening up quite well, but I can also say wow, do I have a long ways to go! Whether or not I actually get perfect pitch (or stick with it long enough) it has been very good for my ear. So far (up to lesson 7) it's all listening and singing: play 3rds harmonically and sing from bottom up, play random pitches more than an octave apart and sing them bottom up, play any three notes harmonically and sing them from the bottom up, etc. It's definitely slow going, but I'm in no hurry.
 

chill

Member
Messages
485
I make ear training flash cards, all on the computer, quick and for free. I am basically following the above mentioned David Burge course outline. I use an online piano I found through google, record it using Audacity, and import it into a free program/app called Anki. Anki lets me make sound based flash cards and has a nice algorithm to get the info into long term memory. Try it and see.

As a by and by, I am very surprised no one has asked about this.
Just for some background. I literally own EarmasterPro but, but, but I do not recommend it one bit because it has real, real bad side effects. For some reason you'll start hearing Chuck Berry and you can't stop it but there are other worse side effects with it.
How the holy heck does Earmaster make one hear Chuck Berry nonstop and what are the worse side effects.
 

m_b

Member
Messages
181
Have a look at Meludia. It is a web-based app. The authors are French, but there's an English version. They have quite a few prestigious endorsements. It's not expensive. There's a trial version. I bought the 3-month subscription. They recommend a period of use of several months up to a year. I've only had two days with it so far so I can't speak of any results, but I really like what I'm hearing, and seeing so far.
Edit: I forgot to mention the book Primacy of the Ear by Ran Blake, awesome book, very demanding. Although I haven't been diligent with it, I'm pretty sure anyone who did the exercises for one year as he recommends would develop a pair of outstanding ears.
 
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lhallam

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
17,246
That was a good read, thanks for sharing. My wife and I bought the Perfect Pitch course probably... 15+ years ago? We started, but never spent time past the first couple of lessons. I was cleaning out the closets a couple months ago when I came across it and figured, what the heck, it's time. I'm going slowly and methodically through the lessons, practicing almost every day. I can say that my ears are opening up quite well, but I can also say wow, do I have a long ways to go! Whether or not I actually get perfect pitch (or stick with it long enough) it has been very good for my ear. So far (up to lesson 7) it's all listening and singing: play 3rds harmonically and sing from bottom up, play random pitches more than an octave apart and sing them bottom up, play any three notes harmonically and sing them from the bottom up, etc. It's definitely slow going, but I'm in no hurry.

There is a difference between the Relative Pitch course and the Perfect Pitch course. From your description I think you meant the relative pitch course which is the review I linked to.

I never finished the course completely. I got stymied on one of the tests where you are supposed to get 100% and I just couldn't get through it. The test is like 10 minutes long of nothing but various 9th chords. That said, I still recommend the Relative Pitch course. Even if I didn't get through the whole thing, my ears are 100% better than they used to be. I don't recommend the Perfect Pitch course though.

Keep at it and you should notice results.
 

ZeyerGTR

Member
Messages
3,833
I also made a bunch of 5 minute loops of various things: major/minor 3rds, random intervals, etc. When I'm away from my guitar I can do
There is a difference between the Relative Pitch course and the Perfect Pitch course. From your description I think you meant the relative pitch course which is the review I linked to.

I never finished the course completely. I got stymied on one of the tests where you are supposed to get 100% and I just couldn't get through it. The test is like 10 minutes long of nothing but various 9th chords. That said, I still recommend the Relative Pitch course. Even if I didn't get through the whole thing, my ears are 100% better than they used to be. I don't recommend the Perfect Pitch course though.

Keep at it and you should notice results.
It actually is the perfect pitch course. He spends a lot of time early on with what he calls "culturing the ear," and that's where I'm at. It certainly feels like a lot of relative pitch training at this stage, imho, but it's also opening up the ear to hear nuance better. Well, that's what he says, we'll see how well it works. It's not so much "recognize a minor 3rd" or "recognize a 7th chord" as it is "hear two or three distinct tones for what they are." There's also a lot of connecting your voice to the pitch you hear.
 

lhallam

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
17,246
I also made a bunch of 5 minute loops of various things: major/minor 3rds, random intervals, etc. When I'm away from my guitar I can do
It actually is the perfect pitch course. He spends a lot of time early on with what he calls "culturing the ear," and that's where I'm at. It certainly feels like a lot of relative pitch training at this stage, imho, but it's also opening up the ear to hear nuance better. Well, that's what he says, we'll see how well it works. It's not so much "recognize a minor 3rd" or "recognize a 7th chord" as it is "hear two or three distinct tones for what they are." There's also a lot of connecting your voice to the pitch you hear.
Thanks for the clarification. I also reviewed the perfect pitch course here on TGP.

I think I was getting some results and then gave up. I'm not sure anymore.

I can get pretty close to tuning my guitar without a reference if the pitches are within a whole step or so. I can't do it if they are way off. For some reason as I tune, the notes just begin to sound right. When I check them with a tuner, they are very close and sometimes dead on.

Hope you get some rewarding results from your efforts. I would be curious if you find improvement.
 

alltogether

Member
Messages
83
I make ear training flash cards, all on the computer, quick and for free. I am basically following the above mentioned David Burge course outline. I use an online piano I found through google, record it using Audacity, and import it into a free program/app called Anki. Anki lets me make sound based flash cards and has a nice algorithm to get the info into long term memory. Try it and see.
That's a cool idea, would you mind sharing the cards you made?
 




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