Can play some blues and open chords, where to go next?

Messages
7
Been playing guitar for 2 months and have to a stage where I can play a couple of songs (Sunshine of Your Love, Smoke on the Water, All Right Now), I can do open chords and I can do the 12 Bar shuffle and play some licks. However, I'm a bit lost now at what to do next since the internet is such a huge resource and there isn't much set direction as to what I should start learning next. Just some advice would be great.
 

Mark Robinson

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
8,784
To learn quickly, a teacher is most likely the fastest path. Here is why I think so:
If you have a lesson scheduled, you are more likely to practice diligently.
With a teacher, you get very prompt resolutions to simple misunderstandings.
Teachers normally know lots of songs, and are very good at figuring songs out.


To me, learning songs is where it's at. You master the techniques needed for each piece, and you end up with a body of skills which can be applied.
 

ZeyerGTR

Member
Messages
3,938
What do you want to do? Your goals will guide what to do next. Finding a teacher is a good suggestion because they can definitely help you figure that out, and what to do about it.
 
Messages
7
The best thing would be to get a good private teacher, but failing that I would suggest checking out www.justinguitar.com.

Justin Sandercoe has an extensive, free beginners guitar course (found here: http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-000-BeginnersCourse.php).

His style is very friendly and non-intimidating.

Each lesson builds on the previous lesson, so you should watch all of them, even if it is just review.
I checked out the website and it's pretty awesome. I will try out the beginner course for sure. Thanks for the recommendation.

To learn quickly, a teacher is most likely the fastest path. Here is why I think so:
If you have a lesson scheduled, you are more likely to practice diligently.
With a teacher, you get very prompt resolutions to simple misunderstandings.
Teachers normally know lots of songs, and are very good at figuring songs out.


To me, learning songs is where it's at. You master the techniques needed for each piece, and you end up with a body of skills which can be applied.
Unfortunately private tutors just aren't really an option for me, since my parents really don't have the money for it. I am currently learning lots of Cream songs since they are fairly easy to play and seem to be a good level for me. I'll definitely try out some other songs though.

What do you want to do? Your goals will guide what to do next. Finding a teacher is a good suggestion because they can definitely help you figure that out, and what to do about it.
To be honest, the trouble is is that my goal is to be a good well-rounded player of many different genres, so I can't figure out what to do next which will further that goal.
 

Lephty

Member
Messages
1,584
In the way of general advice, I'd start checking out some of the basics of music theory--the major scale, chord construction, and chord progressions. Then check out the modes, which are basically just an extension of the major scale. That'll take you a long way.

Keep learning songs too, but try to understand them in theoretical terms so you really start to understand why songs are put together the way they are.

After that it's a question of where you want to go with it--composition? Improvisation? Different genres? All of the above?
 

Clifford-D

Senior Member
Messages
17,046
Learn the stuff you know in new areas of the neck.


That's like a "duh" thing to say but it's true.

What are the notes (tones) in a given chord? Let's use the chord C. Take note of the notes that make up the chord (C E G), learn, I mean "own" the simple idea, don't make it hard, it isn't.

Any difficulty with this stuff comes from misunderstanding definitions, have a dictionary and internet handy!!!


This is how it works, here in these grids are all the notes of the basic C chord as it moves up the neck. FORGET any names of notes for now, just use your ear and wild spirit , your job,, if you choose to accept it, would be to see/own all five of these C chord shapes in this simple "five shape" grid I wrote out. If it clicks you can be playing up the neck tonight.

This is the basic stuff that everyone is talking about as far as learning the neck,
REALISE that you do know these shapes/areas up the neck by knowing the first position, well!!

Try to play these shapes as lines instead of chords. ie;

l---------G shape-------l-------A shape-----l
----------------3--8--------12--8
-------------5---------5--8------------8
----------5--------------------------9---------9
-------5-----------------------------------10
----7----------------------------------------------10
-8------------------------------------------------------8--- etc...

The CAGED shapes,

-C-----A-----G-----E----D
-0-----3-----8-----8----12
-1-----5-----5-----8----13
-0-----5-----5-----9----12
-2-----5-----5----10----10
-3-----3-----7----10----12
-3-----3-----8-----8-----12
 
Last edited:

LoneFurrow

Member
Messages
19
To be honest, the trouble is is that my goal is to be a good well-rounded player of many different genres, so I can't figure out what to do next which will further that goal.
Hi there,

You're right that there are almost too many places to look for information.

One source I really like is Truefire.com. There are a huge number of courses on there, albeit for a fee of around $40 per course. Robben Ford's Chord Revolutions: Foundations (http://truefire.com/robben-ford/chord-revolution-foundations/) might be a good place to start.

I've also found Joseph Alexander's Fundamental Changes website (http://www.fundamental-changes.com/) to be very useful.

HTH
 

weenerdoggs

What's Up Dogg?
Messages
1,121
The best thing would be to get a good private teacher, but failing that I would suggest checking out www.justinguitar.com.

Justin Sandercoe has an extensive, free beginners guitar course (found here: http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-000-BeginnersCourse.php).

His style is very friendly and non-intimidating.

Each lesson builds on the previous lesson, so you should watch all of them, even if it is just review.
Well it sounds like you are making some great progress!
I think this is a great starting point too! Justin is a great teacher and fine player. We are fortunate he has put much together.

Another good bit of advice is to find someone cool who knows more than you and do some basic jamming. That will light the fire in you and it is some of the most fun you will ever have.

The great thing is that the universe of music is ever expanding and as long as you show interest there is always something cool to learn and experience.

Have fun!
 

JonR

Member
Messages
15,256
To be honest, the trouble is is that my goal is to be a good well-rounded player of many different genres, so I can't figure out what to do next which will further that goal.
I'd say find songs you like and learn them (or artists you like). Don't pick songs because they seem easy, or because someone else says they're a good idea. You have to love a song enough to work it out right through to the end - not just a cool riff, or chord sequence.
It's a good goal to want to be an all-rounder, but you have to have some kind of specific enthusiasm to start with. Even if you did get a teacher, they're not going to give you that.
You have to find your way to whatever (or whoever) excites you about guitar, and follow that route. Whatever it takes to keep you practising until your fingers bleed :). (If nothing excites you that much, stop now! The world needs no more guitarists; it's you that has to feel the need to play.)
Even if there's no specific tune or player that gets you - maybe it's just the guitar itself that excites you, or music in general? - the key is the enthusiasm. Without that, you're nowhere.

But you sound like you're doing well after just 2 months, if you can do all you say. Can you play those songs the whole way through?

In terms of basic technical goals, I'd say work on (a) barre chords, (b) chord changing, (c) keeping time, and rhythmic feel in general. The latter is often under-emphasised, in all the advice about scales, modes, etc. If you've got good time, you'll sound great even playing simple stuff.
 

bobmc

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,532
A huge leap for me was when an older guy should me a simple chord melody style version of Sleepwalk. The chords had to be moved around the neck, interconnected by the melody and harmony. It was the first time music came out a guitar I was holding.

The tune may not work for you or be of interest, there are exactly eleventeen million other tunes to choose from.
 
Messages
7
Thanks for all the great advice to those who replied. My parents have decided they can stretch their budget and let me have a one hour lesson every 2 weeks, which is great news. I've decided to start learning Badge but it's ttickier than other songs I've learnt before. I've been spending time learning A minor pentatonic scales along the whole fretboard so I can improvise in different places on the fretboard. I'm gonna also use Justin's website to teach myself some music theory as well. For now I'm gonna focus on Blues/blues rock but after I've got to a stage at which I can play blues decently, I'll try jazz.
 






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