Can someone please post an example of a common core problem a 6 yr old has for homework?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Scrapperz, Oct 28, 2019.

Do you like “Common Core”

  1. Yes

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    13.9%
  2. No

    57 vote(s)
    72.2%
  3. Other

    11 vote(s)
    13.9%
  1. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Silver Supporting Member

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    Fact: the US is falling behind, or at least, stagnating in objective testing of math skills. The "way we used to do it" wasn't keeping up, and whatever we've been trying to do with implementation of "new math" hasn't helped either.
    The one thing that we KNOW wasn't working, was the "old way", either in methodology, or implementation.
    You seem to think there's not a problem here, that ranking 30- something in the world is just fine, but I look at the numbers and I see an alarming gap. I believe that we are intellectually hobbling our youth. This is the greatest nation that has ever existed on the face of the Earth. Are we not smart enough to take a look at what the top five scoring nations are teaching and rip 'em off?
    Just what exactly is Singapore teaching? How are they teaching it?
     
  2. gigs

    gigs Member

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  3. m.e.

    m.e. Freelance Bio-exorcist Silver Supporting Member

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    Here’s an example:

    Prove that a^n + b^n ≠ c^n where n is an integer greater than 2.

    Also, write a story about it.
     
  4. NamaEnsou

    NamaEnsou Supporting Member

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    Please don't make assumptions about what I'm thinking when you can find out more accurately by simply asking. Your approach to the conversation is another thing wrong here, where we try to destroy people who say things we disagree with rather than looking for the truth together.

    We're in complete agreeance that this country is falling behind, but possibly not agreeing on the reasons or cures for it. If I'm correct, you're thinking that changing the method of instruction is the key to correcting the problem. I think the problem has more to do with mindset and cultural norms, where it's become not-cool to work on boring stuff when watching videos, texting, playing games and going to the mall is more fun.

    Nothing replaces hard work and a goal oriented learning mentality when progress is the desired result.
     
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  5. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Silver Supporting Member

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    I suspect that a part of the problem may be with the method of instruction, but not the method itself. I hate to say it, but a study is needed! It may already have been done but such things are not exactly fun reading at the beach, or on the rack at the airport bookstore.
    I really don't know if anyone has done an "autopsy" on the efficacy of teaching methods for the common core math.
    I agree with you- I think the problem or hurdles in overcoming cultural norms and mindset may be THE problem, no matter which methods are used to teach or which math method is being taught.
    We have a society that doesn't value academic achievement. We say we do, but what is the highest paid public employee in many states? It's a sports coach.
    If you have a large group of educators (or even a significant minority) who feel like the "new math" is just an annoying thing that they have to teach, and do so half-heartedly, with their goal of meeting the minimum requirements, and then teach the old methods on the side or after, is that contributing? Are educators on board and understand the mission and methods?
    If so, are those viewpoints leaking out into the public and sabotaging the greater mission?
    I've said before, one hurdle may simply be funding. We've starved our schools to the point where people don't want to send their kids there and would rather spend their money at a charter or private school, and the charters pull funding away from the standard public system. If the public school is underperforming because there's not funding, fund it!
    If it turns out we, as a society, just don't give enough of a damn, what then?

    There is the mindset of the parents and adult public at large, which you can see plenty of in this thread. Yeah, the old methods put us on the Moon and the other things, which is great, but to resist a change in education either vehemently or quite passively, rubs off on our children.
    What is the behavioral lesson for a kid, when dad, getting frustrated by not understanding new math, shows the child "the easy way.. that I don't know why they aren't teaching you"?
    The lesson learned is that what you're learning in math class is bull****.

    The problem is absolutely not as simple as "the new math sucks". The old math was suckin' too. This nation has the means to implement change on the education mechanics side, but is there the will, the drive, and the ability for the public to allow for a mulitilayered, complex, and introspective look at why these scores are low? Eh, my magic 8 ball says, "not today, mister!"
    These are polarizing times and it seems like people want a very, very simple scapegoat and a very simple "gut" answer. It ain't there, but again, that is probably what will be offered up, and IMO, why we'll still be talking about below average scores in another ten years.
     
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  6. TheGuildedAge

    TheGuildedAge Supporting Member

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    Except it’s not a fact.

    It’s a false narrative written by people with an agenda and repeated by people who believe and quote things they read without understanding it.
     
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  7. Timcito

    Timcito Member

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    I find this alarmingly narrow and naïve.
     
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  8. Timcito

    Timcito Member

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    Speaking as someone who works in higher and further education, I see an impulse to prioritize achievement over standards. In my (albeit limited) experience of US colleges, there seems to be a massive 'support system' designed to get students through courses and keep the success rate in the pink. It may look good on paper and satisfy the hugging, moist-eyed, fist-pumping spirit of America's Got Talent, but I guess there is a price to pay for all this remarkable achievement.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2019
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  9. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Silver Supporting Member

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    It energizes the base. Just go with it.
     
  10. edro

    edro Member

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    I taught the end product of K12 for a good many years.
    Courses that needed particular skills that SHOULD have been learned in K12....
    Pretty much qualified to call bulltish when I run across it...
     
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  11. Sobbincat

    Sobbincat Gold Supporting Member

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    Since I've always been a teacher let me say few things. Math education is a very complex undertaking that is handicapped by political processes where everyone is an expert. Most people have spent a good portion of their lives in a school. Certainly that qualifies them as a Master Teacher ready to be the Superintendent. People with no professional experience are always telling the professional teacher how the job should be done. Most people wouldn't know new math from old math and couldn't explain the difference between the common core and the Marine Corps. And it's clear that what they don't like about math education is related to what they don't understand in their kid's homework. And even if they do understand the math, they still might not be able to teach it. Teaching is an Art. There are some scientific aspects to it, but it's a craft, like musicianship. There are conventional standards and assessment is a vital part of it. But not everyone knows tone like Tag. You really have to be able to play more than Politician before you tell others how to rock.
     
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  12. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Silver Supporting Member

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    Uh huh. Enlighten me. Rosy assessments of the various international objective tests seem to be in very short supply. Have been for some time.
     
  13. Dickey

    Dickey Member

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    OH MAN that really pimmeeoff! I hate that **** & always mention it every time some women speaks to me like that.
     
  14. edro

    edro Member

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    *1E12!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Cue Paul Harvey right here!

    Yep. I was known for my 'redneck explanations'..... Students not in my classes regularly came to me stating 'so&so said I should come to you because I don't have a clue how this works. They said you had a redneck version of everything.'

    I could teach from different angles because I learned from profs that could simplify things from multiple angles using every day 'stuff' to illustrate a point. One of them would hit and they could understand it... Then it made sense to them... My physics prof in college (Auburn grad multiple hard science degrees w/ 4.0 across the board which is big time if one knows Auburn Univ) didn't teach traditionally either. He worked that board up front, made us work the board up front, came up with all kinds of scenarios to work through. Best was a long rope all the way across the amphitheater type classroom with two linemen size guys on each end. He put the smallest girl in the center of the rope with her little finger hooked around the rope. He told her to jerk with her finger as hard as she could with it. One finger, the pinkie toe finger.... If you've had physics, you should be able to envision how embarrassed the four big guys were right after she jerked. Then we did numbers, vectors, and such... Made sense.... THAT is teaching.

    Power Point should be banned from edu in my honest dumb redneck opinion. I didn't use it. I went through more dry erase markers than the rest in my building...

    I remember drawing a road on the board with gradual hills and having students describe cars one the road, both from a fixed observer's point and occupants in the car. I then made the hills less gradual deviations and discuss again. I talked about springs and shocks as far as holding in one's hand and trying to compress and extend at different rates and the felt difference by one doing the compressing/extending... They understood it easily..... Then asked how it applied to the course.

    I then held up an inductor and grinned.... They already understood the basics. When I explained it magnetically and calculations.... Like breeze... Much shorter total time and no looks like a hog looking at a wristwatch....

    Bunch of different ways to skin a cat.... Being a redneck helps...
     
  15. MrGretsch

    MrGretsch Member

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    "Common Core" is the most maligned, misunderstood and misrepresented Education reform to ever come down the pike. Really. It was put together by 48 State Governors of both parties in order to attempt to standardize education benchmarks across all 50 states. It is a damn shame that a few bad players managed to screw up yet another generation by demonizing modern education. People who grew up with "new math" were panicked when their kids were taught a different technique. Just like our parents and new math. The more things change, the more they stay the same.
     
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  16. TheGuildedAge

    TheGuildedAge Supporting Member

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    Before I enlighten you, I will provide three caveats:

    1. Public school teacher for 18 plus years

    2. There are MANY things wrong with education, but that's for another thread. Suffice it to say I am not blind to the profession and its faults. Special education is what is destroying it the most.

    3. Everything I say is related to how things are in Pennsylvania. I am not qualified to comment in how education is run in other states.

    Understand I have access to data you don't, so I am able to see tendencies and information the general public doesn't. For example, I can specifically tell you exactly what area of math or reading your child is deficient in. I am talking down to the specific skill, ie. your child had trouble with improper fractions or they struggled with the fluency portion of the language arts assessment.

    Fact 1: The standardized tests are not objective.They are neither reliable nor valid indicators of student success. I know this because I have seen them and have enough background in psychology to support this assertion.

    Fact 2: Standardized tests make money. Lots of money. The companies that make them and grade them have made millions of dollars in profit administering them. Any more would get political.

    Fact 3: America's rich kids do as well as anyone in any other country.

    Fact 3: Our poor do not.

    Fact 4: You aren't comparing apples to oranges. You aren't even comparing fruit. Special education in the US is so different from other countries. EVERYONE in PA takes the same test with no accommodations. Your IEP may say you get certain accommodations in my classroom, ie. shorter tests, less choices, etc. but you don't get them on the test. Further, kids in most other countries are tracked. To be blunt, dumb kids are sent elsewhere. In many of those countries, many kids can't even go to school. So you are comparing EVERY child here who takes the test vs. the elite from other countries. Our best do about the same as the best from other countries.



    I could go on and on but the main point is people who aren't in the system hear a talking point and repeat even though they have never set foot in a classroom.

    Most people don't really understand how education is administered. But what aggravates me is they read an article, think they are an expert, and then start regurgitating the talking points as facts.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2019
  17. Kenny Blue

    Kenny Blue Silver Supporting Member

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    Umm...What ? ?
     
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  18. MoonshineMan

    MoonshineMan Member

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    Muzactly
     
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  19. Glass Onion

    Glass Onion Toneful truth seeker. Gold Supporting Member

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    Examples are all over the place just google.

    I teach 5th grade math and get what they are trying to do but to have state test questions that can’t be answered using all available methods is just stupid.

    There are questions that you can’t get the answer for if you don’t know the new algorithm to work it.
    It is total bull ****. If you can work the problem with any algorithm and get the right answer you should get credit.

    Common core methods have become a travesty of education.
     
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  20. TheGuildedAge

    TheGuildedAge Supporting Member

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    I was just reading an editorial where two university professors said the whole math curriculum needs to be blown up.

    Most people never use Algebra, Algebra II, Trig, etc. and they argued our math should change to reflect the times.

    Current math curriculum was from the space race in the 50s/60s.

    Government wanted more rocket scientists.

    Not saying they are right, just interesting.
     
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