Can you perceive the "punch" of volume when mic'ed off-stage?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by the_rising, Mar 2, 2015.

  1. the_rising

    the_rising Silver Supporting Member

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    Just curious....

    Twin Reverb and Blues Jr both mic'ed offstage.

    Twin is running clean (but very loud) at 6 on the volume knob (but 85w through 2x12); Blues Jr is running at 4 on the volume knob to retain its clean tone (15w through 1x12).

    Both are isolated and mic'ed offstage and the FOH soundman has them coming through the house/PA at the same decibals.

    Can you hear/feel/sense the power/volume of the Twin through the PA? Basically that punch/hit/thump of pure volume? Or is the punch/hit/thump lost and it sounds similar to the Blues Jr in that regard (in terms of power/punch/thump)?
     
  2. Yer Blues

    Yer Blues Member

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    I'd guess it would depend on the size of the venue and how close you were to the stage. If you're in the back row of a 2,000 seat theater I don't think it will make a difference, however if you're 5 feet away in a 50 person bar you will be able to tell.
     
  3. Blue Strat

    Blue Strat Member

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    It could vary with FOH settings like compression and EQ. The best way to find out is to go out front. Work with the sound man if necessary.
     
  4. the_rising

    the_rising Silver Supporting Member

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    Zero stage/live volume....both amps entirely isolated offstage, mic'ed coming through the front-of-house PA.
     
  5. elijah

    elijah Member

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    In my experience the opposite is often true, if you are comparing the same amp set quietly or loud.
    I think it has to do with the way our ears hear differently at different volumes. A loud bassy tone may translate to less bass to the audience or vice versa.
    With 2 different amps it is very hard to determine what is affecting what.
     
  6. Yer Blues

    Yer Blues Member

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    Sorry to contribute to failures in reading comprehension...:beer
     
  7. swiveltung

    swiveltung Member

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    My guess is no you cant. I use a wireless rig a lot and the sound out front compared with standing in front of your amp is...well .......depressing!
     
  8. ledzep618

    ledzep618 Supporting Member

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    No, you won't be able to tell a difference beyond the fact that a Twin sounds different than a Blues Jr. They'll probably sound equally big through the PA. Maybe subtle differences in the low end but I doubt it'll be anything to write home about.

    Big amps are awesome if it's your thing, and if stage volume is a component of your sound and feel. If you're playing completely isolated and relying totally on IEMs and the PA, then a 1 watt amp will do the trick.
     
  9. Heady Jam Fan

    Heady Jam Fan Member

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    This is my thought as well, for the most part. Though louder volume can affect how the speakers are performing and even the mic as well. The Twin will have more punch in the bass - sort of percussive and piano-like. The Blues Jr. might have a bit more zip in the mids.
     
  10. SecondFloorTones

    SecondFloorTones Member

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    Our ears are notoriously rubbish when it comes to comparing apples to apples at different volumes. If you're going to compare at different volumes, they're not comparable - pure and simple. Finding the differences between sounds independently of volume differences is a fallacy. If the volumes are different, the sounds are different, and you can't factor that out of the equation as far as our ears are concerned. Two identical Fender Twins (in an ideal setup) - one on three, the other on six- is just that - different.
     
  11. Fishyfishfish

    Fishyfishfish Member

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    I can't feel anything when amp is offstage and I am using IEM's. It takes about two songs before my ears start "settling" into the mix.
     
  12. TheoDog

    TheoDog Silver Supporting Member

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    To me, I don't listen for "punch" per se, but for the sound of the guitar filling the venue. Since that phenomenon will add its own reverb depending on the size of the venue, "punch" doesn't quite equate.
    I love using a little amp mic'd in a big room and hearing it the way I "feel" it.
    But in all the situations, my guitar sound is part of an entire ensemble.
     
  13. bigtone23

    bigtone23 Member

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    If you can't hear the amp's sound offstage, you will really only hear the sonic template of the amps themselves via the mic used. A Twin doesn't sound like a Blues Jr. The 2x12" 100w punch won't really translate as much as the scoopy tonality of a Twin vs the more midrange pop of the BJ. Think of the PA like a modeling amp: the speaker and power amp stay the same, but the sonic signature/character of the different amps change.
    Recording does the same thing, a Champ holds it's own next to a Marshall stack in the mix.
     

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