Capo Question

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by airpatrick, Jan 3, 2008.


  1. airpatrick

    airpatrick Member

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    I am an acoustic player and just got my first electric. I use a basic kyser quick change capo on my acoustic, and I want to know if this will work well with my electric or if I need an "electric capo," such as the Kyser electric guitar capo.

    Thanks for your help. I'm recoring a song with multiple tracks and I'm playing all the tracks. Instead of singing, I'm playing the vocals on the electric and I need a capo for this.
     
  2. jezzzz2003

    jezzzz2003 Member

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    Theyre both curved so yes this will work
     
  3. jbgordon

    jbgordon Member

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    I personally use a Shubb capo for acoustic and electric because you can adjust the tension so that it doesn't pull your guitar sharp.
     
  4. royd

    royd Member

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    turn the pad on the back of the neck around to lessen the tension and if your string gauge isn't too small and your action isn't too high and your frets aren't too big and you get the capo close to the fret... it should work OK.

    as I'm hinting, it is more difficult to keep a capo from causing the strings to go sharp on an electric.
     
  5. utterhack

    utterhack Gold Supporting Member

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    +1

    I'd grab one of these (Planet Waves NS Capo) for fifteen bucks. Don't be fooled by the price - it's brilliant, esp. for electric.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    I use several Kysers and to be honest I've never paid attention to the acoustic and electric difference since my electrics don't have a small fingerboard radius. They all work fine on all my guitars.

    And they do NOT pull your guitar out of tune if you put them on properly, whatever type of guitar it is. This is the biggest myth regarding capos there is. Fret size and action height are also irrelevant if it's fitted correctly, although very light strings may be slightly more affected. (This applies to all capos, not just Kysers.)
     
  7. jzguitar

    jzguitar Member

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    Sorry - Kysers WILL tend to pull you sharp. I've used Shubbs on my electrics for years with great results. Adjust the tension to equal your normal finger pressure and you should be in good shape.
     
  8. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    Sorry, you are wrong.

    Mine don't.

    At all.
     
  9. greatbigz

    greatbigz Member

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    I use this one:
    [​IMG]

    It's $40.00 but I love it.
     
  10. jbgordon

    jbgordon Member

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    I'm still going to have to agree with my previous statement and this one. I guess you could say I'm a "proficient" capo user, leading worship and having to change keys a lot. In my experience, Kysers do pull my electrics sharp.

    I'm not trying to start a fight, I'm just being as honest as I can be.
     
  11. pipedwho

    pipedwho Member

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    The electric ones also have a much lower spring tension. This helps dramatically with keeping the guitar from going sharp.

    You can put the capo almost on top of the fret to reduce the string pull problem, but the regular acoustic Kyser has so much string tension that it WILL still pull your strings sharp. This may not be a problem if you don't play with other instruments, but I left my electric capo at home once, and I can tell you now that the organist that I play with wouldn't stop complaining when I used my acoustic Kyser on my electric. (And this was with the capo almost right on top of the fret to minimise the problem - which brings with it a slight playability issue because my hand bumps into it when it's that close.)

    I now have a Planet Waves dual action capo with adjustable spring tension that I love. I also have a Shubb and a G7th that are great, but I can't clip them to the headstock - which is a bit of a PITA, so I primarily use these at home, or when recording.
     
  12. nrvana8775

    nrvana8775 Member

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    I found those doing a google search, I'm interested to try them out. I use a capo on a different fret for nearly every song. The dunlop one I have doesn't really seem to like my 11's and wide radius[​IMG]
     
  13. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    So am I.

    I use the Kyser, and it doesn't pull my guitars sharp. Period.

    So there is nothing wrong with the capo.


    All the modern capos that I've tried work well if used correctly. However, for some reason the Kyser alone is constantly bashed and rubbished.

    The only possible explanation - since it works perfectly for me, and I mean absolutely perfectly, I never have to re-tune when using it on any of my electric or acoustic guitars, including 12-strings - is that the people who have problems with it just aren't using it correctly.

    No offense intended, but there is no other possibility.

    I'm not saying other capos are no good, at all - personally I find them all more fiddly, slower and less convenient than the Kyser, but they all work equally well once you learn how to, and if their particular characteristics are easier for you to accommodate, that's great.

    So why is it that people who have different favorites can't stop putting down the Kyser? It's a very popular product that works well for most of the players who use it (including many pros, you will see it on a lot of stages and TV shows), so isn't it about time that those who don't get on with it stopped blaming the tool?
     
  14. jzguitar

    jzguitar Member

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    I know - instead of spending a whole post telling all of us that we use our capos incorrectly you enlighten us with the proper method?
     
  15. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    I have done, many times.

    But here it is again:

    Put the capo on with the front edge of the rubber pad exactly along the back edge of the fret crown. Not on the fret crown, and not any further from the fret. If you look at it sideways, the string should pass from on the fret to under the rubber at the same point. You also need to practice getting it on in one smooth movement so you don't push the strings sideways, but that's easier than it sounds.

    Yes, this puts it very close to the fret, and some people won't like this because it might get in the way. Fair enough... probably the Kyser is not the best capo for you.


    BTW, I'm not saying that the Kyser is the best capo for everyone, that everyone should use it, or that others are no good - just that every time a thread on capos comes up, one or more people post that the Kyser is no good because it pulls the strings sharp, it grips the guitar too hard (or even that it damages the frets, which I've seen posted). No other capo seems to get bashed wrongly like this, and it just puzzles me why there is so much hatred for it alone.

    I like it because all the other types are more fiddly and require either two hands or at the very least to mess about with tensioning it until it's 'right'. The great beauty of the Kyser is that it avoids all that by using a simple spring which is always right, since it's self-adjusting. It's not 'too strong' either - if the grip strength of the capo is that critical, you've got it too far from the fret... you shouldn't need to have to get it 'just right'.

    (FWIW, I don't even like the Dunlop Trigger as much because the angle of the levers is more awkward, for me.)
     
  16. lxm

    lxm Member

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    thanks for the GAS :mad: :)
     
  17. Lolaviola

    Lolaviola Supporting Member

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    I just got a Kyser (acoustic) and it seems to work fine on electric.
     
  18. pipedwho

    pipedwho Member

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    The Kyser comes in TWO spring tensions. One is for acoustics and grips like a mongrel. The other is for electrics and has a much softer spring.

    The main reason people complain is because they are using the ACOUSTIC CAPO (ie. super strong spring) on their ELECTRIC GUITARS. And even with the method that John has described above, this is way too much pressure to be putting on the low tension strings of an electric guitar. Not because it is going to damage the frets, but because it will pull the guitar sharp, and in extreme cases, out of tune with itself.

    This is exacerbated for people that use thin strings, for people that capo on or above the fourth fret, and for people that need to accompany other instruments. If you use thick strings and play by yourself, you may never even notice that there is a problem.
     
  19. the_Chris

    the_Chris It's All Been Done Before Gold Supporting Member

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    You know what John, I've never been completely happy with the Kyser Quick Change capo until I tried your method of putting it literally to the back edge of the fret and I've got nothing other to say than.... it works - thanks!

    For about as long as I can remember, I've always ended up with using the Dunlop Trigger Capo because it was easier to just throw on and use. I do really like how in tune I am with this Kyser right now, so I'm going to try to do it this way from now on. FWIW, I think you're onto something!

    This sounds completely ridiculous to some people I'm sure, but if you're having trouble with it pulling sharp, do try putting it along the back edge of the fret - it does make a difference as I'm finding right now.
     
  20. betterdays

    betterdays Member

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    Another trick i've found, stole it from David Crowder actually, is to put the capo on upside down, so the part closest to the spring is closer to your high e string.
     

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