Carlos Santana Explains Why He Left Gibson for PRS Guitars, Believes He Saved the Company With Advice He Gave Paul Reed Smith

slider

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Interesting. Carlos was surprisingly coherent, for someone who has been in contact with an angel named Metatron since 1994. Really, you can look it up. Great player, unique human being.
In the article Carlos mentions Albert King sitting in with the Doors. It's on Youtube, also interesting.
 

Shovelhead

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I know that Howard Leese and Santana were among the first few guitars ever played from PRS. But for Santana to say that he saved the company might be a stretch...

My own personal preference on Santana's sounds was his SG. He sounded perfect at Woodstock. Much more to my liking than his current setup. But of course, that's all just opinion anyway.
 

Betos

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I know that Howard Leese and Santana were among the first few guitars ever played from PRS. But for Santana to say that he saved the company might be a stretch...

My own personal preference on Santana's sounds was his SG. He sounded perfect at Woodstock. Much more to my liking than his current setup. But of course, that's all just opinion anyway.
as mentioned in the interview, Santana was a huge advocate for student editions; the first SE was a Santana. The SE line definitely helped out the business
 

Squarehammer

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Hello and I sincerely hope you are all healthy.

View attachment 277519

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I'm somewhat confused about this. First that's a pic of Santana from Woodstock. Second Santana stopped using Gibson and started using the Yamaha SG-175 which he helped design around 1975 till around 1982 when he switched to PRS.

https://www.ultimatesantana.com/gear-tone/yamaha-sg/yamaha-and-carlossantana/

https://www.groundguitar.com/carlos-santana-guitars-and-gear/

So Santana is confused (old age maybe?) He left Yamaha for PRS.
 

Haruki

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493
I'm somewhat confused about this. First that's a pic of Santana from Woodstock. Second Santana stopped using Gibson and started using the Yamaha SG-175 which he helped design around 1975 till around 1982 when he switched to PRS.

https://www.ultimatesantana.com/gear-tone/yamaha-sg/yamaha-and-carlossantana/

https://www.groundguitar.com/carlos-santana-guitars-and-gear/

So Santana is confused (old age maybe?) He left Yamaha for PRS.
Interesting; I wish I knew. I almost forgot about his Yamaha years.

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AaeCee

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All I know is that I've always liked Santana's fat yet clear tones regardless of which guitar he was playing, and those I've heard since he's been playing his sig. PRS model seem especially thick and clear. The 'all in the fingers' argument certainly seems to apply here, but there's no doubt he's playing through some quality equipment that matches his style well.
 

Haruki

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493
I like this:

"I said, 'Paul, look, when I started, they used to have the Gibson Junior, they called it the student model.'

"I said, 'Why don't you make student models, man? A lot of people cannot afford - people in junior high school, in high school - they can't afford the guitars that you make for me, so make one for kids who go to junior high school and high school.'

"And he kept looking at me like I was crazy, and so after about literally almost like 20-25 years, he finally listened to me. I'm not exaggerating, I pretty much believe this saved his company, you know, because, the youngsters...
 

Guitarworks

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I didn't know PRS needed saving.

I understand Santana's logic on the student model. But all the same, no kid aspires to have that. No kid wants to be playing the guitar that the market might label as being a 'fisher-price kiddie guitar'. Kids aspire to be good enough to one day be worthy of the expensive flagship model and they won't settle for the student model until they get there.
 

gpu

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But all the same, no kid aspires to have that. No kid wants to be playing the guitar that the market might label as being a 'fisher-price kiddie guitar'. Kids aspire to be good enough to one day be worthy of the expensive flagship model and they won't settle for the student model until they get there.
Kids don't buy guitars, parents buy guitars.

And parents have to worry that their kids might be going through a phase with a new expensive hobby right round the corner.

For all they know their kid might end up preferring basket weaving as a hobby.

Entry level guitars sell well for good reason.
 




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