CCR Before you accuse me

antvas1963

Member
Messages
473
i’m having trouble getting the cord progression that starts at one minute 20 seconds. I think the outro has the same progression but there is a chord in there I can’t seem to identify. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

RLD

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,855
@1:20
4 measures of E7
2 of A7
2 of E7
1 of B7
1 of A7
1 of E7
turnaround E7 to B7
 

stevel

Member
Messages
14,624
I think what might be tripping you up is maybe you don't know all the subtle variations of 12 bar blues progressions very well.

A "straight ahead" 12 Bar is a progression like RLD gives (maybe without even the turnaround).

The body of this song uses something often called the "quick change".

12 bar forms are best understood as 3 lines of 4 chords.

I - I - I - I

IV - IV - I - I

V - V - I - I

This is what I call the "skeletal" form. Other forms are mostly variations of this. "Johhny B. Goode" is an example of this form (that's right boys and girls, it does NOT go to IV in the last line, so please stop doing it when it's called at a gig! and there's no turnaround either!)

Notice that each line begins with "2" I, IV, and V chords, and ends with 2 I chords (the first line is obvioulsly all I chords but you can divide it into 2 groups of 2 so it matches what's happening with the other lines).

Now ordinarily, we just assume that each chord is a 7th chord - I7, IV7, V7 and in this key, E7, A7, and B7 as RLD says.

But sometimes the I chord may not be a I7 and be a I6 instead, or things like that. More on this in a minute.

One of the more common variations is to use IV in the 2nd measure of the last line:

I - I - I - I

IV - IV - I - I

V - IV - I - I

Then the Quick Change adds IV in the first line in the same place:

I - IV - I - I

IV - IV - I - I

V - IV - I - I

Notice now each line begins with I, IV, and V respectively, but ends with IV-I-I.

Of course a turnaround can be added as well giving you (in any of the forms):

I - IV - I - I

IV - IV - I - I

V - IV - I - [I-V]

Here I put the I-V in brackets to imply they happen in a single measure as they often do it this way - with I on beats 1 and 2 and V on beat 3 and 4, or even on only beat 4, though we usually just put "V" for the last 4 beat chord to show a turnaround. That's what RLD's E7 - B7 turnaround means.

Writers mix and match these forms anyway they please. There are actually versions that start IV - IV - I - I.

Now, what may be tripping you up in this song is when you get to 1:20, they use a different form:

I - I - I - I7

IV - IV - I - I

V - IV- I - [I-V]

Which is the older "Jazz" form, where really the I chord is often I6 and the last chord of the first line has a CHANGE to I7 - and that I7 chord behaves like the V7 of the key of the IV chord, so here it's like E7 is actually the V7 chord of the key of A - which is what the IV chord is in E.

We call that a "V7/IV" (five-seven of four) and it gives more "push" towards the IV chord on the 2nd line (not unlike how the turnaround gives more push back to the beginning) and the effect is heightened when the first 3 chords are not already I7 and something like I6 which is common in Big Band stuff for example.

However, he actually still plays I7 - E7 - for all those chords, but changes the voicing on the last chord so it's higher - which is the same principle - emphasizing the last chord - even though in this case they all just stay I7.

So what you have is NO quick change in this pass, and the "emphasized last chord of the line" in the same way the Jazz form does, but just with only the I7 chord.

So you do have, as RLD put, but I'll lay it out like I've been laying it out:

I7 - I7 - I7 - I7

IV7 - IV7 - I7 - I7

V7 - IV7 - I7 - [I7 - V7]

With that last I7 of the first line being voiced differently.

Basically he plays:

E - 4
B - 3
G - 4
D - x
A - x
E - x

But really emphasizes the 2nd and 3rd strings - I can barely hear the first string in there but it does sound like it's in the lead part and not the rhythm guitar.

He plays it for a measure and then lays out for measure 2 - but the rhythm doesn't change to the IV7 like the Quick Change and just stays on I7 (and he's resting after the first beat). Then that repeats but on the 4th measure he goes up the neck higher it sounds like to me:

E - 7
B - 9
G - 7
D - 9
A - x
E - x

Same notes, higher up the neck, but on a lower set of strings so now there's a higher note included, and that is what gives it that "push".

Again the higher notes seem quieter than the lower two notes (which are common things to play - even for him - he uses it a lot - it's the intro to something like "Green River".)

So I may not have the voicings exact - he may be playing it all up the neck and just not hitting the higher strings until the 4th measure, but the point I'm trying to make is about this change in the voicing that gives it more push to the next line.

So what makes this pass seem different is that the 2nd chord is NOT the IV7 as it has been throughout so far, and the 4th chord of the first line is an "emphasized" version of what's been going on - a higher voicing.

Hope that helps.
 

antvas1963

Member
Messages
473
I think what might be tripping you up is maybe you don't know all the subtle variations of 12 bar blues progressions very well.

A "straight ahead" 12 Bar is a progression like RLD gives (maybe without even the turnaround).

The body of this song uses something often called the "quick change".

12 bar forms are best understood as 3 lines of 4 chords.

I - I - I - I

IV - IV - I - I

V - V - I - I

This is what I call the "skeletal" form. Other forms are mostly variations of this. "Johhny B. Goode" is an example of this form (that's right boys and girls, it does NOT go to IV in the last line, so please stop doing it when it's called at a gig! and there's no turnaround either!)

Notice that each line begins with "2" I, IV, and V chords, and ends with 2 I chords (the first line is obvioulsly all I chords but you can divide it into 2 groups of 2 so it matches what's happening with the other lines).

Now ordinarily, we just assume that each chord is a 7th chord - I7, IV7, V7 and in this key, E7, A7, and B7 as RLD says.

But sometimes the I chord may not be a I7 and be a I6 instead, or things like that. More on this in a minute.

One of the more common variations is to use IV in the 2nd measure of the last line:

I - I - I - I

IV - IV - I - I

V - IV - I - I

Then the Quick Change adds IV in the first line in the same place:

I - IV - I - I

IV - IV - I - I

V - IV - I - I

Notice now each line begins with I, IV, and V respectively, but ends with IV-I-I.

Of course a turnaround can be added as well giving you (in any of the forms):

I - IV - I - I

IV - IV - I - I

V - IV - I - [I-V]

Here I put the I-V in brackets to imply they happen in a single measure as they often do it this way - with I on beats 1 and 2 and V on beat 3 and 4, or even on only beat 4, though we usually just put "V" for the last 4 beat chord to show a turnaround. That's what RLD's E7 - B7 turnaround means.

Writers mix and match these forms anyway they please. There are actually versions that start IV - IV - I - I.

Now, what may be tripping you up in this song is when you get to 1:20, they use a different form:

I - I - I - I7

IV - IV - I - I

V - IV- I - [I-V]

Which is the older "Jazz" form, where really the I chord is often I6 and the last chord of the first line has a CHANGE to I7 - and that I7 chord behaves like the V7 of the key of the IV chord, so here it's like E7 is actually the V7 chord of the key of A - which is what the IV chord is in E.

We call that a "V7/IV" (five-seven of four) and it gives more "push" towards the IV chord on the 2nd line (not unlike how the turnaround gives more push back to the beginning) and the effect is heightened when the first 3 chords are not already I7 and something like I6 which is common in Big Band stuff for example.

However, he actually still plays I7 - E7 - for all those chords, but changes the voicing on the last chord so it's higher - which is the same principle - emphasizing the last chord - even though in this case they all just stay I7.

So what you have is NO quick change in this pass, and the "emphasized last chord of the line" in the same way the Jazz form does, but just with only the I7 chord.

So you do have, as RLD put, but I'll lay it out like I've been laying it out:

I7 - I7 - I7 - I7

IV7 - IV7 - I7 - I7

V7 - IV7 - I7 - [I7 - V7]

With that last I7 of the first line being voiced differently.

Basically he plays:

E - 4
B - 3
G - 4
D - x
A - x
E - x

But really emphasizes the 2nd and 3rd strings - I can barely hear the first string in there but it does sound like it's in the lead part and not the rhythm guitar.

He plays it for a measure and then lays out for measure 2 - but the rhythm doesn't change to the IV7 like the Quick Change and just stays on I7 (and he's resting after the first beat). Then that repeats but on the 4th measure he goes up the neck higher it sounds like to me:

E - 7
B - 9
G - 7
D - 9
A - x
E - x

Same notes, higher up the neck, but on a lower set of strings so now there's a higher note included, and that is what gives it that "push".

Again the higher notes seem quieter than the lower two notes (which are common things to play - even for him - he uses it a lot - it's the intro to something like "Green River".)

So I may not have the voicings exact - he may be playing it all up the neck and just not hitting the higher strings until the 4th measure, but the point I'm trying to make is about this change in the voicing that gives it more push to the next line.

So what makes this pass seem different is that the 2nd chord is NOT the IV7 as it has been throughout so far, and the 4th chord of the first line is an "emphasized" version of what's been going on - a higher voicing.

Hope that helps.
Thanks for the reply. I am going to copy this down so I can study it. I will need some time to understand it. I do appreciate the explanation.
 




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