Certain Solos note for note

Motterpaul

Tone is in the Ears
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I just decided to learn the original "Smoke on the Water" Guitar solo (at 3:00). It's mostly in Aeolian (natural minor), but with a few blue notes thrown in on the faster parts.

It feels like an atypical pattern compared to more contemporary solos I have memorized, which are mostly Dorian. Kind of like learning a chess opening from a century ago.

 

JosephZ

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Nice! That’s a good one to play note for note. It was one of the few i transcribed “note for note” as a teenager. Now I’m sure my version was not exactly note for but note probably still pretty close ish. I don’t know if I remember it even, but I’m half tempted to try to remember it the best I can just so I can compare to the correct version in the video and see how close a 17 yo me got.
 

Motterpaul

Tone is in the Ears
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Nice! That’s a good one to play note for note. It was one of the few i transcribed “note for note” as a teenager. Now I’m sure my version was not exactly note for but note probably still pretty close ish. I don’t know if I remember it even, but I’m half tempted to try to remember it the best I can just so I can compare to the correct version in the video and see how close a 17 yo me got.

I found it interesting that it uses patterns that maybe Blackmore learned by himself or back when there was a slightly different school of rock. Minor songs these days are much more likely to be Dorian (M6) than natural minor (b6) in my experience. But back then actual lead guitar solos were often just rough patches of fast chicken scratches over a basic pentatonic scale. Not many mid-60s guitarists really tried to compose a solo. That was part of what made Jimmy Page and Blackmore so respected in their day. They took lead guitar to a new level of musical seriousness.
 

Tag

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I just decided to learn the original "Smoke on the Water" Guitar solo (at 3:00). It's mostly in Aeolian (natural minor), but with a few blue notes thrown in on the faster parts.

It feels like an atypical pattern compared to more contemporary solos I have memorized, which are mostly Dorian. Kind of like learning a chess opening from a century ago.



Frigging amazing solo. The phrasing is phenomenal. The most over looked monster guitar player in rock. That solo is as good as anything Clapton ever did, and it's not close to his best. Blackmore is a phenomenal guitarist.
Want a challenge?? Learn his solo to "Kentucky Woman" and watch how he makes the changes. KILLER. The fun starts at 1:45.
I had to learn that for a band I was in 40 years ago. It kicked me arse!!

 

Tone_Terrific

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i’ve been working on it as well. Found this helpful in capturing Blackmore’s articulation:

None of the live version I have heard are as good as the orig.
This (orig) version highlights some of the Blackmore-isms that are so appealing.
BTW - with a bit of effort it's possible to squeeze this solo, or parts, into various other songs.:dude
 

jjaaam

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1,889
On a broader scope, some solos pretty much demand note-for-note interpretation. Could you imagine the solo to Detroit Rock City being played differently? Hotel California?

Iconic solos deserve iconic treatment. Others can be improvised. That’s basically my mantra for my cover band, LOL
 

phillybri

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On a broader scope, some solos pretty much demand note-for-note interpretation. Could you imagine the solo to Detroit Rock City being played differently? Hotel California?

Iconic solos deserve iconic treatment. Others can be improvised. That’s basically my mantra for my cover band, LOL
Right there with you. Some solos (looking at you, Sweet Child o' Mine) need to be played the right way...
 

Motterpaul

Tone is in the Ears
Silver Supporting Member
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14,006
Frigging amazing solo. The phrasing is phenomenal. The most over looked monster guitar player in rock. That solo is as good as anything Clapton ever did, and it's not close to his best. Blackmore is a phenomenal guitarist.
Want a challenge?? Learn his solo to "Kentucky Woman" and watch how he makes the changes. KILLER. The fun starts at 1:45.
I had to learn that for a band I was in 40 years ago. It kicked me arse!!



That is a great Blackmore solo. It is like all the notes we know are there, but the context is a little mind-blowing.

This is one song that Joe Bonna covered... (guitar starts at 1:40)

 

Motterpaul

Tone is in the Ears
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I just joined a band with a Hammond and it's notable that he tends to go to natural minor blues progressions first - which is a lot of Blackmore also does. Typically I-minor, IV-minor, mVI, and V-minor.
 

Manny Scott

Member
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1,046
Frigging amazing solo. The phrasing is phenomenal. The most over looked monster guitar player in rock. That solo is as good as anything Clapton ever did, and it's not close to his best. Blackmore is a phenomenal guitarist.
Want a challenge?? Learn his solo to "Kentucky Woman" and watch how he makes the changes. KILLER. The fun starts at 1:45.
I had to learn that for a band I was in 40 years ago. It kicked me arse!!



Blackmore was way better than Clapton…..not even close….
 

Manny Scott

Member
Messages
1,046
On a broader scope, some solos pretty much demand note-for-note interpretation. Could you imagine the solo to Detroit Rock City being played differently? Hotel California?

Iconic solos deserve iconic treatment. Others can be improvised. That’s basically my mantra for my cover band, LOL

Absolutely agree….some solos are just as iconic as the song…..
 

fenderlead

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5,053
Not quite right but pretty close to the studio version.

It shows some Blackmoreisms.

Ritchie tends to play it differently in other (live) versions, which he did with other songs as well.

 
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Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
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46,945
Not quite right but pretty close to the studio version.

It shows some Blackmoreisms.

Ritchie tends to play it differently in other (live) versions, which he did with other songs as well.



Blackmore always improvised!
:beer
 




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