Chandler Tube Driver / clones smaller enclosures ?

klbabcock11

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
306
Looking for that tube driver sound just don't want that big of a pedals any alternatives? I think hermida is coming out with one.
 

S. F. Sorrow

Member
Messages
8,259
If it's running full voltage, they will be big. Just the nature of them.
It's important to my sound so size doesn't matter.
And tube pedals that you have to take apart to get to the tube isn't as fun as an easy access model. I'm a tube roller.
 

cj_wattage

Member
Messages
6,709
If it's running full voltage, they will be big. Just the nature of them.
Pretty much. You need room for a small transformer, the tube, and some space for air flow/heat dissipation.

That Moer thing looks neat, but it's getting it's higher voltages from a 15V DC supply and I'm guessing also probably a charge pump to double (or more) the incoming voltage. Not really the same beast as the Chandler.

The Lovepeda/Hermida thing also looks neat. But with a 10mA current draw, there ain't no tube in there. ;)
 

UncleLarry

Member
Messages
2,242
Pretty much. You need room for a small transformer, the tube, and some space for air flow/heat dissipation.

That Moer thing looks neat, but it's getting it's higher voltages from a 15V DC supply and I'm guessing also probably a charge pump to double (or more) the incoming voltage. Not really the same beast as the Chandler.

The Lovepeda/Hermida thing also looks neat. But with a 10mA current draw, there ain't no tube in there. ;)
Both the Chandler and B.K. Butler Tube Drivers are starved plate designs. They are not high voltage. The tube operates at about 15 volts and basically takes the place of clipping diodes in the circuit. The only reason they are big is because the power supply is built inside. Later reissue units used wall warts but still kept the same box design which is mostly empty.

I don't own one, but I have a hunch that the Moer is a Chinese copy of the Butler design. :)
 

cj_wattage

Member
Messages
6,709
Both the Chandler and B.K. Butler Tube Drivers are starved plate designs. They are not high voltage. The tube operates at about 15 volts
Yep, you're right. My mistake.

and basically takes the place of clipping diodes in the circuit.
Eh, not so much. If the below schematic is correct (and I believe that is ), the triodes are used as fairly standard common cathode gain stages, albeit with vanishingly low headroom owing to the low voltage (as you pointed out).




I don't own one, but I have a hunch that the Moer is a Chinese copy of the Butler design. :)
It may well be. With a 9v supply, a charge pump, and a voltage regulator, you could get +15v pretty easily. I stand corrected. :)
 

BoiceBox

Member
Messages
363
It is not an identical pedal, but you might try a Butler designed Real Tube. The enclosure is much smaller (with top jacks) and it does not use a wall wart, though it does require AC. I compared mine to a recent Tube Driver and thought it sounded great with my rig (Strat, Carr Rambler or Bassman). The mid control is a nice addition to the pedal.

 

UncleLarry

Member
Messages
2,242
Eh, not so much. If the below schematic is correct (and I believe that is ), the triodes are used as fairly standard common cathode gain stages, albeit with vanishingly low headroom owing to the low voltage (as you pointed out).

Hmm.......I stand corrected. :)

The tube is actually being driven by the opamp. There's not much gain from the tube because of the low voltage. The opamp supplies the level that the tube needs to drive it into distortion and provide sufficient output to the guitar amp. There is also some clipping from the the opamp at high gain levels but it is blended into the tube distortion.

I'm a fan of these types of pedals and I like their sound. I have a Maxon ROD880 on my board and it's my main drive. It's similar to the old TK999 Ibanez Tube King except that it has an added diode clipping stage and a boost circuit. Great sounding pedal and under the radar of TGP. :)
 

$tratcat

Member
Messages
1,670
It is not an identical pedal, but you might try a Butler designed Real Tube. The enclosure is much smaller (with top jacks) and it does not use a wall wart, though it does require AC. I compared mine to a recent Tube Driver and thought it sounded great with my rig (Strat, Carr Rambler or Bassman). The mid control is a nice addition to the pedal.

I have the gold-box version of this pedal and although I like the sound of it, it's not true bypass, fairly noisy and the footswitch is dodgy. Is anyone aware of mods for these pedals? The distortion is a nice, fat compressed quality, but I can't deal with the added noise and impact to the bypassed signal.
 

BoiceBox

Member
Messages
363
I have the gold-box version of this pedal and although I like the sound of it, it's not true bypass, fairly noisy and the footswitch is dodgy. Is anyone aware of mods for these pedals? The distortion is a nice, fat compressed quality, but I can't deal with the added noise and impact to the bypassed signal.
Mine has some added noise for sure, but no more than the modern Tube Driver I tried. The footswitch has worked consistently, though the pots were in terrible shape when I got it (well used). Some cleaner/lubricant has helped tremendously. I almost use a dedicated buffer as the first thing in pedal chain, and with the buffer on I don't notice any audible change in tone using the Real Tube in bypass. I don't specifically remember trying it without a buffer.
 

direneed

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
728
Noise has always been my main issue with the Tube Driver, but it is what it is. I have the most recent model, maybe 2-3 yrs old. I have seen some of the newer ones with external transformers in-line (not wall warts) to supposedly help reduce some noise. And we all know about the block o' wood on someone's pedalboard. I presume, and may have read, that was to help reduce some hum from the TD. Still a bad ass pedal and not one I'll get rid of even if it is only seldom used.
 

Rumble

Instrumental Rocker
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,517
Noise has always been my main issue with the Tube Driver, but it is what it is. I have the most recent model, maybe 2-3 yrs old. I have seen some of the newer ones with external transformers in-line (not wall warts) to supposedly help reduce some noise. And we all know about the block o' wood on someone's pedalboard. I presume, and may have read, that was to help reduce some hum from the TD. Still a bad ass pedal and not one I'll get rid of even if it is only seldom used.
From what I read recently, Johnson uses that "block o' wood" because he has a bad back. The block of wood helps with him reaching the pedal for adjustments. Cheaper than a chiropractor I guess.
 

wildschwein

Member
Messages
4,022
It may well be. With a 9v supply, a charge pump, and a voltage regulator, you could get +15v pretty easily.
Actually the Moen ships with a 15v adapter. I haven't tried one but I'm guessing that it is a pretty close copy of some model of the BK design, or maybe an amalgam of different models. There was a Tube Works issue of the BK that had just the one tone knob but only ran on a 9v adapter - this is the one used by Andy Timmons. Size and price are tempting with the Moen (compared to BK and Chandler models [=crazy $$$$$$]) and I've been pretty happy with previous Moen purchases (Shaky Jimi vibe, Buffalo DI/EQ and Pretty Dolly delay).

Not to hijack thread but as EJ has been mentioned, I seem to recall that EJ basically runs all his eqs on the lowest setting on his Tube Driver and pretty much just sets the pedal for unity in front of his lead Marshall. It's just used to smooth things out and add additional sustain for his violin tone - not really being used to produce monster gain or a radical eq boost - it's probably attenuating some frequencies more than boosting.
 




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