Charlie Parker & the Omnibook

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by jackaroo, Feb 5, 2006.


  1. jackaroo

    jackaroo Member

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    Looking for a copy of bird's solos transcribed for guitar w/ tab. Even better...an online or CDrom/DVD with the lines as midi so I can slow them down and play along and slowly increase tempo. Anyone know of anything like this - or where to look?

    thanks,

    J
     
  2. JimmyD

    JimmyD Member

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    Haven't seen anything related on line to Bird and guitar. There is a book that has 50 bebop heads arranged for the guitar. You could probably google that. I'll give you a line on a great set of books though. David Baker Volumes 1,2 and 3 are fantastic for learning the language of bebop. Run, do not walk and grab those exceptional study aids.
     
  3. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    +1, great books!

    As to yardbird, there are a couple books I've seen off the top of my head. One is "Charlie Parker for Guitar" by Mark Voelpel, and the other is a Mel Bay joint called "Essential Jazz Lines in the Style of Charlie Parker". The first one seems a little better, both have tab. I don't think either are as good as the omnibook, nor are they as good as taking a slowdowner app and playing along with Bird, since those books (omnibook included) won't show you exactly how he phrased the notes on the paper. And though his lines are worth studying unto themselves, the phrasing is a whole 'nother world of schooling.

    Good luck either way,

    Dave
     
  4. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

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    Probably currently out of print, but the best collective of classic bop lines that I've found is the
    "Bebop Bible", by Les Wise.

    Sorry for the potential hijack, but JimmyD, are you by any chance from Philadelphia?
     
  5. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    I remember that book! Yeah, it's hard to find now. Les is a great teacher. Very inspiring approach. You'd always walk out of his classes pumped up and ready to take anything on. I remember liking his book "Inner Jazz" but that's another one that's hard to find now.

    Anyway, he's got a couple other similar books in production, one of which is "Bebop licks for guitar". Book (with tab) + CD. It's not bad.
     
  6. JimmyD

    JimmyD Member

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    Actually I live about 50 miles away from Philly in Reading!

    Jim
     
  7. neve1073

    neve1073 Member

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    the omnibook is great.
    even greater is software or a machine that can slow down parker's solos so you can learn them that way. i don't know of any comprehensive midi transcription source--but even if i did, wouldn't it be better to hear bird at half speed than midi!!?? ;)
     
  8. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Yes, ari. I have that one. It's pretty cool, except no backing track/cd. So you'll have to figure out how to make what's written sound like what Charlie Parker really played, if you care about that. If you're just analyzing his solos for theory purposes, this book is probably worth getting. It's not really better than the Omnibook, though, so whichever's cheaper is what I'd go for if I had to choose.
     
  9. neve1073

    neve1073 Member

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  10. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

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    Yeah, Les is a great inspirer, for sure. He always maintained that any new concept required 21 straight days of reiteration in order to be assimilated. Not sure how he arrived at the math, but I bought it. I've relied on his teaching concepts for a couple of decades now.
     
  11. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

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    Could be that you and I have a mutual friend. If your last record was co-produced, and contained drum/percussion tracks, by a fellow named Jim E., be sure to give a yell for me. If I'm on track here, nice record.
     
  12. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Ahhh...so that's where I got that idea! LOL! That makes sense. I learned so much while I was there. When did you go?

    I love how Les's Bebop class had bebop completely analyzed down the most minute detail. The guy had really studied that genre. I still have the curriculum from his classes and it's some of the sickest stuff to look at --- all so concentrated! I tried to take notes in those classes but failed miserably. He spoke too quick and my note taking skills have never been very efficient.

    Cheers,

    Dave
     
  13. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    Is it a matter of reading music? Because the omnibook is a good place to start (get the concert version). There are many wrong notes but you can get the general drift. You might try just transcribing the stuff yourself. Figuring out the fingerings is part and parcel to developing your own approach IMO.
     
  14. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    A big +1...figuring out a way (or, ways) to finger those lines is the key to getting your phrasing together, in terms of both the right and left hands.
     
  15. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

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    Hi Dave,

    I attended in '84-'85. One of the best years of my life, other than being totally broke the entire time! Les has an astonishingly quick mind, and his classes were among my very faves. I struggled with note taking as well. A bud is currently borrowng my copy of Bebop Bible, but I'm starting to miss it, so I'll be needing to snatch it back shortly...
     
  16. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Hi Tim,

    I see ...you went in the golden days of the old building. I was in the first f/t classes in the new building ('87-'88).

    I have a buddy Daniel Messerli (from Switzerland originally) who used to go by the name Micky Mess that went around the same time you did. It must have been good in those smaller quarters. I get the feeling it was a lot more personal than it has since become.

    Anyway, didn't want to hijack the thread. Sorry for posting o/t.

    Cheers,

    Dave
     
  17. jackaroo

    jackaroo Member

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    Thanks for the replies everyone. I guess I'll go and buy some Parker recordings and do the whole slowdowner thing...I've used the midi program Scortch many times with great results while learning bluegrass stuff, very helpfull to slow it down and have the tab right there in front of you, plus the line is isolated as opposed to hearing slowed down cymbals, piano, bass etc...I've done it both ways and the midi way is easier for me. Granted the transcription is usually dumbed down a bit and obviously pretty stiff, so for feel stuff you have to listen to the recordings, but for getting up and going quickly I've had good results with midi based transcriptions in tandem with tab.

    Now the ?...what recordings?
    peace,

    J
     
  18. neve1073

    neve1073 Member

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    jackaroo, i agree that slowing down the recording is the best way (and also that midi transcriptions are useful too). like you said, the subtleties of phrasing can't usually be captured in notation. i once spent like a week trying to play 1/16th notes like lee morgan, the trumpet player. if midi notation software had existed at the time i could have gotten a transcription, entered it in and played to that, but....well, it's best to play along with the recordings!

    The Complete Studio Recordings on Savoy has some amazing stuff on it.
     
  19. maracox

    maracox Member

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    Thomas Owens has written his dissertation about Charlie Parker's improvisational style. You can get it probably via a university's library.

    It's an in-depth analysis of Parker's trademark licks by extracting them out of 400 transcribed solos. There's a list of the 40 or so most used licks. Owens proved that Parker used them all the time and chained them together in his solos.

    This book opened the door for me and made me understand and apply the language and sound of jazz / bebop! And that after 10 Years of trying hard. forget all those scale theory and stuff. That's the wrong key to it.

    There is also a book by Sid Jacobs (Mel Bay), I think the name was "complete book of jazz lines" or something, which includes a list that contains a lot of those parker licks.
     
    kirk95 likes this.

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