Chase Bliss -Are they getting stale.

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by Uncle Mike, Jan 12, 2019.

  1. Uncle Mike

    Uncle Mike Supporting Member

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    So I see a large number of CB Pefals always going up for sale.

    Is the CB design too out there or too complex? Are they just getting stale with new offerings by other companies, or are they not giving people the sounds they seek?

    Seems the perfect form factor and I have always enjoyed their concept but never bonded with their crazier modulation schemes.

    Love the owners passion and he seems like a seriously engaged guy.

    Your thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019
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  2. wajobu

    wajobu Supporting Member

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    No, but I have one comment on how to improve their products: Stereo
     
  3. FokenBusker

    FokenBusker Member

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    The economy is in the pits so pedal manufacturers aren't turning out their units as quickly. Their main market is musicians, who historically speaking aren't wealthy people for the most part. The fact that so many musicians WILL save up to get a CBA pedal really should speak for itself on how good they are.

    Chase Bliss pedals are incredible and you can dial in eons worth of different tones with each one.

    Also, if there are more CB pedals going up on the used market, good. That will make them more accessible to others who will be able to rock their boards harder.

    BOSS pedals have been on the used market since the 70's. But they're the #1 guitar pedal manufacturer on earth. It's not a bad thing that their units are good enough to resell.
     
  4. MoarGear

    MoarGear Member

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    I think the complex nature of them (and the very small company size) equates to a rate of innovation and new pedal releases that's on the slower end of the spectrum, without inherently meaning anything negative.

    He's hit most of the big categories now. Not as much room left without repeating oneself and cannibalizing ones own product line. It's somewhat like the last 10% of summiting Everest, or of writing a sophomore album that's as great as a much loved debut.

    I think they're brilliant pedals, that fit the needs of many, and I'm an enormous fan of the Condor and the Gravitas in particular.

    And I agree with the comment above.. offer Stereo versions in the same form factor.
     
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  5. wajobu

    wajobu Supporting Member

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    Oh, one other comment...

    The next step in innovating isn't necessarily developing a pedal that is reminiscent of another (like a reverb that has the usual: hall, plate, spring, etc.), but making what I call a "tool box" effect that can actually be used as a creative device. I think these can be developed in both the digital and analog realms. There are a few companies out there doing this, but having R&D funds to develop these kinds of effects are likely scarce for most smaller effects companies.
     
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  6. FokenBusker

    FokenBusker Member

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    I've had great luck using my Warped Vinyl Mk II as a mfx unit. I can literally build a mini board around that pedal and get everything I want. Volume, modulation, even some really nice dirt. That, a wah pedal, an octaver and a delay unit and I'm in hog heaven.
     
  7. TKIV

    TKIV Member

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    I will say this, Jason Isbell just posted some pics of his new rig and its loaded with CB pedals that were not there before.
     
  8. MoarGear

    MoarGear Member

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    I'm also an unapologetic analog audio snob and semi-pro cork sniffer, so any new offerings that are digital audio will be less and less interesting to me.

    I know it isn't entirely rational and I don't care. One likes what they like...
     
  9. DewieCox

    DewieCox Supporting Member

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    All I’ve had have been awesome.

    I think price and lack of classic sounds keeps most people from buying them.
     
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  10. FokenBusker

    FokenBusker Member

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    Analog just tastes better. It's like real sugar versus aspartame.
     
  11. oansun

    oansun Member

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    The Dark World sold out, man. And was their highest production run to date

    I think it’s about their brand becoming bigger than they were, you get more people willing to try them out. Whether it’s not for them or it’s a bit confusing idk. But i wouldn’t jump to the conclusion that they’re “stale”
     
  12. oansun

    oansun Member

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    Imagine eating margarine
     
  13. FracStrat

    FracStrat Supporting Member

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    Joel's creations are So Much More than just 'Effects Pedals' …… There is a value to them that can't be quantified by $ alone …
     
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  14. Vhailor

    Vhailor Member

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    There's always going to be a certain percentage of people who buy this or that pedal and then decide that it's not really what they are looking for.

    The more people that buy the pedal, the greater the number of people who are going to decide to move the pedal on to someone else.

    And, of course, for pricey items like Chase Bliss, you have the problem of people deciding that, although they like the pedal, they don't like it at the given, relatively high price, and that they'd be better served by a less expensive (or much less expensive) pedal along with some extra cash in their pocket. (Being on a budget is nothing of which to be ashamed.)

    So, paradoxically, more Chase Bliss pedals on the used market could be a sign of Chase Bliss's success.

    (And I'm writing this from the perspective of someone who will never buy a Chase Bliss pedal. But fair's fair.)
     
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  15. MoarGear

    MoarGear Member

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    This guy gets it.

    I drink Whole Milk, use real Butter, and drink regular Soda when I have a soda.

    Seeking virtual alternatives when the real thing still exists is crazy, to me, in almost every case.
     
  16. See3po

    See3po Member

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    By far one of the most innovative sound designers out there. Their work is brilliant. They've managed to take a traditional pedal layout and open the door to new soundscapes.

    Musically I feel like I'm still just scratching the surface of what some of their pedals can do. More than any other pedals, they bring the most out of me to innovative and push boundaries in my own music.
     
  17. Vhailor

    Vhailor Member

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    Certain effects are only available digitally.

    Certain pedals have analog processing with digital control.
     
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  18. dansworld

    dansworld Gold Supporting Member

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    In a world of ever more complex platforms to modify the sound of your instrument (hello Strymon) the CB pedals do not IMHO stand out as any more complex than any others. Of course, I'm not intimidated by DIP Switches now that I have a nice strong magnifying glass lol.

    I keep a Tonal Recall on my studio board and I use a Ground Control to call up presets on it and my Big Sky.

    It takes a little more time and effort (and manual reading) to fully encompass the capabilities of these products.

    One can always choose a Carbon Copy for their delay, which sounds warm and wonderful and does exactly as advertised 2 1/2 minutes after removing it from the box and plugging it in. These pedals have their place and are wonderful "set-and-forget" pedals for that great slapback or dubby modulated echo that you need once in a while. I have one and LOVE it on one of my small jamming pedalboards. Mission accomplished.

    When it's time to expand into more nuanced and complex aural environments pedals like the Tonal Recall and Timeline (quite different but of a similar class of complexity) to tweak and program endlessly. I can't think of too many other musical rainy day activities than that.

    There is a HUGE difference here, however. The analog heart of the TR sounds absolutely fantastic. The ability to tap (pun intended) into a vast array of configurations for that analog engine makes it a pure delight.

    Having recently become the owner of an AD4096 Mk.II, my love of murky analog bucket brigade sound degradation has been reconfirmed. This does not disqualify my El Cap, Brigadier or Replica but it certainly makes me want to use the analog pedals instead of digitally replicating analog.

    I can't speak for the rest of their line but I'd like to try their Dark World or Thermae because I am attracted to the Chase Bliss engineering style. They are costly and I have to save up for these purchases but I am usually not much of a flipper when it comes to this type of stuff; I hang onto them.

    Sorry for the long post, but in the end I do not agree that CB has become stale.
     
  19. pewing33ny

    pewing33ny Member

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    There are a lot of ding dongs who get hyped for something and then have to sell when the next thing comes along.

    I went through the cycle mentally with the volante, i was all like “ im gonna sell this pedal and upgrade it” and then realized Im a big idiot and can get there with what I have and should spend that energy practicing. And ive noticed a small uptick in cba pedals once the volante was getting hyped.

    Of course, Im on here which shows that Im a little weak to gear hoing and this forum enlightened me to chase bliss and Im eyeing a thermae as I think itd be a fun writing tool.
     
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  20. XeMeme

    XeMeme Silver Supporting Member

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    My personal opinion:

    I've been impressed with the rate of innovation and releases from CBA. I think they've also had a pretty dramatic effect on the pedal board industry (I mean... dip switches were small and hidden inside a decent amount of pedals but now it seems like everyone is using dip switch systems in every new pedal release). I think CBA's timing with a number of their pedals was either lucky or very well predicted - like the Waped Vinyl mkii, Spectre, and brothers - they came out just before waves of consumers started buzzing about those kinds of effects.

    As a former owner of 4 different CBA pedals, I thought they were very well designed and innovative; however, I parted with those pedals because I was constantly fighting inconsistent volume swings - I couldn't just dial in a setting I liked and play away. My experience with CBA pedals was that of constantly adjusting the volume/gain when experimenting with sounds which compounded over 4 pedals just made them impossible to bring to band practice. Yes, I could have sorted out settings better and saved them via midi at home (which I fully bought into and intended to do), but I just wasn't good at it - I'd find a sound I liked, think I dialed in the volume that made sense, save the patch and then go to the next patch or come back to it and it would just sound out of place. Totally due to my lack of talent and ability to make good consistent patches.

    I kept buying CBA pedals because I thought they sounded great - and they do.

    I like extreme pedals, but when they all effect either gain or volume (often in relation to modulation) it really sapped the fun factor and further contributed to my volume frustrations. In short, I found that they just didn't play well together - together they don't lack in cool sounds but they lack in audability. Of course, Brothers is an exception because while it impacted volume and gain, it wasn't a modulation pedal in the sense of CBA's other releases.

    In my opinion, if I were someone doing minimalist music recorded by myself in an intimate setting, multiple CBA pedals might make sense. In a band setting, it is hard to wrap my head around using more than one at the same time (so seeing people with 3 or more CBA pedals on their board kind of makes me snicker and suspicious of their musical prowess - hey, I know, I use to be one of those guys) with Brothers being the exception.

    I also had a personal gripe with the Gravitas. I felt it colored my sound too much and in an unpleasant way - but that may have just been me. I loved the Wombtone mkii most, but the Spaceman phaser was much more my flavor and eventually booted the Wombtone (the last pedal I kept from CBA).

    In short, CBA is an innovative and great company that has had a positive effect in the pedal industry. Definitely not for everyone and it is my personal opinion that the pedals aren't very compatible with one another. I look forward to checking out their future releases and possibly owning CBA pedals again.
     

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