Chase Bliss Tonal Recall Red Knob Mod 1100ms (Video & Updates)

Meriphew

Member
Messages
6,870
Can someone remind me what the tap division switch settings are? Pretty sure from left to right they're quarter notes/dotted eighths/eighth notes. My eyesight is so bad that I can read the small print.
 

thiscalltoarms

more gadgets than Batman.
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,920
Can someone remind me what the tap division switch settings are? Pretty sure from left to right they're quarter notes/dotted eighths/eighth notes. My eyesight is so bad that I can read the small print.
Yup, those are correct at the top level. Lower level is 8th triplets, 8th septulets, and sixteenths.
 

Jason Calieri

Supporting Member
Messages
5,788
I just noticed that with trails on, but the pedal bypassed, I can still hear a faint delay in the signal. And it's not affected by the time knob - it's a fixed delay time - but the mix and regen knobs do affect it. When I turn off trails, it goes away. I also noticed that the trails switch adds a bit of hiss/noise even when the pedal is bypassed.

Does this happen on anyone else's? It's only in the "live" pedal mode, btw, not the preset slots.
 
Messages
635
I just noticed that with trails on, but the pedal bypassed, I can still hear a faint delay in the signal. And it's not affected by the time knob - it's a fixed delay time - but the mix and regen knobs do affect it. When I turn off trails, it goes away. I also noticed that the trails switch adds a bit of hiss/noise even when the pedal is bypassed.

Does this happen on anyone else's? It's only in the "live" pedal mode, btw, not the preset slots.
This is normal, I will explain more but I'm curious, do you have a red or blue version?
 
Messages
635
Blue that was upgraded to RKM. I just emailed CB tech support, too, btw, so if you provide info here then no need to email! Thanks.
Right on. When the pedal is active (not in true bypass) there is a touch of hiss because of the attenuation in the wet / dry mix circuit and re-amping to get things back to unity. We use a clever little algorithm so that the dry signal stays mostly unity across the mix knob sweep (unless you dime the mix knob for full wet of course).

So with trails on the pedal is active and running through that mix circuitry, so that's why that is happening.

Regarding the faint bit of delay you are hearing while bypassed in live mode, is that just with your guitar in front or you running drives and stuff?

Right when you bypass the pedal in trails mode it can take a few seconds for the wet input to fade out completely, and I can see a scenario where you could still hear something but I think it'd have to be a fairly massive signal hitting the front end. I'd also still expect the time knob to change the delay time in this context so that seems weird to me that what you are hearing is a static delay. Could you CC me directly on the email (joel@chaseblissaudio.com) you sent to support and could you also send a video of the phenomenon so I know exactly what you are hearing?

Thx very much and talk soon,

Joel
 

Jason Calieri

Supporting Member
Messages
5,788
Right on. When the pedal is active (not in true bypass) there is a touch of hiss because of the attenuation in the wet / dry mix circuit and re-amping to get things back to unity. We use a clever little algorithm so that the dry signal stays mostly unity across the mix knob sweep (unless you dime the mix knob for full wet of course).

So with trails on the pedal is active and running through that mix circuitry, so that's why that is happening.

Regarding the faint bit of delay you are hearing while bypassed in live mode, is that just with your guitar in front or you running drives and stuff?

Right when you bypass the pedal in trails mode it can take a few seconds for the wet input to fade out completely, and I can see a scenario where you could still hear something but I think it'd have to be a fairly massive signal hitting the front end. I'd also still expect the time knob to change the delay time in this context so that seems weird to me that what you are hearing is a static delay. Could you CC me directly on the email (joel@chaseblissaudio.com) you sent to support and could you also send a video of the phenomenon so I know exactly what you are hearing?

Thx very much and talk soon,

Joel
Thanks, Joel! It's a static delay time, around 140 BPM. And it's definitely not just the trails fading out. I'll try to get some decent audio/video today.
 

TelePrankster

Member
Messages
989
I just wanted to share with you the way I use my Tonal Recall (blue knob version) to cover the most common delay settings we need without changing presets.
- Choose a preset slot or the middle ("knobs") position.
- Set all the dip switches to default position.
- Set the note division toggle to eighth note tap divisions (right position).
- Find a delay setting that you like but remember to not use too many repetitions. I suggest 3 to 5, I'll explain later why. Don't bother about the delay time knob, we'll use the tap tempo exclusively. Mine is always on 12 o'clock.
Now, starting from the assumption that we usually tap quarter notes:
- Tapping quarter notes (downbeats 1 and 2) will result in eighth notes because of the division toggle we changed before. Basically, the delay will "double" the repetitions depending on the tempo you tapped. This is useful for because as you know, the blue knob TR can achieve a maximum of 550ms of delay, but the tap tempo function is not limited to 550ms. If you have the pedal set for eight note tap divisions instead of quarters, you can use tap tempo even with very slow tempo songs and still get your delay in time. Repetitions would be doubled of course, but for slow songs that's the way I always did with any delay I owned.
If you are playing a fast tempo song, tapping quarter notes will result in a perfect timed slapback delay. This is VERY useful, but remember to not use too many repetitions like I said before, or the slapback would be messed up.
- Tapping half notes (downbeats 1 and 3) will result in quarter notes. That's the standard type of delay we're used to. It seems complicated to do this, but it's not. Not at all.
- Tapping downbeat 1 and the upbeat between downbeats 2 and 3 will result in dotted eight notes.
You can do all this using a single preset, I hope it's clear enough for you guys.
 

thiscalltoarms

more gadgets than Batman.
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,920
I just wanted to share with you the way I use my Tonal Recall (blue knob version) to cover the most common delay settings we need without changing presets.
- Choose a preset slot or the middle ("knobs") position.
- Set all the dip switches to default position.
- Set the note division toggle to eighth note tap divisions (right position).
- Find a delay setting that you like but remember to not use too many repetitions. I suggest 3 to 5, I'll explain later why. Don't bother about the delay time knob, we'll use the tap tempo exclusively. Mine is always on 12 o'clock.
Now, starting from the assumption that we usually tap quarter notes:
- Tapping quarter notes (downbeats 1 and 2) will result in eighth notes because of the division toggle we changed before. Basically, the delay will "double" the repetitions depending on the tempo you tapped. This is useful for because as you know, the blue knob TR can achieve a maximum of 550ms of delay, but the tap tempo function is not limited to 550ms. If you have the pedal set for eight note tap divisions instead of quarters, you can use tap tempo even with very slow tempo songs and still get your delay in time. Repetitions would be doubled of course, but for slow songs that's the way I always did with any delay I owned.
If you are playing a fast tempo song, tapping quarter notes will result in a perfect timed slapback delay. This is VERY useful, but remember to not use too many repetitions like I said before, or the slapback would be messed up.
- Tapping half notes (downbeats 1 and 3) will result in quarter notes. That's the standard type of delay we're used to. It seems complicated to do this, but it's not. Not at all.
- Tapping downbeat 1 and the upbeat between downbeats 2 and 3 will result in dotted eight notes.
You can do all this using a single preset, I hope it's clear enough for you guys.
Sure, but tapping actual dotted eighth notes while singing and leading worship is hard. At slower speeds, you'd actually tap the eighth notes and get dotted sixteenths.
 

TelePrankster

Member
Messages
989
Never had a problem tapping dotted eighth notes at any speed, but I don't sing. If you can get better results with a pedal with longer delay time, go for it. Since I like "double" repeats at any tempo, I'd probably use it with eighth notes anyway. You can't tap so fast so it would be impossible.
Anyway, I have the left preset set like shown in the post, the right preset is the exact same thing but with darker and longer repeats plus a touch of modulation. Nothing fancy, but they both work pretty much anywhere. In the middle position I experiment and create new sounds.
 

UrbanHymns

Supporting Member
Messages
2,354
Perhaps I've missed it, but has anyone done an a/b comparison between the original Tonal Recall and Tonal Recall RKM? Looking for audio or video.

I've had the original since it was released. Yes, I would like longer delay times, more repeats, and the ability for it to get brighter. I'm just wondering how much of a difference there is between the two models.
 
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tobereleased

Member
Messages
3,376
Right on. When the pedal is active (not in true bypass) there is a touch of hiss because of the attenuation in the wet / dry mix circuit and re-amping to get things back to unity. We use a clever little algorithm so that the dry signal stays mostly unity across the mix knob sweep (unless you dime the mix knob for full wet of course).

So with trails on the pedal is active and running through that mix circuitry, so that's why that is happening.

Regarding the faint bit of delay you are hearing while bypassed in live mode, is that just with your guitar in front or you running drives and stuff?

Right when you bypass the pedal in trails mode it can take a few seconds for the wet input to fade out completely, and I can see a scenario where you could still hear something but I think it'd have to be a fairly massive signal hitting the front end. I'd also still expect the time knob to change the delay time in this context so that seems weird to me that what you are hearing is a static delay. Could you CC me directly on the email (joel@chaseblissaudio.com) you sent to support and could you also send a video of the phenomenon so I know exactly what you are hearing?

Thx very much and talk soon,

Joel
This is actually something I've experienced before with a cheap belcat delay pedal. I found that the echoes could still be heard faintly when bypassed, but in particular that the level of these faint echoes increased as more different pedals were added to the same daisy chain power supply. I had suspicions that the delay chip (I assume it was a PT2399) had slight increased current demand when it was processing an echo and that the varied current draw was bleeding the echoes through the power supply into other pedals.

I wonder if the power supply Jason is using is isolated, or whether the tonal recall is sharing a daisy chain with some other pedals?

Edit: Some other thoughts. I have another delay pedal that when on, the echoes never truly drop below the noise floor. Basically, the decay is not linear, and never reaches zero amplitude. It's not particularly noticeable while playing because any new input to the delay circuitry quickly drowns out this faint decay, but if you leave the pedal and put the guitar down you can hear the faint echoes.

I'm guessing that this is based on the companding used in that particular pedal (Red Witch Violet). This particular delay doesn't have trails, but if it did, I would expect that this same faint echo would persist when bypassed, as it would not have any new input to the delay device to override the faint echoes.
 
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Messages
635
I just noticed that with trails on, but the pedal bypassed, I can still hear a faint delay in the signal. And it's not affected by the time knob - it's a fixed delay time - but the mix and regen knobs do affect it. When I turn off trails, it goes away. I also noticed that the trails switch adds a bit of hiss/noise even when the pedal is bypassed.

Does this happen on anyone else's? It's only in the "live" pedal mode, btw, not the preset slots.
Hey Jason, I just had a play with your pedal and I thought I'd respond on here rather than email. It is indeed performing consistent with our standards.

The trails bypass is admittedly a little weird. In trails, when you first go into bypass from engaged, it takes a while for the delay input path to completely fade out. For the first few seconds if you are playing hard it can bleed in pretty significantly, but over time fades out essentially completely. I was blasting signal into your pedal... I could hear the delays for the first few seconds... then they got super faint but still discernible, and after 30 seconds or a minute or so and I could not hear any new delays at all no matter how hard I played. I didn't have any boost or distortion on, just was strumming as hard as I could with a high output humbucker guitar.

This is consistent with all the RKM pedals, they perform slightly better in this regard to their blue knob counterparts.

Of course, if this is still a problem, just save a preset that has trails off, so you'll be in true bypass when you are in bypass. Then just flip to a preset that has trails when you absolutely need to have trails for a song. I *always* keep trails on in my rig, but I'm surprised as to how little I actually use it.
 

Jason Calieri

Supporting Member
Messages
5,788
Hey Jason, I just had a play with your pedal and I thought I'd respond on here rather than email. It is indeed performing consistent with our standards.

The trails bypass is admittedly a little weird. In trails, when you first go into bypass from engaged, it takes a while for the delay input path to completely fade out. For the first few seconds if you are playing hard it can bleed in pretty significantly, but over time fades out essentially completely. I was blasting signal into your pedal... I could hear the delays for the first few seconds... then they got super faint but still discernible, and after 30 seconds or a minute or so and I could not hear any new delays at all no matter how hard I played. I didn't have any boost or distortion on, just was strumming as hard as I could with a high output humbucker guitar.

This is consistent with all the RKM pedals, they perform slightly better in this regard to their blue knob counterparts.

Of course, if this is still a problem, just save a preset that has trails off, so you'll be in true bypass when you are in bypass. Then just flip to a preset that has trails when you absolutely need to have trails for a song. I *always* keep trails on in my rig, but I'm surprised as to how little I actually use it.
Cool, thanks for checking it out. I think one important thing to keep in mind is that, if you have trails on and regen cranked up high, the feedback will runaway and self-oscillate even if the pedal is OFF. I'm a big fan of trails, too, so I just need to be aware of the feedback thing.
 
Messages
635
Cool, thanks for checking it out. I think one important thing to keep in mind is that, if you have trails on and regen cranked up high, the feedback will runaway and self-oscillate even if the pedal is OFF. I'm a big fan of trails, too, so I just need to be aware of the feedback thing.
This is true - I remember there being a debate about it with my beta testing team but we decided that the pedal should still have the ability to self oscillate even in bypass if it's still chewing on some audio from when it was active.

I think what was weirding you out (appropriately so I might add) is that you would click the pedal in bypass and still be able to fill up the delay path with audio while the input of the delay path was fading out.... and then regenerating off of that and self oscillating... all while the pedal was technically in bypass.

Which I agree, that's weird. But normal. Weird and normal.
 




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