Chemotherapy... Thoughts?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by michael.e, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    Since you're in the Bay Area, I have two friends who received outstanding care for lymphoma from Stanford. Their oncology department has a great reputation (if that's an option).
     
  2. time2kill

    time2kill Member

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    I was lucky to have a strong support group. My mind was in a fog. My daughter and my ex-wife did quite a bit of research and demanded better treatment. I was included in a "Trial" that included Auto amunne drugs. It has since been approved by the FDA.

    The chemotherapy and brain radiation is over for now. I have so much radiation in my body now, they can't even scan my body for another 9 weeks.
     
  3. PaulE

    PaulE Supporting Member

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    Had 4 rounds between 2010 and 2014 prior to my stem cell transplant.
    No fun but you can get through it because basically you have no choice.
    Fcr,chop-r.Methotrexate -the worst)
    I was allergic to Rituxin which sucked because I had to have it.
    My only advice is to seek out the best in the field and where ever they are get there.
    If you want to PM me please feel free
     
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  4. s2y

    s2y Member

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    It really "depends" on a lot of variables. There are no real good blanket statements for cancer or treatment. Some solid tumors can be resected. Chemo may or may not work. Depends on the type of cancer, which stage, what types of chemo might work, how the body responds, etc. Healthcare is constantly improving, but there's a long way to go. The idea that chemo is worse than cancer is generally outdated. I have known a few individuals over the years that completely refused chemo, surgery, or radiation.
     
  5. Dr. Tweedbucket

    Dr. Tweedbucket Deluxe model available !!!11

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    I wouldn't do it. I'd starve the cancer and there are ways to do it with diet. Cancer (according to Youtube) :red thrives on sugar and carbs. I'd go on a fasting diet and live on body fat as long as I could rather then poison myself to be even sicker. .... but what do I know :dunno
     
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  6. Scuttlebutt

    Scuttlebutt Member

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    Zero experience here but I have thought about it. For me it would depend on the diagnosis and prognosis. If it was pretty grim I would most likely decline the chemo. The thought of suffering through chemo doesn't bother me too much - I just wouldn't want to waste my time if I didn't think it would be effective. I agree that grass-fed Keto type of diet could offer some benefits.
     
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  7. amstrtatnut

    amstrtatnut Member

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    Hitting like on this post doesnt really do it. Im sorry for what youre going through.
     
  8. RunninWDevil

    RunninWDevil Member

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    Not much, that’s for sure
     
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  9. RhytmEarl

    RhytmEarl Member

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    My ex wife was given 3 months. The new chemo drugs that you mentioned lengthened that to 2 'good' years and another 6 months on top of that that weren't so good. Her side effects were minimal compared to what I have seen years ago with other friends and family.

    F*** cancer.
     
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  10. Jay Will

    Jay Will Member

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    I’m on oral chemotherapeutic drugs and I’m all for trying to keep the cancer from spreading. Last October I was diagnosed with a intestinal cancer that was caught early and was removed prior to metastasizing but there is still a good chance of it returning within 5 years.
     
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  11. pickdropper

    pickdropper Supporting Member

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    A buddy of mine is going through colon cancer right now and he went in with the attitude that he was going to win. So far, he is. He actually owns a guitar shop and works most days, despite the treatment. He’s lost a lot of weight, but he’s still determined.

    Whatever you are going through, I wish you the best of luck.
     
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  12. Boston617

    Boston617 Member

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    My mother went through a form of chemo earlier this year called Erbitux.
    Same cancer fighting properties as chemo, without the hair loss.
    One of the big side effects, especially combined with radiation, is a very painful rash in the neck/chest area.
    But overall, the treatment has killed everything cancer wise in my mother, so until I get any inkling that it's back, I will call it effective.
     
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  13. Peteyvee

    Peteyvee Premium Platinum Member

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    I have the same attitude and that's what kept me going through 37 sessions of radiation. I didn't have to do chemo because they got the entire tumor with surgery and it hadn't metastasized. But I had enough radiation that if it was given to me all at once, it would have killed me 7 times over. As it was, I had radiation burns on my throat and that hurts.

    I also lost 40 pounds because I had very little appetite after radiation treatment even when eating pot edibles (with the doctors knowledge, but not necessarily his endorsement). I've since gained 20 pounds back and I'm thin and feel pretty good. The cancer is still gone or at least I hope so. I'll find out for sure next week when I get yet another PET scan.

    In any case, a positive attitude is very helpful not only for your friends and loved ones but for yourself. Good luck.
     
  14. pickdropper

    pickdropper Supporting Member

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    Glad you’re still with us, Pete.
     
  15. Peteyvee

    Peteyvee Premium Platinum Member

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    As I've been known to say lately, "it beats the hell out of being dead."
     
  16. DustyRhodesJr

    DustyRhodesJr Supporting Member

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    I have no experience with chemo, but I want to wish you prayers and all the best.

    And prayers for others such as time2kill who are also going thru this.
     
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  17. michael.e

    michael.e Supporting Member

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    Thank you all. I appreciate the kind thoughts and information. Much to digest. I was diagnosed with colon cancer. I did my CT scan this morning and my doctor will be calling me with the results within a couple hours. Time for a glass of wine and a snuggle with my son. Thanks to those of you who opened up about your personal journey. Much respect.
     
  18. Hefalump

    Hefalump Member

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    Well, it saves one heck of a lot of lives every single day.

    For those whom it cannot save, it is a necessary evil to slow the ravages of aggressive incurable diseases....but the side effects can be such, that some simply stop and welcome the end.
     
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  19. Figaro

    Figaro Supporting Member

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    My cancer story...

    I was diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2004. I discovered a lump on one of my testicles so I went to my family doctor and he sent me to a urologist who diagnosed testicular cancer and removed one of my testicles. After that a CT scan showed that cancer had spread to some lymph nodes located in my abdomen near my spine. The doctors gave me the choice of surgery to remove the lymph nodes or to go through chemotherapy. I chose surgery mainly because from what I had seen and heard about chemo, I didn’t want to go through it. The doctors told me I had a 95% chance of survival so I felt good about my chances.

    After my major surgery (that’s a story all it’s own) a biopsy of the lymph nodes gave bad news, a different type of cancer. A very aggressive type that the doctors said no one had yet survived because it’s one that was not detected by blood tests so the only way it was discovered is when a tumor is found, and by that time it’s too late.

    But... because I chose to have the surgery to remove the lymph nodes the doctors said the cancer was found the earliest they had ever found it (in microscopic form) so there was hope! And... they also said if I had chosen to have chemo instead of the surgery, the type of chemo they would have given me (there are many different kinds of chemo drugs) for the cancer that was in my testicle would not have touched this type of cancer and it surely would have eventually killed me. It was at that moment that I knew that God had helped me to make that decision and he needed me to stick around a little longer!

    But the doctors also told me that because of this type of cancer, my chance of survival had gone from 95% to 50%. So I prepared myself for death.

    So then I had to go through chemo anyway to try to stop this cancer. I got a port installed in my chest and went for chemo treatments for three months. My schedule was every day, all day for a week, then two weeks off and then do it all over again. The week after chemo was the sickest time I’ve ever been in my life. I lost about 40 pounds during my chemo treatments. Just when I would start to feel better during the third week, it was time to go back and get pumped full of my “cocktail” again.

    After I completed my chemo treatments I went for CT scans every 3 months for the first year. Then every 6 months for 4 more years. I actually got used to the taste of that Barium. Every time you go for the CT scans you’re always very nervous and scared that something’s going to show up. I really thought the cancer would come back but thank God it didn’t and I was released after 5 years. As you can imagine, I consider my team of doctors and oncologists the greatest on the planet. My body recovered but it will never be the same as it was, but that’s ok with me!

    The experience forever changed the way I live my life and I thank God for each day, every day!

    I KICKED CANCER’S ASS!

    The #1 advice I give to people battling cancer is to fight the good fight and STAY POSITIVE!
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
  20. soundchaser59

    soundchaser59 Silver Supporting Member

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    I was gonna crack some dry joke about how I spent 25 years doing chemo on myself, but then I realized this is a serious question and topic for you.

    My mother had colon cancer and refused treatment and never told anyone she had it. She hid it for maybe 20 years, then passed away at the age of 83. Makes me wonder sometimes if the side effects of the chemo actually help reduce life expectancy.
     
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