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Chicago Blues Fans - Guitarist Trivia

MVrider

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2,463
Just for fun, here's some Chicago Blues Guitar trivia. Below I ask you to guess the identities of five guitarists. Same question I asked within another thread but to eliminate confusion and to keep the threads somewhat "streamlined," this topic has been lifted from that thread and put here.

Below are clues to the identities of five different Chicago blues guitarists. By that I mean Chicago-based guitar players, not guys who visited, cut a session there or made their names elsewhere. All lived, played and recorded in Chicago during the 60's. These may not be the best well-known of the "Chicago guys" but none are not obscure characters. They all recorded on familiar labels like Chess, Delmark and Alligator.

Let's see who can figure out who they are. With one exception, all of these guys were known as electric players; one was known for acoustic prowess as well. Now for the clues...

1) The guy with "all the turnarounds." Hugely influential on the playing of many, including one very famous English "blues" guitar player, but almost no one mentions him as an influence.

2) It is almost obligatory to cite this guitar player as an "influence" but I just don't hear his smooth but distinctive style in the playing of others.

3) This guy "jazzed up" the session work behind more than one noted harp player, but his name isn't mentioned much these days.

4) This guy is musically limited, even for a blues guitarist, but wrote a famous instrumental that another guitar player gets the credit for.

5) Outspoken and opinionated, this guitarist comes from a noted musical family. If you had met him and you clicked, he would likely have given you an earful about what he calls "copy blues" or "practice blues." If not you probably wouldn't have gotten the time of day.

Take your guesses and I'll give the answers after all have had a chance to take a whack at it.
 

SUPROficial

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422
I just deleted my post because the OP specified "Chicago-based guitar players" - so Gatemouth is out.

Freddy was based out of Chicago for a while, so I suppose he can stay.
BB spent plenty of time there but wasn't based in Chicago.

Hmmm...
I change #5 back to Luther Tucker or maybe Jimmie Lee Robinson?

Lockwood...didn't he relocate to Cleveland in 1960?

Oh well...
 

MVrider

Member
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2,463
I just deleted my post because the OP specified "Chicago-based guitar players" - so Gatemouth is out.

Freddy was based out of Chicago for a while, so I suppose he can stay.
BB spent plenty of time there but wasn't based in Chicago.

Hmmm...
I change #5 back to Luther Tucker or maybe Jimmie Lee Robinson?

Lockwood...didn't he relocate to Cleveland in 1960?

Oh well...
I don't want to give away too many hints, at least not before others get a chance.

As to #5 yes, you can.

As far as Lockwood, I wouldn't consider him ineligible for consideration. ;)
 

SUPROficial

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422
Fair enough regarding Lockwood, but BB doesn't belong on the list, he was based out of Memphis. Freddy was based out of Chicago for a brief period in the 60s (I guess around the time he collaborated with Jimmy Rogers on the "Gold Tailed Bird" LP), but I don't know if he really belongs on the list.
I am pretty certain about #3 and #4 being Lockwood and Taylor.
#5 has me uncertain, on account of the "noted musical family" part.
 

MVrider

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2,463
#5 is the truly tough one. Those who know the guy would have a much easier time of it and I probably overstated it with the "noted" part. At least one other in his family is known, perhaps only to R&B fans of that era. The Jacksons, they are not.

#1 would be easy if only guys got credit where credit is due; I wouldn't be surprised if that one doesn't get clicked off.

Some are a bit ambiguous and that's intentional. Didn't want to make it the blues version of "Who's buried in Grant's Tomb?"

Enjoying your answers and thought process. ;)
 

ReidS

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695
Jimmy Johnson for the last one..brother Syl was much better known in soul music for his recordings on Hi Records,even though he played blues in Chicago to.
 
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SUPROficial

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422
#5 is the truly tough one. Those who know the guy would have a much easier time of it and I probably overstated it with the "noted" part. At least one other in his family is known, perhaps only to R&B fans of that era. The Jacksons, they are not.
Ok, I'll go with Jimmy Johnson for #5! He WAS a surly guy!

edit: I see ReidS beat me to it.
 

SUPROficial

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422
#1 would be easy if only guys got credit where credit is due; I wouldn't be surprised if that one doesn't get clicked off.
The guy who really needs more credit than he ever got, in my personal opinion, would be Eddie Taylor. My favorite, along with Lockwood and Louis Myers.

Going to amend my list once again:
1 Eddie Taylor
2 Hubert Sumlin or Otis Rush?
3 Robert Lockwood Jr
4 Hound Dog Taylor
5 Jimmy Johnson
 

ReidS

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695
The guy who really needs more credit than he ever got, in my personal opinion, would be Eddie Taylor. My favorite, along with Lockwood and Louis Myers.
I would add Luther Tucker to that list.he was great with Lockwood on so many Sonny Boy Williamson records and also his time with James Cotton.
 

ReddRanger

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3,085
The guy who really needs more credit than he ever got, in my personal opinion, would be Eddie Taylor. My favorite, along with Lockwood and Louis Myers.

Going to amend my list once again:
1 Eddie Taylor
2 Hubert Sumlin or Otis Rush?
3 Robert Lockwood Jr
4 Hound Dog Taylor
5 Jimmy Johnson
I like this list, but I'd stick with Freddy in #1 because of the British influence on Clapton. Green was influnced by Muddy, but I haer more BB in his playing. I don't really hear Eddie's influence in British blues.

I'd stick with Hubert in #2. I can hear Otis in some players but I don't hear Hubert in anyone.

4 has to be Hound Dog with Hide Away.

I have no idea on 5.
 

GulfportBound

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8,927
It's "almost obligatory" to cite Fenton as an influence?
It is for me. I'd have listed him in the '60s blues guitarists thread if he hadn't started his recording career in the '50s.

And I still haven't forgiven Boz Scaggs for trying to ace him out of the writing credit for "Somebody Loan Me a Dime," either.
 

SUPROficial

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422
It is for me.
Hey, don't get me wrong - I dig his playing and I am glad I got to see him live before he passed...but it's a name I really don't hear mentioned very often, let alone named as an influence. I don't think he gets nearly the credit he deserves.

Then again, neither does Little Milton, or Lowell Fulson, or any of the more soul-inflected guys.
 

Uncle_Salty

Member
Messages
497
Originally Posted by SUPROfficial
2. Fenton Robinson
It's "almost obligatory" to cite Fenton as an influence?
Great player, but I hear him name-dropped even less than Sammy Lawhorn!

Yeah, you're right. I just don't think of Hubert Sumlin or Otis Rush as "smooth".
 




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