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Chicago Blues Fans - Guitarist Trivia

SUPROficial

Member
Messages
422
so maybe Fenton was influential after all.
He was an influence to some players...but I was going by the OP's description: It is almost obligatory to cite this guitar player as an "influence" - I just don't hear him mentioned as an influence that often.
No denying he was a great player, I would put him in the "underrated" category nonetheless.
 

Uncle_Salty

Member
Messages
497
Originally Posted by SUPROfficial
Yeah, you're right. I just don't think of Hubert Sumlin or Otis Rush as "smooth".
Hahaha good point...although I think Otis could be REALLY smooth sometimes...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_ecjwJpcRk

...same goes for Hubert...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0MIQHymToA

...but I guess "smooth" is a pretty subjective term.

EVERYONE sounds "smooth" to me compared to Brewer Phillips.

I love Brewer & Hound Dog! House rocking music indeed.
When I think of "smooth" in blues, even more than BB, I think of Fenton Robinson and Wayne Bennett. They're both wonderful players but I rarely see them name checked.
 

SUPROficial

Member
Messages
422
Wayne Bennett was a monster player...too bad he recorded very little under his own name, which is probably why he doesn't get the recognition he deserves.
That's one guy I wish I could have seen on stage.
 

Uncle_Salty

Member
Messages
497
He was the perfect foil for Bobby Bland, wasn't he? Those jazz-inflected chords and phrases with that smooth, soulful voice? I'm off to listen to "Two Steps From The Blues"...
 

ReddRanger

Member
Messages
3,085
Hmmm....I am no expert on British stuff, but Eddie Taylor was "The Jimmy Reed Sound" and quite a few 60s British bands covered Jimmy Reed's tunes.
That's true, I guess I was focused more on an individual British guitarist that would have been influenced by a Chicago player.
 

SUPROficial

Member
Messages
422
That's true, I guess I was focused more on an individual British guitarist that would have been influenced by a Chicago player.
Brian Jones?


Not that Wikipedia is a very reliable source of info on blues but...


The Rolling Stones have cited Reed as a major influence on their sound, and their early set lists included many of Reed's songs, including tracks like "Ain't That Lovin' You Baby", "The Sun is Shining" (also played at the Stones' 1969 Altamont concert), "Bright Lights, Big City" and "Shame, Shame, Shame" ; the B-side of their February 1964 hit single "Not Fade Away" was a pastiche of "Shame, Shame, Shame" entitled "Little by Little". Their first album, The Rolling Stones, (subtitled England's Newest Hit Makers in America), released in April 1964, featured both "Little by Little" and their cover of Reed's "Honest I Do".
 

MVrider

Member
Messages
2,463
The guy who really needs more credit than he ever got, in my personal opinion, would be Eddie Taylor. My favorite, along with Lockwood and Louis Myers.

Going to amend my list once again:
1 Eddie Taylor
2 Hubert Sumlin or Otis Rush?
3 Robert Lockwood Jr
4 Hound Dog Taylor
5 Jimmy Johnson

OK. You're so close I'm closing it out a lot sooner than I thought. GREAT job.

#1 Eddie Taylor. With you all the way and then some. Yeah, this guy DOES deserve more credit. He is THE route to getting away from turnaround cliches. Lots of guys took that route but sadly Eddie never got recognition for showing the way.

#2 Otis Rush. Lots of guys pay lip service, but NOBODY nails the sound that I can only describe as "lyrical." For you guys who don't regard Otis as smooth, I'll bet you never heard him on a good night in the late 60's or early 70's. Smooth, edgy, burning. He had it all. On a good night... with a good crowd... and when the wind was blowing in from Lake Michigan...

I've heard a bunch of the legends lots of times, but if I had to pick one guy on one night...

Sidebar: Some say Otis never got over being "screwed" on his early recordings so he never again gave his all when the machines were rolling. Other have said he just couldn't get comfortable in the studio environment. Who knows for sure but his recordings never matched up to the live stuff.

Tip: If you can ever find a copy of Otis backed up by the Ike Turner Band (the live stuff not the studio stuff that's out on CD)....

#3 Luther Tucker. While Robt. Jr. could easily fit the bill, Luther is the one who takes it on the basis of "less mention these days."

#4 Theodore Roosevelt Taylor. The Dog, y'all. I'll have to confess that I didn't believe him when he told me he was the one who wrote "that 'Hideaway' song." Everybody, of course, "knew" it was Freddie. Years after that I read an interview where Freddie spilled the beans. And down the road, Robt. Jr. told me more about how the song was shaped with the Dog's basic hook being augmented by many players over time. It certainly wasn't the Dog who came up with touches like that distinctively voiced "Hideaway" chord on the break but the basic hook was his. I miss you, Dog.

#5 Jimmie Johnson. You guys even got the "tough one." Did my "Take a whack at it" help on that one? ;)

Didn't think I'd be closing this out so fast. So congrats to all of you, especially SUPROfficial and also ReidS for the mention of Luther T.
 

SUPROficial

Member
Messages
422
#2 Otis Rush. Lots of guys pay lip service, but NOBODY nails the sound that I can only describe as "lyrical." For you guys who don't regard Otis as smooth, I'll bet you never heard him on a good night in the late 60's or early 70's. Smooth, edgy, burning. He had it all. On a good night... with a good crowd... and when the wind was blowing in from Lake Michigan...
I remember seeing Otis on two consecutive nights in the early 90s and it was unbelievable how different the two shows were. He seemed pretty indifferent the first night, but the second night he just looked miserable and depressed. Played like his pants were on fire both nights, but it almost sounded like a different player each time. One night he was smooth and jazzy, picking mostly with his fingers, the next night he was stinging like Albert King. It was really strange. He struck me as a very unhappy guy.

Tip: If you can ever find a copy of Otis backed up by the Ike Turner Band (the live stuff not the studio stuff that's out on CD)....
Oooooh where do I find THAT?


It certainly wasn't the Dog who came up with touches like that distinctively voiced "Hideaway" chord on the break but the basic hook was his.

I always thought that stop-time chord came from JB Hutto, it sounded like one of his licks to me.

Thanks for this thread, probably the most fun I've had on TGP!
 

MVrider

Member
Messages
2,463
I remember seeing Otis on two consecutive nights in the early 90s and it was unbelievable how different the two shows were. He seemed pretty indifferent the first night, but the second night he just looked miserable and depressed. Played like his pants were on fire both nights, but it almost sounded like a different player each time. One night he was smooth and jazzy, picking mostly with his fingers, the next night he was stinging like Albert King. It was really strange. He struck me as a very unhappy guy.


Oooooh where do I find THAT?






I always thought that stop-time chord came from JB Hutto, it sounded like one of his licks to me.

Thanks for this thread, probably the most fun I've had on TGP!

Otis has his "ups and downs." As to performances, one night it couldn't be better and the next night the show might be so bad I'd want three bucks back for the two dollar admission.

I don't think the Otis/Ike Turner live stuff has ever been released...

Robt Jr. put in that 6add9. He arranged the jazzy stuff on the Little Walter records and taught (the much younger) Tucker his parts.

J Geils studied all that and put a lot of it behind Magic Dick to good effect in the 70's. BTW, if you haven't heard it, Geils also did a very tasteful job of stringing a bunch of Charlie Christian solos together on the stuff he did with Dick more recently. Good job on the old-school stuff, not only the CC stuff. Freshens it up without losing the groove or the period sound.
 

jpastras

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,064
Sean Costello had audible Otis influence.

Eddie Taylor had tremendous song sense. Even when he played the absolute simplest blues, he played it like a song. He's so great, it's ridiculous. The record with pic on the back where he's got the 345 strapped on and is drinking out of a coffee cup is a deadly killer. Essential.

I wish I sucked at guitar as bad as Hound Dog. That's like saying Neil Young sucks at guitar. To me, "Is it good music?" is a much more important question than "Is it simple?" or "Is it complex?". Hound Dog plays like he can't help but kick ass.

Good quiz questions!
 

Uncle_Salty

Member
Messages
497
Thanks for that, MV Rider! That was a lot of fun!

You're definitely right about Luther Tucker. Definitely, underrated/forgotten.

As for Otis Rush, I was just overthinking the word 'smooth'. Sorry for the derail.
Otis is my all time favourite bluesman and I have been lucky enough to see him twice at Blues Festivals in Japan (I don't count the third time just after his stroke.) I think he really enjoyed playing here - his missus is Japanese - and was on fire both times, both on the fretboard and with that magnificent voice. Seeing him live was definitely different from his recordings but I also love some of his albums, too. His Cobra singles are great - although a lot of the fretwork is Ike Turner - and the sadly apt 'Right Place, Wrong Time' is a much underrated masterpiece.

Once again, thanks for that!
 

teleman55

Member
Messages
3,587
Ok, I'll go with Jimmy Johnson for #5! He WAS a surly guy!

edit: I see ReidS beat me to it.

Jimmy Johnson wasn't a surly guy. I used to play with him when I was a kid. Well not a kid kid, but like early 20's. He was a nice guy. Learned a lot from him. Or maybe that means I'm surly too an just don't know it, lol.
I'm thinking Jimmy Rogers at #3. And Hubert Sumlin, Otis Rush in there somewhere. And maybe Magic Sam?? And how about Muddy?? I mean as a guitar player? Every blues guy cites him but you never hear them playin that sound. Closest I hear that is probably when the Rolling Stones play blues. And what about Mike Bloomfield or Buddy Guy???


Ooops, saw it's all done on page 2. Silly me. Still fun though. Long live the blues!
 

MR.K

Member
Messages
1,857
Jimmy Johnson for the last one..brother Syl was much better known in soul music for his recordings on Hi Records,even though he played blues in Chicago to.

The "Two Johnsons Are Better Than One" CD is way up on my listening list.
 




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