Chord Reference Material? Added Question

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by vashondan, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. vashondan

    vashondan Supporting Member

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    Let's see if I can be clear about what I'm asking! I want to focus on learning triads across the neck from this perspective. Using the key of C as an example I want to be able to on, all string sets, play the following triads; Cmajor, Dm, Em, Fmajor, GMajor, Am, B dim. Oh, and in root, 1st and 2nd inversions.

    Is there a good book or?

    Does this make sense?

    I know how to build the triads I just need something to help me practice.

    Thanks
     
  2. FwLineberry

    FwLineberry Member

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    It makes perfect sense, but you should work this stuff out for yourself. You will learn so much if you do.

    Start with Major triads on every set of three adjacent strings and work out the inversions up and down the fingerboard. If you're familiar at all with various major chord shapes, You'll start seeing the basis for those shapes right away. As you work up and down the string sets, you'll start seeing the relationships across the stings as well.

    Once you've got major happening, all you have to do is alter the appropriate intervals to get the others.

    With a little work, you'll be moving up and down the scales harmony like nothing.

    .
     
  3. vashondan

    vashondan Supporting Member

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    You’re right, thanks. I got tired of looking for charts and started working it out. I’ve got the major, minor and diminished shapes done for the top 3 strings done.
     
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  4. Bluesful

    Bluesful Supporting Member

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    Dude - Chord Chemistry!!!
     
  5. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Yes and also Ted's hero, George Van Eps' Guitar Method.
     
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  6. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Vic Juris's Modern Chords book covers this in the first few pages.
     
  7. Neer

    Neer Supporting Member

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    Definitely George Van Eps Guitar Method, long out of print but available as a digital download for $10 here: http://www.djangobooks.com/Item/vaneps_method

    This book was recommended to me in the '80s by Mike Stern, who worked through it and it is evident in his playing at times. I still have my original copy from back then. No tab, though, you need to be able to read notation a little.
     
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  8. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    I bought my copy at appliance store in Tucson AZ in 1977. They sold dishwashers, vinyl, and sheet music.
     
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  9. Banditt

    Banditt Supporting Member

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    The way Ted organizes chord inversions by up the neck by chord tone is the absolute thing that made my playing take off, and I use it EVERY time I play. Couple that with his section on Blues chord Progressions and you will be a Monster.....
     
  10. mastercaster

    mastercaster Member

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    Last edited: Mar 24, 2019
  11. abracadabra

    abracadabra Member

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    I've gotten a lot out of the Guitar Grimoire one (regarding chords). I've found the later sections on how extended chords can be played using simpler chords built off their thirds or fifths, for example, very useful. not what you're looking for now, but it has all the core information as well and might be useful for more complicated stuff in the future.
     
  12. vashondan

    vashondan Supporting Member

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    Thanks guys. I've got a list and I'll check it twice. I'm going to do the work suggested early in the thread but I'd also like a reference as I'm a visual learner. A guitar teacher asked me yesterday what's the most important tool a guitarist has.
     
  13. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Oh yes, those were the days. In 1960s London UK, our local music shop sold furniture. I mean, it was a furniture shop that also sold records (in the basement) and instruments (in the back).
    You can guess the link: furniture > radiograms > record players > records > sheet music > musical instruments. "Hey," you imagine them thinking, "a guitar is made of wood, so we've come full circle there!" :)
    To be fair, the link was already there with pianos. "What else is there that's made of wood and makes noises? Guitars! Let's order some of those. You never know, they might catch on..."
     
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  14. JonR

    JonR Member

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    I fully support the idea of doing it yourself. It's not hard, just a little time-consuming, but you learn much better that way than from a book. You can print out a load of blank fretboard diagrams from online and start filling in the dots - and playing the chords too, of course, to be sure you've got them right. In fact playing them is more important than making the diagrams.
    Ask yourself what notes are in each shape, but more importantly which is root-3rd-5th (and 7th if applicable).
    What was your answer?

    1. Guitar
    2. Fingers
    3. Ears
    4. Book of techniques
    5. Book of scales and shapes
    6. Book of theory
    7. Book of songs

    There's only one right answer. I think you can guess. ;) (The other answers are all good, but I'll leave it to you to rank them.)
     
  15. vashondan

    vashondan Supporting Member

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    At the time I didn’t really understand the question. His answer and it makes sense was the ears. A lot of the exercises I’m getting from him really involve using or developing my ears.
     
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  16. Bryan T

    Bryan T guitar owner Silver Supporting Member

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    I also suggest mapping it out yourself. Understanding “drop” naming conventions might help you keep track of everything.
     
  17. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Right.
    Similar thoughts here:

    "You are the instrument."
    "If you can't hear it, you can't play it."

    Of course, this is all a different issue from just learning the fretboard, which is your current task! That is all about information. But once you've learned that stuff - mastered the fretboard - then it's all just hearing stuff in your head, and playing. I.e., the information (eventually) becomes subconscious, and that's when you can actually play - "process", not "information". It's the same as when you speak: you don't have to think about what order to put the words in, or how to shape your mouth or tongue - that's all subconscious, because it was trained long ago.
     
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  18. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    This conversation could have ended with the Ted Greene/Van Eps recommendation, but I just thought I'd add that in my many conversations with Ted Greene he made it very clear to me he felt unlocking this information was the key to understanding the instrument, harmonically. This was his starting point with any student that had even a little ability.
     
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  19. vashondan

    vashondan Supporting Member

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    You’re right. I got tired of looking for charts and started working it out. I’ve got the major, minor and diminished shapes done for the top 3 strings done.

    That was great.
     
  20. vashondan

    vashondan Supporting Member

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    I'm a bit late to the party. Ive learned bits of this material over time but never comprehensively. I've also learned chords and chord construction but never in service of learning the neck etc.
     

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